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Comet Halley 1986

astrophotography
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#1 Marty0750

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 08:48 AM

On 12 March 1986 ~4am at Mount Barker, South Australia

 

Olympus OM1, 50mm f 1.8, 4 minutes on hand-guided homemade barndoor tracker.

Ilford HP4 (400 ASA) Developed in ID-11 forced to 800 ASA.

 

View looking east at the Sagittarius/Capricornus boundary.

 

Halley-01-sh web.jpg

 

 

 


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#2 AstroDan2015

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 09:16 AM

Hi Marty,

 

Thanks for sharing with us your fine 33 year old photo of this historic comet. I did get to glimpse it through binoculars back in November of '85. I like your avatar, it reminds me of when I too built my 6" reflector from scratch back in the 1970's. Including; grinding, polishing and figuring the Pyrex mirror, what a fantastic experience. I can't wait until July 2061 when Mr. Halley's Great Comet returns, it will be closest to the earth on the exact day of my 100th birthday!

 

Cheers, Dan smile.gif


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#3 Richard O'Neill

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 09:30 AM

  Thanks for the trip down memory lane, one third of a century later. I remember the time well and have many photos taken with hypered panchromatic film using a home built 6" F/2.5 4X5 plate camera with full aperture internally switchable filters to record the comet's trailing ions and dust. The location was deep in the Florida Everglades, surround by gators, snakes and skeeters, lots and lots of blood sucking skeeters! It was a wonderful once in a lifetime experience. flowerred.gif

 

Comet Camera

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#4 Marty0750

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 09:55 PM

Hi Marty,

 

Thanks for sharing with us your fine 33 year old photo of this historic comet. I did get to glimpse it through binoculars back in November of '85. I like your avatar, it reminds me of when I too built my 6" reflector from scratch back in the 1970's. Including; grinding, polishing and figuring the Pyrex mirror, what a fantastic experience. I can't wait until July 2061 when Mr. Halley's Great Comet returns, it will be closest to the earth on the exact day of my 100th birthday!

 

Cheers, Dan smile.gif

...and I will  be 111 wink.gif

 

Marty


Edited by Marty0750, 10 September 2019 - 09:55 PM.

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#5 TxStars

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 11:01 PM

I remember viewing it in 85 and 86, Hope to see it again in 2061 at the young age of 96...


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#6 Marty0750

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Posted 11 September 2019 - 03:49 AM

This is the setup with the same OM1 that took the Halley picture 33 years ago. The barn-door tracker is a recent improvement of the old one. Yep I still use it!

 

IMGP4074-proc.jpg


Edited by Marty0750, 11 September 2019 - 05:53 AM.

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#7 Roragi

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Posted 11 September 2019 - 06:24 AM

Very nice report, I hope not to miss the next trip of the comet in 1986 I was only 3 years old.


Edited by Roragi, 11 September 2019 - 06:24 AM.


#8 Marty0750

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Posted 11 September 2019 - 06:25 AM

Hi Marty,

 

Thanks for sharing with us your fine 33 year old photo of this historic comet. I did get to glimpse it through binoculars back in November of '85. I like your avatar, it reminds me of when I too built my 6" reflector from scratch back in the 1970's. Including; grinding, polishing and figuring the Pyrex mirror, what a fantastic experience. I can't wait until July 2061 when Mr. Halley's Great Comet returns, it will be closest to the earth on the exact day of my 100th birthday!

 

Cheers, Dan smile.gif

THank you Dan.

 

Yes there is nothing like having built your own scope. I still use it today..

An article about it here (you may have seen it already as I posted the link a while ago)

https://martins-arti...lescope_26.html

 

Marty


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#9 jwheel

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Posted 11 September 2019 - 09:31 AM

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#10 AstroDan2015

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Posted 12 September 2019 - 01:52 PM

Hi Marty,

 

Your 6" ATM article is excellent. I started grinding my mirror back in 1975, when finished it provided sharp images of Saturn at 275X. These days most amateur astronomers have no interest in building their own telescope, what a shame. Did you observe Halley's Comet through the 6"?

 



#11 Uwe Pilz

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Posted 13 September 2019 - 04:10 AM

Halley was the first comet I saw at all. In my memory it was  rather dim. Now I observe comets regularely, and I would count such a bright comet to be a bright one. How observation changes everything!

Thank you for sharing.



#12 SteveInNZ

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 02:45 AM

That's excellent Marty0750. I did see it when it was like that but didn't get a photo until the tail was pointing away from us. It would be graded as rubbish by anyone but me, but it's my fuzzy blob and I'm happy to have it.
 

Thanks for the trip down memory lane, one third of a century later. I remember the time well and have many photos taken with hypered panchromatic film using a home built 6" F/2.5 4X5 plate camera with full aperture internally switchable filters to record the comet's trailing ions and dust. The location was deep in the Florida Everglades, surround by gators, snakes and skeeters, lots and lots of blood sucking skeeters! It was a wonderful once in a lifetime experience. flowerred.gif

I'd love to hear more about your camera. I've recently been tempted into the LF world and am thinking about adding a field camera to the mix. I was thinking mostly of star trails but there's room on the mount so you never know. Start another thread if you think it's appropriate.

 

Steve.



#13 Richard O'Neill

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 07:00 PM

Hello Steve,

 

 There's really not much to tell beyond what you see. The camera is built around a WWII wide angle aerial recon lens and a 4X5 plate camera back. The field coverage is approx. 36x45 degrees. Internally there are two large Kodak Wratten gelatin filters on swinging arms, one to record the blue ion tail and another to record the dust trail. Either can be swung into place behind the lens. A resistive heater wrapped around the lens prevents dew.

 

 In addition to Halley, this wide field camera has been used to record other long tailed Comets like West '70, Bennett '76, Hale-Bopp '97 and Bradfield '04. The filters were added specifically for Comet Halley but have proved useful for the last two really interesting comets. It's now in storage, awaiting its next assignment. I still have 4x5 sheet and 35mm 2415 film in the freezer, just in case another comet passes by.

 

Richard


Edited by Richard O'Neill, 14 September 2019 - 07:03 PM.

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#14 SteveInNZ

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 05:04 PM

Thanks Richard,

 

Should I try hunt out recon lenses or is that something that you just happened to have ?

Are there particular aspects/types of LF lenses that I should avoid ? This is really like being back at square one for me. That's a good thing. So much to learn.

 

Steve.



#15 Giorgos

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 01:07 AM

Excellent photo and excellent homemade telescope in the true spirit of ATMing! Congrats!!!




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