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colourful DSOs, blue snowball

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#26 Dave McCrary

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 10:33 AM

That's one I haven't found yet. Was it difficult for you? I have tried a couple of times with no luck.



#27 havasman

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 02:05 PM

That's one I haven't found yet. Was it difficult for you? I have tried a couple of times with no luck.

Dave,

 

What are you using to try and find NGC7662? If you have a decent chart like the S&T Pocket Sky Atlas there are some prominent queues nearby that should help your search. Xi, Lambda, Kappa and Iota Andromedae are bright (mV 4.95, 3.82, 4.14 & 4.29) stars that form a slightly elongated triangle with a "tail star" (Iota) just SSW of Kappa. From Iota it's a short step to bright mV 5.75 13 And. NGC7662 is within the FOV of most widefield eyepieces if 13 And is centered in the field. The PN will be the brightest object in the field that isn't 13 And and will also be non-stellar. That star pattern is key to this actually being an easier DSO to find. A Telrad should be handy in many setups since the marker stars are bright.

 

You may also be able to sketch a chart from the Wikisky.ORG view on your computer screen using the DSS2 images and come up with a good enough guide to this object.

 

It's a beauty. Good luck with your search.


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#28 Dave McCrary

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 01:34 PM

Thanks Havasman. I found NGC 7662. That's the one I discovered higher magnification works better on PN's. I meant NGC 6210 The Turtle Nebula. Is that smaller than ngc7662?



#29 judebox

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 03:04 PM

Thanks Havasman. I found NGC 7662. That's the one I discovered higher magnification works better on PN's. I meant NGC 6210 The Turtle Nebula. Is that smaller than ngc7662?

Sorry for the late reply dave, I found NGC 6210 alot easier than ngc 7662. The way i found out was going a bit above Beta herculis I think it was, and then in my 9x50 finder I could see a big group of stars at the top of the FOV and a small triangle beneath that group.(my finder scope is not corrected) I believe on of the stars in that trinagle is the turtle nebula. Its a bit smaller than ngc 7662, seems like the surface brightness is a bit dimmer though not that different, but the colour was much stronger and more green. (maybe thats why its called turtle nebula?)



#30 Inkswitch

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 10:46 AM

Conditions were very good here last night.  I spent a few hours before the moon got up.  M57 was just past culmination and I spent a good long while looking for the central star (no joy) and color.  The majority of the nebula looks "planetary green" to me.  It is not a very strong color but it is different from say a galaxy which appears white or grey.  There are sections of the ring that are far brighter than the majority and those sections appear white to me.  The ability to apply high magnification along with favorable conditions gave me one of the best views of M57 to date.  Still haven't bagged the central star.



#31 Inkswitch

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 10:53 AM

Its a bit smaller than ngc 7662, seems like the surface brightness is a bit dimmer though not that different, but the colour was much stronger and more green. (maybe thats why its called turtle nebula?)

If you apply high magnification to NGC 6210 you will see a squashed oval in the center and four-five "nubs" sticking out of the squashed oval.  It looks like a turtle seen from above with it's head and legs out of it's shell.  I recommend looking at the SDSS picture after you view it.  The origin of the "nubs" is obvious, yet the picture is so different than the telescopic view.  Here is my observation report from another thread in Deep Sky Observing:

 

Last night (08JUL19)I viewed NGC 6210 aka The Turtle Nebula, a planetary in Hercules.  I used the 12" and a range of magnifications, I felt the best view with my setup was had at 188X.  I used an OIII (Lumicon circa 2005) and a UHC (Orion Ultrablock circa 2012).  Both filters improved the view but I have to give the edge to the UHC it really made the nebula pop.  I saw the "bumps" that pop out the side and give this nebula it's name, it looks a little like a turtle seen from above.  The SDSS picture shows large lobes and streamers of gas that make these "bumps".  The nebula was evident at 63X unfiltered as an obviously non stellar spot in the field.  It was "Planetary Green" in the unfiltered view.  I rate it 3/5, worth hunting down for yourself but you probably won't wow any crowds.


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#32 havasman

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 11:51 AM

NGC6210 is one of those nebulae that presents very differently in different photos. I have never seen the outer envelopes that appear in some deep pics. However, with the 16" at ~high mags, 350 & 446x usually, the main body can show some mottling/detail and the 3 main ansae show up pretty clearly with the 4th little stub on the E side sometimes appearing mostly as a faint hint of a thing.

 

This pic is more like what I have seen of N6210 than many others - http://astrowhw.blog...erturtles.html 

 

Most of us with regular observing skills will not see much detail in these objects at low magnifications. But their very high surface brightness makes high magnification observing quite productive from a dark site in good conditions.




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