Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Water on an exo-planet

  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Edd Weninger

Edd Weninger

    Apollo

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1076
  • Joined: 16 Feb 2014

Posted 11 September 2019 - 06:35 PM

https://www.bbc.com/...onment-49648746

 

Cheers,

 

 


  • CharlesC likes this

#2 nicoledoula

nicoledoula

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 950
  • Joined: 31 Jan 2018

Posted 11 September 2019 - 08:48 PM

Will this planet be closer or farther away by the time we have the technology to get to it? 



#3 dpastern

dpastern

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1275
  • Joined: 01 Jan 2009
  • Loc: Brisbane, Australia

Posted 11 September 2019 - 10:51 PM

space.com has an article on this too, but notes some differences to the BBC article:

 

https://www.space.co...ce=notification

 

notably, said exoplanet has 8 times the mass of Earth (not 2 like the BBC article states) and orbits a Red dwarf that emits far higher levels of radiation than Sol does too.  

 

Here's One of the papers on this:

 

https://arxiv.org/pdf/1909.04642.pdf

 

note: the data hasn't been peer reviewed as of yet.  The other (main) paper is only available as an abstract, so no full article.  

 

Can't wait for James Webb telescope to launch and get to work.

 

The evidence so far bodes well though - it would suggest that the atmosphere hasn't been stripped away by the parent stars radiation field, and would suggest that it has a molten core too and rotates (both of which are required for a planet to retain its atmosphere).  Given that it's a super Earth, it could possible be a water planet, scientists theorise that larger mass super Earth planets have a good chance of being water planets given the right conditions of course.  



#4 dpastern

dpastern

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1275
  • Joined: 01 Jan 2009
  • Loc: Brisbane, Australia

Posted 11 September 2019 - 10:53 PM

Will this planet be closer or farther away by the time we have the technology to get to it? 

by the time humanity can travel those sorts of distances, it'll probably be a moot question imho.  If we can figure out how to travel at 90% of c, then it'd be like 125 years to get to the star, i.e. either an automated probe, or a multi-generational ship.  It would be far easier to do a probe of course (don't have to worry about food, water, breathable environment for passengers, etc).  



#5 vio

vio

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 129
  • Joined: 27 Apr 2011
  • Loc: Fort Lauderdale, FL

Posted 12 September 2019 - 08:15 AM

I’ve always been puzzled by how many articles mix two concepts: alien life and habitable planets (which would seem, for us and the species we know most). Not sure what scenarios these cover, us relocating (which should also consider getting there) or other life being in the universe. Alien life may not need water, or an atmosphere, unless life is what we can observe as life. If a “subject” does not show signs of life during my lifetime, is this proof of being an object vs life form? What if the timespan of a life event is too small for me to observe? I have a feeling that microorganisms may not be able to tell that we, humans, are living things, and possibly because of different scales of time. Isn’t our definition of alien life a bit “racist” in way?

This is not denying the merits of the research, just makes me wonder if those that do it have a scenario in mind.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

#6 dpastern

dpastern

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1275
  • Joined: 01 Jan 2009
  • Loc: Brisbane, Australia

Posted 12 September 2019 - 06:27 PM

I’ve always been puzzled by how many articles mix two concepts: alien life and habitable planets (which would seem, for us and the species we know most). Not sure what scenarios these cover, us relocating (which should also consider getting there) or other life being in the universe. Alien life may not need water, or an atmosphere, unless life is what we can observe as life. If a “subject” does not show signs of life during my lifetime, is this proof of being an object vs life form? What if the timespan of a life event is too small for me to observe? I have a feeling that microorganisms may not be able to tell that we, humans, are living things, and possibly because of different scales of time. Isn’t our definition of alien life a bit “racist” in way?

This is not denying the merits of the research, just makes me wonder if those that do it have a scenario in mind.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

I think many are desperate to find life outside of our own planet's ecosphere.  The big question is how do you define "life" of course.  



#7 BillP

BillP

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 18642
  • Joined: 26 Nov 2006
  • Loc: Spotsylvania, VA

Posted 13 September 2019 - 09:29 PM

I’ve always been puzzled by how many articles mix two concepts: alien life and habitable planets (which would seem, for us and the species we know most). Not sure what scenarios these cover, us relocating (which should also consider getting there) or other life being in the universe. Alien life may not need water, or an atmosphere, unless life is what we can observe as life. If a “subject” does not show signs of life during my lifetime, is this proof of being an object vs life form? What if the timespan of a life event is too small for me to observe? I have a feeling that microorganisms may not be able to tell that we, humans, are living things, and possibly because of different scales of time. Isn’t our definition of alien life a bit “racist” in way?

This is not denying the merits of the research, just makes me wonder if those that do it have a scenario in mind.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

 

Hard really to search for something when you have no clue what conditions are necessary for life to begin (abiogenesis).  We don't know that.  They only thing we do know is what conditions established life needs (i.e., present day Earth).  Basically we are really just shooting in the dark (literally) trying to find life.  And true that if all we are doing is looking for familiar Earth-like life, we very well could miss other forms that do not need or use the common elements and compounds we need.  Just a waste of time IMO.  Money is better spent towards space venturing that will have practical benefits for us now (space industry, mining, asteroid defense, off-world outposts (just to gain the capability)), and if we stumble across other life in the process, just icing on the cake.



#8 John Fitzgerald

John Fitzgerald

    In Focus

  • *****
  • Posts: 6351
  • Joined: 04 Jan 2004
  • Loc: ROR Obs. near Pettigrew, AR

Posted 13 September 2019 - 09:56 PM

The possibility exists for a dinosaur planet.



#9 bumm

bumm

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2526
  • Joined: 07 Jan 2011
  • Loc: Iowa

Posted 14 September 2019 - 05:18 PM

Vio was saying

I’ve always been puzzled by how many articles mix two concepts: alien life and habitable planets

 

What's even more frustrating to me is when any possibility of alien life is equated to UFOs coming HERE.

                                                                                                          Marty

.




CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics