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A good book on building a Dobsonian telescope

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#1 NeutronStar79

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Posted 12 September 2019 - 02:30 AM

Hello

I have been an amateur astronomer for about 3 years. Although I have no experience in constricting things myself, I would like to embark on a project to build my own Dobsonian tube and mount.

Do you have any advice on a book or guide I should start with? I don't want to make mirrors, only structures!

Thanks and clear skies to all

#2 jp071848

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Posted 12 September 2019 - 05:04 AM

I have this one, great book

 

https://www.amazon.c...s/dp/0943396557


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#3 sg6

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Posted 12 September 2019 - 07:21 AM

Not a book but has a look through the Stellafane site:

https://stellafane.org/

 

They seem to have built most versions of things that can be called a telescope, and a few that likely fail description.

 

Their Links page is where to start, but I will say that quite a few are out of date and lead nowhere;

https://stellafane.org/misc/links.html

 

I find that even if you do not find one specific all encompassing artical then you can get ideas on several individual items, ideas, part to develop yourself.

 

Well just tried it: Go google: "dobsonian telescope building pdf"

First one looks good: http://www.scopemaki...a dobsonian.pdf

 

And there are several that people have put up on the internet.

 

This appears to be a legitimate pdf ebook download site so might find one (full book) here

https://epdf.pub/the...-telescope.html


Edited by sg6, 12 September 2019 - 07:29 AM.

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#4 starcanoe

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Posted 12 September 2019 - 08:00 AM

What size are you thinking about?

 

I'll throw this out. A six inch f8 dob is IMO the cat's meow for both a first time project AND a lifetime "grab and go" telescope.



#5 gordtulloch

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Posted 12 September 2019 - 09:08 AM


This appears to be a legitimate pdf ebook download site so might find one (full book) here

https://epdf.pub/the...-telescope.html

That seems to be Kriege and Berry and is most definitely not a legal download!


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#6 gordtulloch

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Posted 12 September 2019 - 09:10 AM

This book by Albert Highe is a lot more recent than the Kriege and Berry book referenced above, I'd call both of them a definitive reference to large Dobs!

 

Engineering, Design, and Construction of Portable Newtonian Telescopes Hardcover by Albert Highe

https://www.amazon.c...s/dp/0943396956



#7 Starman1

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Posted 12 September 2019 - 11:56 AM

What Gord said.  +1.



#8 cloudmagnet

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Posted 13 September 2019 - 09:12 AM

I have this one, great book

 

https://www.amazon.c...s/dp/0943396557

Ditto: Great how-to book!



#9 corax

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Posted 13 September 2019 - 04:15 PM

Both the Kriege and Berry book and the Highe book seem to be focused on larger (14"+) Dobs. If one had more modest ambitions for ones first build (say, 6" to 10"), would these still be helpful books? Are the plans easily scaled down, or in this situation would one be better off using the Stelllafane site or another online resource?



#10 Oberon

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Posted 13 September 2019 - 04:43 PM

Probably the latter, although the books would still provide useful information conceptually. I guess it depends partly on how good you are at translating concepts into applications. Telescopes do scale up and down to some extent, but keep an eye out for weight distribution, as the focuser and eyepieces don’t change and their mass becomes much more significant on smaller telescopes. OTOH smaller telescopes are much more relaxed when it comes to eyepiece height, which in turn plays into size and location of altitude bearings. Also, material mass and dimensions (such as thickness of plywood) are much more relaxed, it is really quite easy to build a practical 6”-10” Dob, and there are many more low cost off the shelf options that can be utilised on a smaller Dob that have to be custom built on larger scopes.


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#11 Starman1

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Posted 13 September 2019 - 05:38 PM

Both the Kriege and Berry book and the Highe book seem to be focused on larger (14"+) Dobs. If one had more modest ambitions for ones first build (say, 6" to 10"), would these still be helpful books? Are the plans easily scaled down, or in this situation would one be better off using the Stelllafane site or another online resource?

This would be great for a smaller scope:

https://www.amazon.c...y/dp/0943396697


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#12 Stargazer

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Posted 13 September 2019 - 08:14 PM

you can usually find the books at the library, free to use, if they do not have them in they can usually

get them in rather quickly, what i did for my 10" project.

 

Have the Kriege and Berry book here as well, money well spent.



#13 astro744

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 12:04 AM

Have a look at https://www.willbell.com/tm/tm2.htm

 

and https://www.willbell.com/tm/dobtel.htm

 

The former has a few different designs for solid tubes and latter is for truss designs but has a simpler structure for a solid tube 10" that can be scaled.  Both books have a lot of useful info in general.

 


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#14 tommm

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 11:32 AM

I have never looked at Berry's book, but have both Kreige & Berry and Highe books. Of those two K&B is the more "nuts and bolts" oriented, going through details of all aspects of design with the why and wherefore and giving tables of dimensions,e.g., of mirror cells for different size primary mirrors, basically telling you exactly how to make it.  Highe goes into more detail on calculations and also has quite a bit of "how to", but is not the step by step "how to" that K&B is.  I would guess that Berry's book is even more "nuts & bolts" than the other two.

 

You will likely use a tube for a smaller scope so don't need the info on trusses in K&B or Highe, but the info on OTA balance still applies. My philosophy is the more you know the better, so if you can get at least a couple of them through inter-library loan it would be worth checking them all out. Also reading different perspectives or approaches many times gives you a better understanding - what one author didn't explain in a way you understand, another may.

 

Also do searches here on CN for smaller scope builds. I think this one by Dave Brock is really nice.


Edited by tommm, 14 September 2019 - 11:37 AM.

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#15 lonn

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 01:35 PM

Ok, I just made a 8" dob.I used the web site Storm Castle Telescope " How to make a 8" dob. I dont have much woodworking experience if any. I got the mirriors used off E-bay. The parts from hardware store and a sheet of 1/2in plywood. It is one of the coolest things I have evermade I have it out almost every night.  All I have learned is from CN and the net. I have 4 eyepieces that I got from ebay and amazon. The most I payed for one was $23.00. I have found D.S.O. Saturn I can see the rings and the moons the moon is just nuts. The trick was drawing it out on paper and checking your math. I dont think the mirrors care if they are being held by a $100 plywood or $14. They just need to be tight and straight. I have about $130 into it. The point Im making is the attention to detail is how well it will turn out. The info is out there.    Dont know why everything is under lined didnt mean to do that.    


Edited by lonn, 14 September 2019 - 02:56 PM.


#16 Pinbout

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 02:26 PM

Hello

I have been an amateur astronomer for about 3 years. Although I have no experience in constricting things myself, I would like to embark on a project to build my own Dobsonian tube and mount.

Do you have any advice on a book or guide I should start with? I don't want to make mirrors, only structures!

Thanks and clear skies to all

With no experience - I would suggest a tube dob

 

that means stellafane website 


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#17 linuxizer

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 06:44 PM

Stellafane or the original Berry book are the most step by step but also the most crude designs by far.

Kriege and Berry is a good design with more refined construction techniques. If I had to pick one and had a router and more time I'd pick that one. But the concepts are more limited than Highe. They basically give you tables for sizing thighs, but those tables start at 14-16".

Highe gives your equations and concepts but add noted earlier is less nuts and bolts.

#18 Aaron Small

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 08:07 PM

I'd recommend Kriege and Berry as well as the original Berry book for even a more modest dob (I have both).  My first (and currently only) was an 8" using an old Coulter f/6 mirror.  I built mine with the intent of learning so I went with the 8" truss tube versus the solid tube.  I also recommend you build your own cell. (I think mine is 9 point)  It is worth learning.



#19 tommm

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 10:17 PM

Ok, I just made a 8" dob.I used the web site Storm Castle Telescope " How to make a 8" dob. I dont have much woodworking experience if any. I got the mirriors used off E-bay. The parts from hardware store and a sheet of 1/2in plywood. It is one of the coolest things I have evermade I have it out almost every night.  All I have learned is from CN and the net. I have 4 eyepieces that I got from ebay and amazon. The most I payed for one was $23.00. I have found D.S.O. Saturn I can see the rings and the moons the moon is just nuts. The trick was drawing it out on paper and checking your math. I dont think the mirrors care if they are being held by a $100 plywood or $14. They just need to be tight and straight. I have about $130 into it. The point Im making is the attention to detail is how well it will turn out. The info is out there.    Dont know why everything is under lined didnt mean to do that.    

Great return on investment!



#20 Roragi

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 05:39 AM

Undoubtedly book Engineering, design and construction of portable Newtonian telescope, also comes with a CD ROM with spreadsheets to make life easier, But also all the links that were told and even the ATM forum, it is very important to take ideas.




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