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Can you help identifying this jumping spot?

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#1 zurgany

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Posted 13 September 2019 - 06:51 PM

Took 3 shots of 5 seconds exposure each.

I noticed a dot appearing in different place in each shot.

If it were a moving object, it should have generated a line!

So, can you help?

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#2 Don Taylor

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Posted 13 September 2019 - 07:28 PM

How long between each of the 5 second exposures?


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#3 zurgany

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Posted 13 September 2019 - 08:03 PM

How long between each of the 5 second exposures?

About 4 to 5 seconds. I take a shot, look at it for a second or 2 then take another one.



#4 spereira

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 07:45 AM

My guess would be a tumbling satellite.

 

smp


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#5 zurgany

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 08:31 AM

My guess would be a tumbling satellite.

 

smp

So, why it is a dot not a line?



#6 Keith Rivich

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 09:50 AM

Exactly what time did you shoot the images and where are you in the sky?



#7 Don W

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 10:23 AM

Tumbling satellites will appear to blink on and off because one side is less reflective than the other.


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#8 zurgany

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 11:16 AM

Exactly what time did you shoot the images and where are you in the sky?

Was taken August 31, 2019 around 9:40 pm central time.

M 11  in the upper right corner. So, I was facing south.



#9 t_image

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 05:13 PM

Exactly what time did you shoot the images and where are you in the sky?

Was taken August 31, 2019 around 9:40 pm central time.

M 11  in the upper right corner. So, I was facing south.

 

What Keith forgot to also ask, (although location in the sky could be easily determined from the image by a simple plate solve---as that cluster is quite a tell),

is the final piece of information significant to making an observation of something in motion:

 

Where are you on Earth?

 

every other piece of information you have shared has little value without an observational referent location since it would change almost every aspect of the context:

  • location in sky,
  • time of observation,
  • speed of apparent travel.......

Just like the ISS transiting the Moon is only observable along a very narrow track for that time/event

so also any object in relation to something seen.

Note even eclipses are geographically specific events.....

 

There are plenty of tools that can identify satellites specifically, with the complete necessary information,

so people don't have to just guess.

 

I apologize that CN doesn't have a simple form that would make this "what did I see" much easier so important info didn't have to be slowly cajoled from a poster.

 

Note in the still image analysis that the quick flash doesn't have to completely dim, it just has to dim below the limiting magnitude of your exposure.

And note as well the stars have the luxury of exposing for the five seconds while the flash from the object is instantaneous, so it will be much brighter than the stars in the image that seem of comparable brightness....

 

As well, you obviously exposed and processed for your target,

but maybe you may be able to resolve a fainter streak if you re-processed the RAW images with the goal to resolve the moving object..........

 

Who knows, it could be a plane with a bright quick strobe......

Also every permutation of a satellite optical signature is possible:

 

here's a slow tumbler I filmed:

https://www.youtube....h?v=F5gFs-4Zl6w

here's a quick flasher:

https://www.youtube....h?v=7PBwrfwTXUE

and a flasher in sets of three that is almost stationary:

https://www.youtube....h?v=a3gAWZTnL4I

 

all best resolved via full view on a desktop computer in HD....

 

Cheers!


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#10 zurgany

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 06:41 PM

What Keith forgot to also ask, (although location in the sky could be easily determined from the image by a simple plate solve---as that cluster is quite a tell),

is the final piece of information significant to making an observation of something in motion:

 

Where are you on Earth?

 

every other piece of information you have shared has little value without an observational referent location since it would change almost every aspect of the context:

  • location in sky,
  • time of observation,
  • speed of apparent travel.......

Just like the ISS transiting the Moon is only observable along a very narrow track for that time/event

so also any object in relation to something seen.

Note even eclipses are geographically specific events.....

 

There are plenty of tools that can identify satellites specifically, with the complete necessary information,

so people don't have to just guess.

 

I apologize that CN doesn't have a simple form that would make this "what did I see" much easier so important info didn't have to be slowly cajoled from a poster.

 

Note in the still image analysis that the quick flash doesn't have to completely dim, it just has to dim below the limiting magnitude of your exposure.

And note as well the stars have the luxury of exposing for the five seconds while the flash from the object is instantaneous, so it will be much brighter than the stars in the image that seem of comparable brightness....

 

As well, you obviously exposed and processed for your target,

but maybe you may be able to resolve a fainter streak if you re-processed the RAW images with the goal to resolve the moving object..........

 

Who knows, it could be a plane with a bright quick strobe......

Also every permutation of a satellite optical signature is possible:

 

here's a slow tumbler I filmed:

https://www.youtube....h?v=F5gFs-4Zl6w

here's a quick flasher:

https://www.youtube....h?v=7PBwrfwTXUE

and a flasher in sets of three that is almost stationary:

https://www.youtube....h?v=a3gAWZTnL4I

 

all best resolved via full view on a desktop computer in HD....

 

Cheers!

 

What Keith forgot to also ask, (although location in the sky could be easily determined from the image by a simple plate solve---as that cluster is quite a tell),

is the final piece of information significant to making an observation of something in motion:

 

Where are you on Earth?

 

every other piece of information you have shared has little value without an observational referent location since it would change almost every aspect of the context:

  • location in sky,
  • time of observation,
  • speed of apparent travel.......

Just like the ISS transiting the Moon is only observable along a very narrow track for that time/event

so also any object in relation to something seen.

Note even eclipses are geographically specific events.....

 

There are plenty of tools that can identify satellites specifically, with the complete necessary information,

so people don't have to just guess.

 

I apologize that CN doesn't have a simple form that would make this "what did I see" much easier so important info didn't have to be slowly cajoled from a poster.

 

Note in the still image analysis that the quick flash doesn't have to completely dim, it just has to dim below the limiting magnitude of your exposure.

And note as well the stars have the luxury of exposing for the five seconds while the flash from the object is instantaneous, so it will be much brighter than the stars in the image that seem of comparable brightness....

 

As well, you obviously exposed and processed for your target,

but maybe you may be able to resolve a fainter streak if you re-processed the RAW images with the goal to resolve the moving object..........

 

Who knows, it could be a plane with a bright quick strobe......

Also every permutation of a satellite optical signature is possible:

 

here's a slow tumbler I filmed:

https://www.youtube....h?v=F5gFs-4Zl6w

here's a quick flasher:

https://www.youtube....h?v=7PBwrfwTXUE

and a flasher in sets of three that is almost stationary:

https://www.youtube....h?v=a3gAWZTnL4I

 

all best resolved via full view on a desktop computer in HD....

 

Cheers!

Thank you for your reply!

These are raw shots I had to crop and put to GIF file to be able to upload here.

These were taken from latitude: 35.710647 and longitude: -86.91837319999999

That is Spring Hill, Tennessee in the United States of America.

I tried to process the original images, but they did not reveal anything but a solid dot.

I did check your youTube video, it is interesting! Thanks for sharing!

 

Thank you,


Edited by zurgany, 14 September 2019 - 06:48 PM.


#11 Tony Flanders

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 07:22 PM

The fact that your spot is much fainter in the central shot than in the other two is definitely consistent with the tumbling-satellite theory. My guess is that you're catching a direct reflection of the Sun off a shiny surface, much like an Iridium flare but on a shorter timescale. That would explain why the satellite only shines extremely briefly each time it comes around -- too briefly to make a line.


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