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Friday the 13th Full moon- did you observe it?

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#1 Tyson M

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 11:49 AM

I was out last night with my maksutov catching some lunar views! 

 

The seeing was listed as bad seeing 2/5 transitioning to average seeing 3/5 - mostly clear - mostly transparent - backyard red/white zone-  22:30 to 01:30

 

With my mak cooling in its bag for hours and the moon higher up now clearing my house, I initially set at one part in the yard, to catch a small observing window  until a tree obstructed my view, then I had to move my mount to another location for the duration of the night to view around the tree so to speak.

 

The views were blinding bright with the 48mm brandon @ 83x mag and 2.4 exit pupil. The seeing wasn't ideal but the Mak was stable and putting up some good views.  This eyepiece is perhaps one of, or my favorite all time eyepiece for DSO's and lunar viewing.  Razor sharp porthole into space, with long focal length scopes.  Can cause blackouts with excessive eye relief but you get use to it.

 

I spent two hours looking at the disk, 3 hrs total outside  ending at 01:30 but I took a 45 min break to go inside and eat.

 

I usually focusing in on the cratered northern top of the moon.  Pythagoras with its central peak was particularly nice. Carpenter, Philolaus C and Anaxagoras were dominating the view.

 

Another crater that drew me in was Harpalus with its etched rim.  As you get closer in from the lunar disk, contrast seems to drop a bit.  Not much, but the full moon slightly washes out contrast on the face on features I find, with any scope.  That's why I use a 1.25" Lumicon orange filter in smaller scopes, especially when near fully illuminated.

 

Regardless, my standard for focusing was using Plato and Sinus Iridum.  By 01:00 the seeing was starting to stabilize.  Now we are talking.  Before, after trying the 32, 24, and 16 Brandon's, I found the conditions warranted only the 48. 

 

With the seeing turning into only the slightest of waviness, now the 32 could come out to play and be aesthetically pleasing. Sometimes the 24mm for 166x mag.

 

With the 32 and sometimes the 48, I could see a feature in plato.  I think this is the first for me.  Not sure what it was, when I tried to use a higher power it didn't really support it to well. It might have been craterlets B and C , almost seen as one from this far away(with the 48mm @ 83x). Or, it was craterlet A.

 

I studied the terraced semi-circle rim of Sinus Iridum, moved down to Montes Apenninus.  This feature really deserves a terminator, like in the first quarter phase.  Contrast wasn't jumping out at me, just identification.  Really, the only thing that could have made this night better was being in any phase besides fully illuminated.

 

I did however observe the ray structures for quite some time.  With and without the Lumicon light yellow or the neutral density 25% filters, the ray structures were contrasty and pleasing.  Tyco, Kepler and Copernicus showing off in all their glory.

 

I could see central peaks in 2 out of the 3, none in Kepler.

 

After this, I packed it and went inside.

 

 

Let's hear how your night went.  Did you observe the moon? If so, what equipment did you use, what features did you see?


Edited by Tyson M, 14 September 2019 - 11:59 AM.

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#2 Scott in NC

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 11:55 AM

Nice report, Tyson!  Alas, I was clouded out, but I'm glad to hear that someone was out there having fun.


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#3 Cali

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 11:59 AM

127 mm Mak

Arcturus Binoviewer

Polarizing Filter

 

Skies clear. On and off clocked in about 7 hours of lunar viewing.

 

- Cal


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#4 Ken Watts

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 12:27 PM

Clear but hazy skies last night. The moon was brilliant.  I only saw it when I looked up while going out to my car at 10:30 mst.  I was too beat up by the day when I got home to do any more than eat supper and have a couple glasses of wine. 


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#5 Tyson M

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 12:38 PM

127 mm Mak

Arcturus Binoviewer

Polarizing Filter

 

Skies clear. On and off clocked in about 7 hours of lunar viewing.

 

- Cal

7 hours!!! Nice bow.gif



#6 Tyson M

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 12:40 PM

Clear but hazy skies last night. The moon was brilliant.  I only saw it when I looked up while going out to my car at 10:30 mst.  I was too beat up by the day when I got home to do any more than eat supper and have a couple glasses of wine. 

I have been there.  Full moon plus hazy skies don't exactly scream out to me either. 



#7 Cali

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 01:34 PM

7 hours!!! Nice bow.gif

I'll be doing it again tonight. If similar to last night, the view is just too good to pass up. Over the course of a night its interesting to see crater rims light up and then dim out. I have to find a more detailed on-line lunar map.

 

- Call


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#8 bridgman

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 09:36 AM

Friday night was rain & clouds. Last night was OK - took out the AT1010 for a while, but brightness was painful even with an ND25 filter. Started with 12mm Delos without filter, then 5mm Radian, then eventually found the ND25 filter and tried that. Fortunately I also found a bottle of ROR and was able to get all the accumulated gunk off the filter. 

 

One interesting thing was that the false colour seemed much more noticeable with the Radian than the Delos, more than I would have expected just from the magnification difference. Will experiment some more tonight and try either the C8 or the ED72, and see if Barlow + 5mm Radian + AT1010 gets the brightness down enough. 

 

If I can find a polarizing filter in the camera bag I'll try rotating that in front of the eyepiece as well... I gather a single polarizer in conjunction with a diagonal might work. Need to figure out where adjustable polarizers go in the system, since the obvious place (end of the eyepiece) is inaccessible when viewing... I guess you pop the eyepiece out, adjust, and put it back ? 

 

I wasn't able to view long enough to look at a lot of specific details, but one pleasant surprise was that along the fully lit edge of the moon I was able to see what appeared to be mountains sticking out from the edge of the disk. Don't know why I never noticed them before; maybe it was just the first time I tried to have most of the lunar disk out of the FOV simply because it was too bright, and that let me concentrate on the edge more. Need to go find a lunar map and figure out what I'm looking at. 

 

EDIT - oh hey, Google Moon is a thing


Edited by bridgman, 15 September 2019 - 09:53 AM.

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#9 NorthernlatAK

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 11:06 AM

Google moon... is there "street view" from the rovers' perspective?


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