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#1 Mike G.

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 10:17 PM

so, I've been unable to view anything for several weeks and the 80mm Lunt SS is still a pretty new piece to me.but today things pretty much fell together.  I just got back in country yesterday evening and haven't been doing any observations, day or night.  last night my first night back was clouded out but today was sunny, albeit with plenty of big fluffys floating by on a regular basis.  in between however was nice blue sky.  so the Lunt came out and got mounted on the CG5 whilst I was doing chores.  I recently bought a zoom since it seems everyone with a solar scope does zooms.  being from the dark side (night time astronomy), I have always shunned zooms in favor of wide FOV EP's and was reluctant to buy one for the Lunt but it seemed that everyone who did visual Solar used them.  so a couple weeks ago I bought a Vixen 8-24 LV zoom.and put it in the case with the Lunt.

 

as the clouds came and went, I would stop, run over to the scope and see what was going on - today was a really active day!  at one point I counted 10 large proms going on! and when the clouds were not interfering, the atmosphere was cooperating and for the better part of the afternoon I was in the 60-70x range.  as the day progressed, it became quite clear that a zoom was a major advantage with solar viewing.  as the atmospheric conditions change, you simply increase or decrease mag to, get the best image.  several times at 70x, I was just blown away with the detail of the proms I could see. not having to change the EP was an incredible convenience!  about 3:30, I finsihed my chores and the skies had cleared significantly so I sat down, put my eyepatch on and my hood and got serious.  I was at the EP for at least an hour and a half just watching proms form, enlarge, and die.  truly an amazing experience!!  and without the need to change EP's out, like I do at night, it was a real game changer.

 

a fantastic day with long periods of steady air and lots and lots of giant proms to watch, and I never changed the EP once! 

 

I kinda doubt I'll be switching to zooms at night, I really like my 82* EP's but for solar, there's just one eyepiece in the case now and that's all I need.


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#2 MAURITS

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 03:44 AM

I use always a zoom EP for sun observation.



#3 JMKarian

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 05:44 AM

Mike,

Glad you had a great session - and I agree with you about zooms for solar viewing.   My Lunt zoom  has served me well on a 100Ha/B1800 scope.



#4 Eddgie

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 08:03 AM

Very happy that you are enjoying the solar scope and zoom.  I too use a Lunt 80 and I really love it.

 

I started using a zoom for solar many years ago and raved about how fantastic they were for solar observing (while I probably don't deserve the credit, it was not long after this that Lunt started shipping their scopes with zoom eyepieces).

 

I found that these benefits carry over to night time solar system observing as well, and now I use zooms for all solar system observing.

 

If you want to ditch the hood, I have another suggestion for you.   I live in a very hot environment and I refuse to wear a hood.  My preferred method of dealing with daylight is to use a winged eye guard.

 

Now the problem with this is that one thing that makes the zoom so great is that you can very quickly change zoom settings for higher power when you see some improved seeing, but if you are using a winged eye guard, on most zooms, the eye guard will rotate when the zoom is zoomed and this means you would have to loosen the eyepiece, hold the zoom in place, and rotate the zoom mechanism, then tighten the eyepiece.  And imagine doing this with Binoviewers!

 

My solution is to use a zoom that has a fixed top so that when I zoom, the eye guards stay in their fixed location!  Now, I can simply zoom the eyepiece in and continue observing.  No hood, and I can get it darker than a hood, and I only wear a wide brimmed had for shade.

 

So, consider using an zoom  ( or zooms) that don't rotate the top with an eye guard to block light.  

 

BVZ.jpg


Edited by Eddgie, 15 September 2019 - 10:44 AM.

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#5 cptbobrfh

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 09:21 AM

I would like Daystar to make a zoom for the Quark,using 25mm,32mm,and 40mm adjustment clicks. I would buy it in a heartbeat if the folks at Daystar would be so kind as to make one! Jen,Fred,are ya listening?

Edited by cptbobrfh, 15 September 2019 - 09:22 AM.


#6 Mike G.

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 01:00 PM

Very happy that you are enjoying the solar scope and zoom.  I too use a Lunt 80 and I really love it.

 

I started using a zoom for solar many years ago and raved about how fantastic they were for solar observing (while I probably don't deserve the credit, it was not long after this that Lunt started shipping their scopes with zoom eyepieces).

 

I found that these benefits carry over to night time solar system observing as well, and now I use zooms for all solar system observing.

 

If you want to ditch the hood, I have another suggestion for you.   I live in a very hot environment and I refuse to wear a hood.  My preferred method of dealing with daylight is to use a winged eye guard.

 

Now the problem with this is that one thing that makes the zoom so great is that you can very quickly change zoom settings for higher power when you see some improved seeing, but if you are using a winged eye guard, on most zooms, the eye guard will rotate when the zoom is zoomed and this means you would have to loosen the eyepiece, hold the zoom in place, and rotate the zoom mechanism, then tighten the eyepiece.  And imagine doing this with Binoviewers!

 

My solution is to use a zoom that has a fixed top so that when I zoom, the eye guards stay in their fixed location!  Now, I can simply zoom the eyepiece in and continue observing.  No hood, and I can get it darker than a hood, and I only wear a wide brimmed had for shade.

 

So, consider using an zoom  ( or zooms) that don't rotate the top with an eye guard to block light.  

 

attachicon.gif BVZ.jpg

The Vixen is a fixed top zoom and has a nice long eye cup that I can jam my eye socket right into, blocking a lot of stray light. I also wear a hat at times and the hood does get hot. But the hood delivers the best contrast, hands down, IMO. It seems there’s no “painless” time to do any kind of astronomy. Mosquitoes in the summer, freezing temps in the winter, light pollution, jet stream, the moon, clouds, etc. I got into solar to be able to effectively double my time at the EP observing our universe and the incredible wonders it presents. The Lunt has done that beyond what I had expected. It seems that our own star is quite amazing in its own right. 


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#7 MalVeauX

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 02:03 PM

I would like Daystar to make a zoom for the Quark,using 25mm,32mm,and 40mm adjustment clicks. I would buy it in a heartbeat if the folks at Daystar would be so kind as to make one! Jen,Fred,are ya listening?

I would certainly like a 32~11mm zoom. Should be possible to make. I wouldn't want a 40mm though, there's no advantage to it for solar over a 32mm as its the same FOV in a 1.25" system and the sun is plenty bright.

 

Very best,



#8 BeltofOrion

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 10:01 AM

The Vixen is a fixed top zoom and has a nice long eye cup that I can jam my eye socket right into, blocking a lot of stray light. I also wear a hat at times and the hood does get hot. But the hood delivers the best contrast, hands down, IMO. It seems there’s no “painless” time to do any kind of astronomy. Mosquitoes in the summer, freezing temps in the winter, light pollution, jet stream, the moon, clouds, etc. I got into solar to be able to effectively double my time at the EP observing our universe and the incredible wonders it presents. The Lunt has done that beyond what I had expected. It seems that our own star is quite amazing in its own right. 

Have you ever hit the nail square on the head with this post!  Freezing temps, mosquitoes (and black flies), clouds ... especially up this way. I'm new to solar, but it certainly has added a whole new dimension to this hobby.



#9 cptbobrfh

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 10:46 AM

I would certainly like a 32~11mm zoom. Should be possible to make. I wouldn't want a 40mm though, there's no advantage to it for solar over a 32mm as its the same FOV in a 1.25" system and the sun is plenty bright.
 
Very best,

Well stated,Marty- yeah,I could go for a 11mm -32mm zoom as well. Maybe 11mm-22mm-33mm zoom would be about perfect for the Quark!




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