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Lanyards,faith,birds mess and overall treatment.

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22 replies to this topic

#1 Steve Napier

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 09:00 AM

A good days observing was had yesterday 18/06/06 at Tynemouth,where I spent several hours obseving the birds beside the shore.
Whilst on the way home it struck me just how lucky I was.
I thought nothing of it at the time but,I could have easily been bombarded by the local seagulls doing their buisness all over my objectives.What do you do in a situation like this,apart from trying to catch the culprit and ring its neck.
Then it struck me just how much faith we put in our lanyards,I mean we are walking around with expensive gear strapped round our necks and just a tiny lug exposing from the body of our binoculars and a thin piece of material acting as a strap.
Then there"s the actual air itself,god only knows what type of pollutants are in that this day and age {I pity the Chinese}.
Now,I know what you are all thinking,"Steve,what if I fall in the sea whilst obseving?"
I live with this fear on a daily basis,well,Swarovski have a wonderful lanyard that acts as a life- bouy,its bouyant so I pressume its full of air,what a wonderful idea.
I don"t know about you but,I treat my binoculars as though they are the crown jewels,recently reading some of the posts on cloudy days I was astonished to find some people keeping their instruments, under car seats! Can you believe that?
I always check both objectives and eyepieces before I cap them,do you?
I recently saw a photograph of a well know British wildlife television presenter [Bill Oddie} crawling around on the beach with objectives uncapped and sand all over them,they were Leica Ultavids too.
So, thats the end of this tutorial,I hope you have all learned to take a bit more care of your binoculars.
Steve.

#2 edwincjones

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 06:43 PM

sorry Steve,

but binoculars are "just a tool" to help us see better

edj

#3 Glassthrower

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 08:38 PM

I don"t know about you but,I treat my binoculars as though they are the crown jewels,recently reading some of the posts on cloudy days I was astonished to find some people keeping their instruments, under car seats! Can you believe that?
I always check both objectives and eyepieces before I cap them,do you?
I recently saw a photograph of a well know British wildlife television presenter [Bill Oddie} crawling around on the beach with objectives uncapped and sand all over them,they were Leica Ultavids too.


I often wipe the lens of my Takahashi Astronomer 22x60 with a dirty cotton t-shirt that I keep for just that occasion.

I need to get down by the water more....

MikeG

#4 ngc6475

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 08:48 PM

"I don"t know about you but,I treat my binoculars as though they are the crown jewels,recently reading some of the posts on cloudy days I was astonished to find some people keeping their instruments, under car seats! Can you believe that?"

I'm with you, Steve. I was taught by me father to care for my tools. As a result, I am very careful with my binoculars and other equipment. I believe that, if the thing brings you some measure of joy and satisfaction, you should care for it and treat it with respect. Ultravids in the sand? Unconscionable!

#5 btschumy

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 09:22 PM

I was on a butterfly hike recently with a world-renowned birder/butterflyer. He had some $1600 Brunton Epoch binoculars. I just cringed as I saw him polish the objectives in the field with a corner of his shirt.

#6 refractory

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 09:31 PM

Yes but it was a VERY expensive shirt.

Jess Tauber

#7 Bob W6PU

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 10:03 PM

My gold prospecting partner is like that, he keeps his "Bushnel" 8X30 under the seat of his jeep, with no protection!

When I remarked to him that they were badly out of collimation, he didn't seem to notice, said that they were fine for him! :lol:

When I take mine with me to the desert, in my travel trailer, I lay them on the bed between to pillows!

Bob in NM

#8 ChrisR

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Posted 20 June 2006 - 12:36 AM

Bob you would not believe how many people I have worked with who say, " I don't see anything wtong." even when you can see 2 completely different images between the tubes. Add in the fishermen who wipe their binoculars with their fish scale encrusted shirts, and wonder why the coatings are scratched up. Go figure huh.

Peace,
Chris

#9 Steve Napier

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Posted 20 June 2006 - 03:11 AM

I don"t even like people LOOKING,at my binoculars,I don"t mean THROUGH them,just AT them.
Their vision might do something bad!
Steve.

#10 SaberScorpX

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Posted 20 June 2006 - 04:16 AM

Gotta admit. I don't like letting the general public use my best glass.
But visitors can look at them all they want. I keep them clean and on display in the house when not in use.

I have a few 'more expendable' good quality binos relegated to SSS (smudge, slobber, sneeze) outreach duty.



Stephen Saber
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#11 Steve Napier

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Posted 20 June 2006 - 04:47 AM

Stephen,I will be over yours later tonight,I"ll bring the beer"s.
I think with some people its the fact that they don"t respect their glasses"s.
Some people reckon they are merely a tool,I don"t.
Steve.

#12 EdZ

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Posted 20 June 2006 - 05:26 AM

I don"t even like people LOOKING,at my binoculars,I don"t mean THROUGH them,just AT them.
Their vision might do something bad!



Gotta admit. I don't like letting the general public use my best glass.
But visitors can look at them all they want. I keep them clean and on display in the house when not in use.

I have a few 'more expendable' good quality binos relegated to SSS (smudge, slobber, sneeze) outreach duty.



I don't share that particular attitude. When I hold observing events for groups all the equipment comes out equally. I might reserve a cheap 7x35 to hand to an 8 year old rather than the Nikon SE, but the Nikons and Fujinons and BT100 are all set up side by side with the TV85 and the Nagler. Everybody gets to look thru everything.

edz

#13 edwincjones

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Posted 20 June 2006 - 05:36 AM

I guess I will not be invited over for beer.

The beauty of binoculars is what you can do with them, what you can see. It is really not the brand name, the style or finish, the smell, the dust free optics. I can tolerate a little bird mess to see a rare species, those binoculars under the truch seat will be available when I need them, I do cringe when someone at a public star party touches them but also enjoy the wows from the touchers seeing the moon or Jupitor with its moons.

Binoculars-use them!

edj

#14 Joad

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Posted 20 June 2006 - 10:20 AM

I cannot recall her name, but the distinguished birder who wrote a column about premium binoculars on a site that one of our members here at CN linked us to not so long ago made an interesting remark about the cost of binoculars. She wrote that if one's binoculars are so expensive that one fears to go out in the field and use them, then they may not be such a good buy. This is all relative, of course. The television naturalist crawling through the sand with his Leicas may well be given his binoculars as a sort of celebrity endorsement, so they are "cheap" to him. Similarly, someone blessed with high levels of serotonin and/or income may feel less worry over an expensive glass than someone for whom that glass may be financially irreplaceable. I've got the cash, but not the serotonin, so I am quite obsessive about caring for my optics and hestitate to spend too much for fear that I wouldn't use them. That's one reason I keep my equipment modest.

My point, however, is that the whole thing is completely relative. I rather envy those who do not worry about "mess" and sympathize with those who do. Either form of behavior harms no one. The only harm comes in if someone like me were to have a premium instrument "messed" (I'd simply lose my mind) or if someone who didn't worry so much were to miss out on a viewing opportunity only to avoid some dirt.

#15 KennyJ

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Posted 20 June 2006 - 10:51 AM

I find it ironic that a Zeiss binocular owner such as Steve Napier ought to be making such a big deal about objective caps and objective covers .

The celebrated Zeiss 7 x 42 BGAT Classics came supplied brand new with NEITHER ! :-)

Just one of those dreadful one - piece " rainguards " for the oculars , which are anything but dustproof !

Regards , Kenny

#16 ngc6475

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Posted 20 June 2006 - 10:27 PM

"...if one's binoculars are so expensive that one fears to go out in the field and use them, then they may not be such a good buy."

I think there is more than a little truth in that statement. The point of owning fine optics is enjoying them as often as one can. I do believe, however, that there is a distinction between use and abuse and, therefore, there is is no shame in treating one's equipment with care and respect. I don't take seriously the idea of a wannabe-naturalist dragging his Leicas across a beach for the sake of a photo opportunity, but I personally would never do that with my least expensive binoculars. Ack! I have gladly shared my best Nikons and Fujinons with children and adults on nature walks and/or at star parties, but smearing rough clothing across the glass or carelessly chucking them under the seat of my pickup without protection makes me grit my teeth at the very thought of it!

#17 ChrisR

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Posted 20 June 2006 - 11:44 PM

I would like to point out that now many premium binoculars come with a lifetime no fault warranty.

Hope that thought helps.

Peace,
Chris

#18 Steve Napier

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Posted 21 June 2006 - 04:00 AM

Ed,I will buy you a beer ANYTIME,but,it will have to be a European beer,none of that American rubbish.How about a good German pilsner?
Edz,I appreciate your comments about setting up binoculars for groups to observe through,unfortunately,where I live it wouldn"t be possible.
I could try but,I have a feeling the only gear I would be left with would be a tripod adapter,if that lucky!
Oh,to live in a nice area.
Steve.

#19 sparrow

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Posted 21 June 2006 - 07:51 AM

My point, however, is that the whole thing is completely relative.


A case in point...

Last year I guided a birder who had come a long way to see a rare bird I
had sighted.

When we came close to where the bird should be he put on his glasses in
order to see as perfectly as possible. The trouble was the eyecup on his
Leica BAs wouldn't go down even with a lot of pressure. Without
hesitation he banged the eyecup on the Leica against a tree driving the
eyecup down.

Driving home I suggested that perhaps he was being a little hard on his
glass. He said he had taken a weeks leave from work without pay, paid for
a round trip airfare of 2000 miles, paid for a rental car, hotel and
motels and eating out and that his kid was in hospital for minor surgery
and he wouldn't be there. His question to me was- "do you think I'm
going to let a god-d**ned eyecup stop me from seeing what I came to see?

It all depends upon where you are coming from I guess.

BTW he did see what he came for and the guy went home a happy camper.

#20 Les

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Posted 21 June 2006 - 08:28 AM

Ed,I will buy you a beer ANYTIME,but,it will have to be a European beer,none of that American rubbish.

Steve,

Sorry that none of our good stuff makes it over your way. There was a time when American wines didn't get any respect either.

Cheers,
Les

#21 Steve Napier

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Posted 23 June 2006 - 03:14 AM

Les,what do you mean "good stuff"?
Are you telling me America produces "good" beer?
Come on,even Im not that daft!
Steve. :tomatodance:

#22 Les

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Posted 23 June 2006 - 08:51 AM

Are you telling me America produces "good" beer?

Steve,

Why did I know that response was coming? :smirk:
Actually I don't know that "America" produces any beer. But good beer can be had at micro breweries/local taverns. In my local area, Baltimore Brewing Co. comes to mind as well as Fordham brewery/Ramshead Inn. Brewmasters there have apprenticed in Germany. As for the bottled stuff, I don't know what micro brews make it your way through the export route so I can't comment on that. With globalization, any beer ingredient (hops variety,spices,etc.) is available to the brewmaster so that only his/her imagination and talent is the limit. No one country holds the "secret" to making beer although the popularity of certain styles does vary from one to the next. Bitter beer is not widely popular here.

But you knew all that, right Steve :grin:

Cheers,
Les

#23 Steve Napier

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Posted 24 June 2006 - 03:34 AM

Yes,of course Les.
I think Belgium comes close to a country that holds a secret for good beer,their brews are really top notch.
I believe they have well over 500 breweries,which is amazing when you consider you could fit Belgium into the Rose Bowl.
Not too hot on binoculars nowadays the Belgiums,must be all that beer.
Cheers Les,
Steve.


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