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Moonlit Nights

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#1 rgsalinger

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 10:26 AM

When the moon is up, can I still do planetary imaging? Do I need to use some kind of moon filter. I've been a long exposure DSO imager now for 9 years and I'm thinking of what things I can do on nights when the moon is out other than narrow band. Is there a good book to read on planetary imaging?

 

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#2 Hesiod

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 10:52 AM

You do not need any kind of Moon filter, but. given how low are Jupiter and Saturn, it would be a nice idea to shot them LRGB anyway.

Especially for Jupiter I find really helpful an IR-pass because can take pictures of the fuzzy gas ball even when it is very low or amidst bad seeing.

 

Or can put the 12.5" at work for a nice Moon mosaic, and solve for a while the Moonlit night issuelol.gif



#3 kevinbreen

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 11:00 AM

When the moon is up, can I still do planetary imaging? Do I need to use some kind of moon filter. I've been a long exposure DSO imager now for 9 years and I'm thinking of what things I can do on nights when the moon is out other than narrow band. Is there a good book to read on planetary imaging?

 

Rgrds-Ross

On the contrary, you can image the planets under a streetlight, or in daylight as some people have. The other evening I imaged Jupiter at sundown when it was still bright. It came out pretty well. So no, you don't need a Moon filter. Planetary targets are so much brighter than DSOs anyway that the effect of moonlight is neglible if not zero.


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#4 RedLionNJ

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 05:21 PM

Depends what specific targets.

 

Uranus and Neptune need darker skies, else the contrast just isn't there. An IR610 filter helps a bit, too.

 

Jupiter and Saturn are totally unaffected by moonlight, unless the moon is extremely close (within 5 degrees, say).

 

Get out there and enjoy the experience!




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