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#1 Dalew

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 09:21 PM

Dale here!

 

Celestron XLT102 AZ arrived at approx. 6:15 this evening.  After 2 mile nightly walk, supper and "some assembly" that was required, I headed out about 9-ish to give the beast a quick test run.  No grand expectations since I had not even figured out the finder scope and was not really ready for prime time. No chair, street lights shining bright, accessory tray not even attached.  Only the 25x Plossl eyepiece that came with the scope.  But at least the Tampa suburban sky was cooperating with at least a few stars, and the moon not yet up.   So here goes nothin!

 

Just hoping to find SOMETHING in the field of view, I decided to go for Jupiter since it was the brightest body up there and seemed to line up with my stellarium sky.   I was not expecting much since the lights of Tampa are to the south, right where Jupiter was perched.  Took a few minutes, and I actually did give the finder scope a try, and suddenly, there was a bright blurry ball in the eyepiece.  Hey, this finder scope thing is a pretty slick idea!

 

Then I started focusing.   ...Oops!  Wrong way.   Reversed and slowly turned as the ball got smaller and smaller and smaller, and suddenly, there it was!   Jupiter with 4 gleaming moons just hanging out there in my backyard.

 

Bolstered by that beautiful sight, I decided to give Saturn a shot, again not expecting much.  But after a while I did manage to zero in.  It might have been wishful thinking but I do believe it showed up slightly oval, with one moon quite a way to the right, and just the hint of rings visible.  Is that possible or was I imagining that I could see it?  

 

Any way you slice it, I'm a happy girl.   It was more than I was hoping to see on my first try.  What a thrill!

 

Thanks to all for the advice and gobs of information on this site that have helped me get back to the starry skies.   

 

Tomorrow, my Barlow 2X and my 10X Plossl eyepiece arrive.   Can't wait to give those crazy planets another look!

 

Once I get more time with the scope I will be back with a more detailed report, and maybe some more questions.

 

One thing I haven't figured out is how to get the up and down gross movement of the OTA.  It swivels very easily but I had to use the AZ slow mo up and down nob to raise and lower.   Is that the way it works or am I missing something? 

 

Thanks again!  I will be dreaming of stars at work tomorrow.

 

Dale


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#2 PPPPPP42

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 09:38 PM

You should be able to see the stripes of Jupiters major bands and the rings of Saturn clearly once your new stuff shows up.

If its just a bright fuzzy ball "seeing" (atmosphere stability you are looking through) is screwing up your view. I don't think a refractor that size would have much of an issue with cool down.

EDIT: A link to help:

https://www.skyandte...ing-the-seeing/

 

Concerning the az mount I have never used one but there are supposed to be slip clutches on both axis so you may have to turn knobs or potentially even adjust bolts or something to get the tension right so they slip but not swing freely.


Edited by PPPPPP42, 17 September 2019 - 09:43 PM.

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#3 wrnchhead

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 11:28 PM

Great that you had success! Is it this scope? https://www.celestro...omni-xlt-az-102

 

The manual says "MOVING THE TELESCOPE

The Omni AZ mount has slip clutches in both axes. To make large movements with the telescope, simply hold the optical
tube and push it in the desired direction. To make fine adjustments or to track celestial objects, turn both slow motion
knobs."

 

Hopefully that helps. 



#4 tog

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 08:25 AM

"Thanks again!  I will be dreaming of stars at work tomorrow." Awesome! This is what it's all about!



#5 sg6

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 10:43 AM

Guess you need a bit more magnification for Saturn, you should have seen rings but you say 25mm eyepiece and so that will be fairly low magnification. Presume you are anticipating others?

 

Think I last saw Saturn on a 102/600 with a 12mm (50x) or 8mm (75x).

 

If I recall I was using the tube rings as a simple sight/finder - worked better then expected. lol.gif lol.gif

 

When better set up with the finder try M13 the globular cluser in Hercules. You will have to aim at where it is (supposed to be), can confirm with binoculars first however.

And there are the nice doubles of Almaak and Albireo, which are worth getting.

 

Scope is a nice size and reasonable f number (f/6.5) my Bresser is f/6, similar enough.

 

At this time it is likely worth thinking about a solar filter for the Mercury transit. If you do then do not forget the finder, take care of that or remove it. It will be a sort of "Tick another off the list" but not sure when the next one is. And why not - bought scope, seen Jupiter, seen Saturn, saw Mercury transit the sun.


Edited by sg6, 18 September 2019 - 10:55 AM.


#6 Starman27

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 10:57 AM

Dale, thanks for your first light report. These reports are important because they share the excitement, joy and questions.


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#7 tog

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 11:25 AM

Dale, thanks for your first light report. These reports are important because they share the excitement, joy and questions.

Most of us think of this as just a hobby, but I think it goes much farther than that. Each of us out there viewing contributes in some way to the science of astronomy. And Starman27 is right, such reports keep the rest of us excited and ready to ask questions about our universe. 


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#8 Dalew

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 07:47 PM

Great that you had success! Is it this scope? https://www.celestro...omni-xlt-az-102

 

The manual says "MOVING THE TELESCOPE

The Omni AZ mount has slip clutches in both axes. To make large movements with the telescope, simply hold the optical
tube and push it in the desired direction. To make fine adjustments or to track celestial objects, turn both slow motion
knobs."

 

Hopefully that helps. 

Thanks, Eric.  Yes, that is how read it too, but the up and down isn't doing that.  Somebody suggested I may need to loosen something that is screwed down too tight. I might get in touch with Celestron customer service to make sure I do it right.



#9 Mountaineer370

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 08:20 AM

Bolstered by that beautiful sight, I decided to give Saturn a shot, again not expecting much.  But after a while I did manage to zero in.  It might have been wishful thinking but I do believe it showed up slightly oval, with one moon quite a way to the right, and just the hint of rings visible.  Is that possible or was I imagining that I could see it?  

 

 

Tomorrow, my Barlow 2X and my 10X Plossl eyepiece arrive.   Can't wait to give those crazy planets another look!

Welcome to the hobby of astronomy.  I am so pleased that you are having fun!

 

Hmm, Saturn in a four-inch refractor, even in light-polluted skies, should show more than "just the hint of rings visible."  Seeing Saturn with its rings should actually knock your socks off.  There should be no doubt that you are looking at the ringed planet.  Try again over a few nights to be sure.

 

Remember that more magnification is not always better.  I'm not sure I would want to Barlow a 10mm Plossl in your skies. Try it, of course, but your equipment and/or your seeing conditions may not support that kind of magnification.  You may find you like the 10mm Plossl better by itself.  You may also find that the Barlow works fine with your 25mm Plossl.

 

We'll be looking forward to more reports from you!



#10 desertstars

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 09:42 AM

 

Just hoping to find SOMETHING in the field of view, I decided to go for Jupiter...

This was the First Light object for the first telescope I ever bought for myself, many years ago. cool.gif



#11 rajilina

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 09:57 AM

Welcome to the hobby of astronomy.  I am so pleased that you are having fun!

 

Hmm, Saturn in a four-inch refractor, even in light-polluted skies, should show more than "just the hint of rings visible."  Seeing Saturn with its rings should actually knock your socks off.  There should be no doubt that you are looking at the ringed planet.  Try again over a few nights to be sure.

 

Remember that more magnification is not always better.  I'm not sure I would want to Barlow a 10mm Plossl in your skies. Try it, of course, but your equipment and/or your seeing conditions may not support that kind of magnification.  You may find you like the 10mm Plossl better by itself.  You may also find that the Barlow works fine with your 25mm Plossl.

 

We'll be looking forward to more reports from you!

+1. 

 

I have found this to be true also, Barlowing a 10mm doesn't guarantee a better view. 



#12 clintmk89

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 11:31 AM

My first object with that exact scope was Jupiter as well, glad to hear your enjoying it! It’s a fun DSO scope as well when/if you decide to grab some wide field EP’s. Nothing more fun than a super light refractor you can take anywhere on the go. :)


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