Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

What Hardware to Make PI Really Fast?

  • Please log in to reply
103 replies to this topic

#1 PirateMike

PirateMike

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 2649
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2013
  • Loc: A Green Dot On A Blue Sea

Posted 17 September 2019 - 11:08 PM

I'm not sure if this is the forum to place this thread, so move it if you think I'll have a better chance at a full response.

 

 

I have a pretty good desktop computer for processing AP but I know I can have better. It has in Intel 6700K processor and 32 gigs of ram and space for 32 gigs more, the hard drive is an SSD, but I would like to make it faster by adding some hardware.

 

I also intend to make the changes ASAP, like yesterday! wink.gif

 

I'm thinking to add three more SSD dedicated for "file swapping" (is that what it's called?) but I don't know if I should get the 2.5" or the M.2 form factor. Is one faster than the other?

 

What else can I do to make this machine faster? Add more ram? Replace the ram with faster sticks? Rebuild with a newer and faster processor? Anything else? Am I heading in the right direction?

 

Please tell me what you think will work the best at making this machine noticeably faster when processing with PixInsite.

 

I would like to keep the upgrade/rebuild under $1200 but preferably much lower if possible while still looking for the biggest bang for my buck.

 

Your input will be certainly be considered (as you probably know better than I) and I will update this thread with everything that is done.

 

 

Thanks,

 

Miguel   8-)

 

.


Edited by PirateMike, 17 September 2019 - 11:09 PM.


#2 dhaval

dhaval

    Vendor

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 1737
  • Joined: 21 Jul 2008
  • Loc: Round Rock, TX

Posted 17 September 2019 - 11:30 PM

PI loves cores and RAM (the more the better) and Linux (it is slightly faster, but whether that is worth it will be/should be your call). M2 type SSD helps as well. 

 

I'd say at least 8 cores/16 threads (AMD Ryzen is real value for money). At least 32GB RAM. If you plan to stick with Windows, get more RAM (like 64GB) and use some of that as RAMDisk. That helps. 

 

CS! 


  • PirateMike likes this

#3 Monkeybird747

Monkeybird747

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 561
  • Joined: 31 Aug 2017
  • Loc: Louisville, KY

Posted 17 September 2019 - 11:35 PM

Dhaval beat me to it. I just built a dedicated machine for PI processing. It cost about $1800 to build from scratch, but there is probably room to trim the fat if you have some components that you can reuse.

Strictly speaking about Pixinsight, two or three things will have significant impacts on your processing speed. It is optimized for Linux, loves AMD multicore/multi-thread processors, and needs a fast place for swap files. The 16 core threadrippers are very popular. The 12 core is also a great performer for pixinsight.


  • PirateMike likes this

#4 PirateMike

PirateMike

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 2649
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2013
  • Loc: A Green Dot On A Blue Sea

Posted 17 September 2019 - 11:48 PM

I have just completed a bench mark in PI here are the results...

 

Benchmark - Baseline.png

 

And here are the reported benchmark results on the PI website for my processor and my PI build...

 

PixInsight Benchmark Reports.png

 

It seems that my machine is the slowest of the bunch... that's me at number 11. I'm the last place winner. frown.gif

 

So that's where I am at now.

 

 

Miguel   8-)

 

.



#5 PirateMike

PirateMike

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 2649
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2013
  • Loc: A Green Dot On A Blue Sea

Posted 17 September 2019 - 11:52 PM

PI loves cores and RAM (the more the better) and Linux (it is slightly faster, but whether that is worth it will be/should be your call). M2 type SSD helps as well. 

 

I'd say at least 8 cores/16 threads (AMD Ryzen is real value for money). At least 32GB RAM. If you plan to stick with Windows, get more RAM (like 64GB) and use some of that as RAMDisk. That helps. 

 

CS! 

Ok, so Linux, AMD Ryzen, m.s SSD's and lots of ram.

 

Thanks dhaval, I'm sure that I will (I do already) have more question later.



#6 Monkeybird747

Monkeybird747

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 561
  • Joined: 31 Aug 2017
  • Loc: Louisville, KY

Posted 18 September 2019 - 12:08 AM

I have just completed a bench mark in PI here are the results...

 

attachicon.gif Benchmark - Baseline.png

 

And here are the reported benchmark results on the PI website for my processor and my PI build...

 

attachicon.gif PixInsight Benchmark Reports.png

 

It seems that my machine is the slowest of the bunch... that's me at number 11. I'm the last place winner. frown.gif

 

So that's where I am at now.

 

 

Miguel   8-)

 

.

Check the 1950x Threadripper benchmarks at the top of the page. My build is the first 3 listed. I have a few of the build details in the description. The first 3 or 4 machines at the very top of the list belong to the Pixinsight team, and have 32 core processors. The performance is not twice as good as the 16 core. The 3900x 12 core is a good performer for this application. Look at the times on the far right. Only three machine beat me out, and two of those were the 3900x.


  • PirateMike likes this

#7 PirateMike

PirateMike

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 2649
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2013
  • Loc: A Green Dot On A Blue Sea

Posted 18 September 2019 - 12:14 AM

Dhaval beat me to it. I just built a dedicated machine for PI processing. It cost about $1800 to build from scratch, but there is probably room to trim the fat if you have some components that you can reuse.

Strictly speaking about Pixinsight, two or three things will have significant impacts on your processing speed. It is optimized for Linux, loves AMD multicore/multi-thread processors, and needs a fast place for swap files. The 16 core threadrippers are very popular. The 12 core is also a great performer for pixinsight.

Hey Monkeybird747. with a name like that I have to presume that you're a pilot waytogo.gif. But you need to get faster on the keyboard. lol.gif

 

I built this computer myself too (I have built a few computers, back in the day my first was a 286 machine) when the 6700K processor was new to the market. Things have moved along since then, but I am far behind in keeping up with the computer world.

 

What ever is not replaced on this machine will go into another new case that I have hanging around and I'll use that machine strictly for controlling my AP setup. The new machine will be a PI only machine.

 

 

Miguel   8-)

 

.



#8 PirateMike

PirateMike

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 2649
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2013
  • Loc: A Green Dot On A Blue Sea

Posted 18 September 2019 - 12:26 AM

Check the 1950x Threadripper benchmarks at the top of the page. My build is the first 3 listed. I have a few of the build details in the description. The first 3 or 4 machines at the very top of the list belong to the Pixinsight team, and have 32 core processors. The performance is not twice as good as the 16 core. The 3900x 12 core is a good performer for this application. Look at the times on the far right. Only three machine beat me out, and two of those were the 3900x.

Wow, you move at the speed of light. I didn't know that I could click the reports and see what parts make up the machine, this will be a great help. i'm already learning "new for me" stuff. smile.gif

 

I do have lots of questions about swap files and how I can set them up and make them work. If you could enlighten me on the subject it would be a big help as I really know nothing about that.

 

I'll check out the AMD processor prices to start.



#9 bobzeq25

bobzeq25

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 16931
  • Joined: 27 Oct 2014

Posted 18 September 2019 - 12:29 AM

Joining the chorus.  <smile>

 

Cores and threads are first priority.

 

Something fast for swap files, a RAMDisk is popular, I used a Sony 970PRO SSD, ram was ridiculously expensive when I built mine.

 

I use 32gig of modest memory, still not sure how important RAM is, if you are not using a RAMDisk for swap.

 

Here's my story.  It cost a little less than $2000, runs the benchmark in about 23 seconds.  Does preprocessing super fast, 32 subs (threads) at a time.

 

https://www.cloudyni...25#entry9111942


Edited by bobzeq25, 18 September 2019 - 12:46 AM.

  • PirateMike and Gene3 like this

#10 Jim Waters

Jim Waters

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2982
  • Joined: 21 Oct 2007
  • Loc: Phoenix, AZ USA

Posted 18 September 2019 - 12:34 AM

  • Replace all HDD's with SSD's. 
  • If you have the capabilities create a RAID 0 drive using 2 independent SSD's and load your images there for processing.
  • Use the fastest memory possible for your CPU and memory bus.
  • The faster the CPU the better and use a motherboard that supports 4 memory buses / channels.  
  • The more physical and logical cores the better - AMD.
  • 16Gbytes of memory or more... (depending on size and quantity of subs being processed - 32GBytes).
  • Create a secondary Swap File location on the RAID 0 drive.

Edited by Jim Waters, 18 September 2019 - 12:42 AM.


#11 Adun

Adun

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2611
  • Joined: 02 Dec 2016

Posted 18 September 2019 - 12:38 AM

6700k is a 2015 processor/platform. Still good, but you'll eventually need to update, so ┬┐Why not now?

 

If you keep with the 6700k, the only thing I'd consider investing is a NVMe SSD for all the files PI will be processing (assuming the Intel motherboard can take NVMe drives).

 

If you choose to rebuild, Ryzen is the obvious choice. Higher throughput for stacking and pixel processing, needs more cores, and that means Ryzen. The midrange Ryzen 5 3600 ($200) would be the baseline, since it matches your 6700k on single threaded performance (see here), and beats it in multithreaded.

 

For a serious perf improvement on parallel workloads, the Ryzen 3900x has 3 times the cores of your 6700k. That would be quite a noticeable improvement.


Edited by Adun, 18 September 2019 - 09:30 AM.

  • jdupton and PirateMike like this

#12 Chris Ryan

Chris Ryan

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 146
  • Joined: 08 Mar 2014
  • Loc: Brisbane

Posted 18 September 2019 - 12:42 AM

Check the 1950x Threadripper benchmarks at the top of the page. My build is the first 3 listed. I have a few of the build details in the description. The first 3 or 4 machines at the very top of the list belong to the Pixinsight team, and have 32 core processors. The performance is not twice as good as the 16 core. The 3900x 12 core is a good performer for this application. Look at the times on the far right. Only three machine beat me out, and two of those were the 3900x.

If you scroll down to a few older versions, you'll find this one: http://pixinsight.co...7OZ31DD6F44US3L which I did last year and outperforms those at the top of the list you mentioned.  I did specifically tune the machine though for the benchmarks (overclocking tweaks, etc). :)

 

I am assuming the benchmark hasn't changed significantly since the version I used and that comparisons are still fairly valid.


  • PirateMike likes this

#13 james7ca

james7ca

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 7412
  • Joined: 21 May 2011
  • Loc: San Diego, CA

Posted 18 September 2019 - 12:42 AM

In terms of disk speed you definitely want to use an NVMe drive, not just any M.2 drive. NVMe drives can easily be two to four times as fast as the best SSDs that are based upon the SATA standard (and some M.2 drives are based upon the SATA interface).


  • Jim Waters, AstroGabe and PirateMike like this

#14 PirateMike

PirateMike

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 2649
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2013
  • Loc: A Green Dot On A Blue Sea

Posted 18 September 2019 - 12:53 AM

Here's my story.  It cost a little less than $2000, runs the benchmark in about 23 seconds.  Does preprocessing super fast, 32 subs (threads) at a time.

 

https://www.cloudyni...25#entry9111942

Hello Bob,

 

I'll read the thread later when I get deeper in the process, but I do have a quick question right now...

 

The $2000 price tag is a little to heavy for me, (I have everything I need, just have to order the ONTC next week) but does that include the case, monitor, video card, bla bla bla?... basically the whole system or just the SSDs, CPU, Memory?

 

 

Miguel   8-)

 

.



#15 PirateMike

PirateMike

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 2649
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2013
  • Loc: A Green Dot On A Blue Sea

Posted 18 September 2019 - 01:04 AM

 

  • Replace all HDD's with SSD's. 
  • If you have the capabilities create a RAID 0 drive using 2 independent SSD's and load your images there for processing.
  • Use the fastest memory possible for your CPU and memory bus.
  • The faster the CPU the better and use a motherboard that supports 4 memory buses / channels.  
  • The more physical and logical cores the better - AMD.
  • 16Gbytes of memory or more... (depending on size and quantity of subs being processed - 32GBytes).
  • Create a secondary Swap File location on the RAID 0 drive.

 

Hey Jim,

 

#1 - Check

#2 - I was thinking of using one of my many spinning HDD for storage and just load the subs onto the main SSD from there. Is that OK? A little manual labor hasn't killed me yet.

#3 - Check, if I can afford it.

#4 - Check.. and always 4 memory channels

#5 - Check

#6 - 32 gigs minimum, probably 64 gigs

#7 - seriously, I have no idea about swap files and how to set them up.

 

Thanks for the general info.  waytogo.gif

 

 

Miguel   8-)

 

.



#16 PirateMike

PirateMike

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 2649
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2013
  • Loc: A Green Dot On A Blue Sea

Posted 18 September 2019 - 01:07 AM

In terms of disk speed you definitely want to use an NVMe drive, not just any M.2 drive. NVMe drives can easily be two to four times as fast as the best SSDs that are based upon the SATA standard (and some M.2 drives are based upon the SATA interface).

Excellent advise and something I didn't know.

 

How many and what size drives do I need? Are as many as possible better than just one? Or will one be good enough?

 

 

Miguel   8-)

 

.



#17 Jon Rista

Jon Rista

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 23721
  • Joined: 10 Jan 2014
  • Loc: Colorado

Posted 18 September 2019 - 01:10 AM

I have just completed a bench mark in PI here are the results...

 

attachicon.gif Benchmark - Baseline.png

 

And here are the reported benchmark results on the PI website for my processor and my PI build...

 

attachicon.gif PixInsight Benchmark Reports.png

 

It seems that my machine is the slowest of the bunch... that's me at number 11. I'm the last place winner. frown.gif

 

So that's where I am at now.

 

 

Miguel   8-)

 

.

Something to keep in mind before you spend a lot of money. This is the total time it takes to perform a completely automated, start to finish post-process of an image. So, your computer took 90 seconds to perform all of that processing, one process after another, back to back. A minute and a half.

 

How long does it take you to process an image? A minute and a half? If you say yes to that, my head might literally explode! :p I'm going to assume it takes you...at least 30 minutes? Longer? An hour...two hours? With the kind of processing involved in the benchmark, I would say a lot of imagers, including myself, would probably take an hour to do it all.

 

SO...take that 90 seconds, and distribute all that processing time out over 30, 60, 90 MINUTES of total time. Do you think you are going to notice the difference in how long it takes to, say, do a sample pass of noise reduction on a small preview with TGV, between the system that gets the benchmark job done in 53 seconds vs. your system which gets it done in 90? How much difference in time to run, say, MMT do you think you would see with the faster build? Maybe a second? Two?

 

Do you think you would even notice a 5 second difference in how long it took TGV, or MMT, or HDRMT, or any one of those other longer running processes, when you were actually sitting there fiddling around with settings and figuring out how best to handle your data?

 

I use an "ancient" i7 4930k CPU, overclocked a bit, with 32gb of "ancient" DDR3 overclocked a bit, on an "old" SSD (not an M2) for the OS, with a similarly "old" SSD for data storage. Since PI got multi-threaded capabilities in its pre-processing tools, I have never felt that PI was slow. By far the slowest part of PI was the pre-processing, which when it was all single threaded took FOR-E-VER!!!! But now it blitzes right through all the pre-processing stuff, and lately I'm down to integrating 40, 50, 60 frames per channel, for a total of less than 200 most of the time, which has made it all go even faster. Once I am into the actual post-processing? The single largest bottleneck...is me. When running HEFTY processes like noise reduction, deconvolution, etc. I always do it on smaller previews to start. So the time to process is just seconds anyway. I then will fiddle around with the settings and re-apply to these previews over, and over, and over and over and over...until I have it all "just right". Then I'll apply it to the full image, which might take about a minute to process. I'll easily spend 10, 20, 30 times as much time fiddling around and getting things just right, than the amount of time PI actually takes to compute. Then I'm onto the next phase of processing, where I'll do the same thing...fiddle around until things are just right, using previews to speed things up, then apply to the full image just once.

 

I haven't upgraded my computer in some five years. PI does not feel slow at all. It isn't "instantaneous" for everything, but...look at the benchmarks. You've got about 40-50 seconds for high end modern windows rigs (expensive rigs!), vs. 90 seconds for your rig. I mean, at best, spending a lot of money on a new computer for PI might speed up the things PI itself does by a factor of...two? If you go the Linux route, and get one of the higher end Ryzens with lots of cores, you MIGHT get down into the 20 second range. That would be about 4x faster than your rig...but again...for the things PI itself does. That...minute or two of compute time. Out of the entire post-processing workflow that will usually take...30, 40, 60 minutes, if not longer.

 

Just to shed some light on what it is you would actually be spending your hard earned money on. ;)


  • NMCN, Traveler, AstroGabe and 3 others like this

#18 PirateMike

PirateMike

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 2649
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2013
  • Loc: A Green Dot On A Blue Sea

Posted 18 September 2019 - 01:14 AM

.  I did specifically tune the machine though for the benchmarks (overclocking tweaks, etc). smile.gif

Hey Chris,

 

Nice... but I don't think I am up to tweeking, but then again I'm also not looking to make the fastest PI machine in the world, just something somewhat close. I'll look into the CPU long with looking into many of the others too.

 

 

Miguel   8-)

 

.



#19 Jim Waters

Jim Waters

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2982
  • Joined: 21 Oct 2007
  • Loc: Phoenix, AZ USA

Posted 18 September 2019 - 01:16 AM

Hey Jim,

 

#1 - Check

#2 - I was thinking of using one of my many spinning HDD for storage and just load the subs onto the main SSD from there. Is that OK? A little manual labor hasn't killed me yet.

#3 - Check, if I can afford it.

#4 - Check.. and always 4 memory channels

#5 - Check

#6 - 32 gigs minimum, probably 64 gigs

#7 - seriously, I have no idea about swap files and how to set them up.

 

Thanks for the general info.  waytogo.gif

 

 

Miguel   8-)

 

.

Item 2 - Sure HDD for image storage.  Less expensive and more reliable.  When a SSD fails its toast...  When a HDD fails you can usually recover the files.

Item 7 - Go into PI's Global Preferences - EDIT => Global Preferences => Directories and Network.  Make sure the listed Swap File points to a SSD Disk.  Standalone or RAID 0.

 

One more thing under Global Preferences.  Under Parallel Processing and Threads make sure you use all the CPU cores.  This may make your PC somewhat unresponsive during processing to other stuff.


  • PirateMike likes this

#20 PirateMike

PirateMike

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 2649
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2013
  • Loc: A Green Dot On A Blue Sea

Posted 18 September 2019 - 01:27 AM

All good stuff here, you folks are the bomb. bow.gif

 

I think now I need to research the parts required (MB, SSd's, Ram, CPU) and see what I can afford. I pretty much have everything else that I need (Case, Monitor, HiD, bla bla bla..).

 

What I really need to do is learn about a few "new to me" things, like Ramdisk, Swap Files and other technical things.

 

So let's see how it goes and I'll make the orders when ready, I guess in a few days or so.

 

Thanks again for all the general info, and if you want add anything else please do not hesitate, you folks know better than me. waytogo.gif

 

 

Miguel   8-)

 

.



#21 Jim Waters

Jim Waters

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2982
  • Joined: 21 Oct 2007
  • Loc: Phoenix, AZ USA

Posted 18 September 2019 - 01:43 AM

Forget about RamDisk's.  A RamDisk is software that's used to allocate a section of memory and make it into a logical disk.  Its old technology and not needed.  Use the SSD's (Standalone or RAID 0)...


Edited by Jim Waters, 18 September 2019 - 01:44 AM.

  • PirateMike likes this

#22 PirateMike

PirateMike

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 2649
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2013
  • Loc: A Green Dot On A Blue Sea

Posted 18 September 2019 - 01:51 AM

Item 2 - Sure HDD for image storage.  Less expensive and more reliable.  When a SSD fails its toast...  When a HDD fails you can usually recover the files.

Item 7 - Go into PI's Global Preferences - EDIT => Global Preferences => Directories and Network.  Make sure the listed Swap File points to a SSD Disk.  Standalone or RAID 0.

 

One more thing under Global Preferences.  Under Parallel Processing and Threads make sure you use all the CPU cores.  This may make your PC somewhat unresponsive during processing to other stuff.

Jim,

 

I do have HDD's laying all over the place, my middle name is Backup! lol.gif 

 

What I do now for my AP is that I copy my subs from the acquisition computer (first set of files) in my garage to the connected external HDD (second set of files), this HDD is in a case that remain unpowered until I need to add more files, so it doesn't really see much usage.

 

Then I copy the same files to a portable 4gig HDD (third set of files) so I can move them to my processing computer in the house (forth set of files) and thne perform another backup to another external HDD at that computer (fifth set of files), then I'm done.

 

That may sound like a lot of work but I do it while cutting the grass, making lunch, bla bla bla. The main point is to be aware and complete the process. To get the job done only take a few clicks here and there and wait a few minutes in between. It has been many years since I have lost a file, and the last time I did I learned a very expensive (data wise) lesson.

 

 

Miguel   8-)

 

.


  • happylimpet likes this

#23 PirateMike

PirateMike

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 2649
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2013
  • Loc: A Green Dot On A Blue Sea

Posted 18 September 2019 - 01:55 AM

Forget about RamDisk's.  A RamDisk is software that's used to allocate a section of memory and make it into a logical disk.  Its old technology and not needed.  Use the SSD's (Standalone or RAID 0)...

Great, that's one less thing to think about. I do remember RamDisks from years ago. I think Windows created and then used them when upgrading from one version to a newer version. But that memory is quite foggy now, so I may be mistaken.

 

 

Miguel   8-)

 

.


Edited by PirateMike, 18 September 2019 - 01:56 AM.


#24 Chris Ryan

Chris Ryan

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 146
  • Joined: 08 Mar 2014
  • Loc: Brisbane

Posted 18 September 2019 - 02:17 AM

Ramdisks will be faster than an SSD, but they are not worth the effort to use (except for benchmarking whistling.gif grin.gif) for day to day use.  You lose that memory for other tasks, and you have to set them up each time you boot up.  Also, you lose the contents when powering off.  For PI, those swap disks are what it uses for caching.  So if you do repeat processing (say after tweaking a variable), PI might be able to draw on what's in the swap.  The Ramdisk would be ok within a session, but if you come back the next day, etc, you won't get the benefit.

 

 



#25 jerahian

jerahian

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 619
  • Joined: 02 Aug 2018
  • Loc: Maine

Posted 18 September 2019 - 02:21 AM

Since you have a lot of RAM, you can definitely try a RAM disk and see it's impact right now (as an exercise).  Although, I have to say, I kinda agree with Jon Rista's comments above.

 

Anyhoo, you can use ImDisk to easily create a RAM disk.  Just follow these instructions:  

https://www.maketech...m-disk-windows/

 

Just as a test, I just took my Acer Aspire 7 laptop, which has an Intel® Core™ i7-8750H CPU @ 2.20GHz with 16 GB of RAM and created a 4 GB RAM disk on it.  This took about 5 minutes to do, again, just as a test.

 

My benchmark before and after were:

Before:  http://pixinsight.co...CWF3WH27M4O4Y95

After:  http://pixinsight.co...25QWS9D42LM991U

 

-Ara

 

EDIT:  I forgot to mention you need to add the RAM disk as a swap storage directory in PixInsight, under Edit > Global Preferences > Directories and Network.  I just added my new RAM disk path (R:/) to the existing temp path and moved it to the top.


Edited by jerahian, 18 September 2019 - 02:28 AM.

  • PirateMike likes this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics