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My very first image of nebula! Soul Nebula IC1848

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#1 AstroPepe

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 04:12 PM

Hi :) I decided to show you my very first image of nebula that i took a few weeks ago. Please tell me if i can do something better in processing :) I know there is chromatic aberration but i do not have field flattener yet :D Please share your comments and thoughts! :)

 

Total exposure 1 hour 8 minutes, ISO 1600

I used flats and darks

Camera: Canon 1100d modified

Scope: Skywatcher 72 ed

Filters used: skytech cls-ccd

Mount: Skywatcher eq 3-2 pro

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#2 Tom K

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 07:41 PM

Great first effort!   You appear to be on the right track.   As with most things, more time will help improve the detail.



#3 JDShoots

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 09:12 PM

Hi smile.gif I decided to show you my very first image of nebula that i took a few weeks ago. Please tell me if i can do something better in processing smile.gif I know there is chromatic aberration but i do not have field flattener yet laugh.gif Please share your comments and thoughts! smile.gif

Beautiful!  

A question, how did you know you were on target, I ask having never shot one myself?  Can you make anything out in an individual sub on camera?

JD



#4 Tom K

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 09:38 PM

Beautiful!  

A question, how did you know you were on target, I ask having never shot one myself?  Can you make anything out in an individual sub on camera?

JD

That is one of the tougher things to do when starting out and if you don't have advanced systems that allow platesolving.   What I used to do is to find my way to a bright star so I could get focused first.   If your mount allows it to sync to a few stars to get itself aligned, this would be the time to start that.   Of course you could also do that visually as well.

 

Once you have the scope aligned, you slew to where the object is and take a sub.   For a beginner, you should start with bright nebulas/galaxies, and if you have decent focus and at least 30 seconds on a sub, you should be able to see something.   With luck, you will have at least part of the object in the frame and then it is an iterative process to get it centered.

 

This can take some work depending on the accuracy of your mount.   I did it for years and I can attest that a modern mount that can platesolve is a big game changer!

 

If you are taking your first shot at this time of year I would go for M31as it is huge and hard to miss.

 

Good luck!


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#5 AstroPepe

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 01:16 AM

Beautiful!
A question, how did you know you were on target, I ask having never shot one myself? Can you make anything out in an individual sub on camera?
JD

Thanks :) tom is right. I also compare my sub to someones else photo. And if the stars are the same as in my image i know im on target. I also use astrophotography tool which is camera control software. I use auto stretch for one photo and it shows me if there is any nebualocity. Of course im not sure if it works with darker nebulas :)
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#6 mic1970

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 08:36 AM

I liked it a lot.  



#7 AstroPepe

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 11:42 AM

I liked it a lot.

Thanks :D

#8 JDShoots

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 01:13 PM

Thanks smile.gif tom is right. I also compare my sub to someones else photo. And if the stars are the same as in my image i know im on target. I also use astrophotography tool which is camera control software. I use auto stretch for one photo and it shows me if there is any nebualocity. Of course im not sure if it works with darker nebulas smile.gif

Well Pepe, keep it up.  I may just have to point to this region to see what I get.   I am always drawn to the dark "starless" area in the nebula, so interesting.   

 

Pepe and Tom, thanks for the info.   I use that approach shooting galaxies, I setup the setting circles on my mount, and it's worked well.  My thought is, once I try a nebula, I may not see it in the camera.   I suppose I may need to link to a laptop for some stretching to verify.   I'll start with M42:)  I was able to see M101 @ mag 7.86 so hopefully this will also be visible in my camera at mag 6.5.  



#9 Tom K

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 02:57 PM

JDShoots - a laptop is nearly essential to saving a bunch of time taking what you think might be great but turn out to be the wrong thing.   There is a lot of cheap software out there that does a decent job when you are starting out.  Pepe mentioned APT and I think that costs like $20.



#10 JDShoots

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 11:58 PM

JDShoots - a laptop is nearly essential to saving a bunch of time taking what you think might be great but turn out to be the wrong thing.   There is a lot of cheap software out there that does a decent job when you are starting out.  Pepe mentioned APT and I think that costs like $20.

Thanks Tom.  

I will pick that up, looks like it has a boatload of tools.  It is a pain looking at the back of the camera, especially without an articulating LCD.  

JD



#11 Tom K

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 12:13 AM

I use a 10 year old Canon T1i - no articulating screen at all.   It is infeasible for me to articulate my body to use the screen - perhaps 30 years ago on a good night.  I have used APT but migrated up to SGP when I wanted a bit more control.   With that said - you can absolutely get good data with APT - the same you would get with SGP.  When you get even a DSLR (even an old one in my case) pointed in the right direction and accurately guided for long enough you can get great results.   That sounds easier than it is, but it is possible!

 

Here is data gathered this week....full astrobin details here:

 

https://www.astrobin.com/qlj8b0/0/

 

 

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#12 AstroPepe

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 11:56 AM

Great first effort!   You appear to be on the right track.   As with most things, more time will help improve the detail.

Thanks Tom, sorry i was in school so i didn't notice your reply. Very nice picture above. I just got very good moon image in my opinion. It is my first successfull image of moon. I will post it soon, make sure to check it out smile.gif


Edited by AstroPepe, 20 September 2019 - 12:04 PM.


#13 AstroPepe

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 12:03 PM

Well Pepe, keep it up.  I may just have to point to this region to see what I get.   I am always drawn to the dark "starless" area in the nebula, so interesting.   

 

Pepe and Tom, thanks for the info.   I use that approach shooting galaxies, I setup the setting circles on my mount, and it's worked well.  My thought is, once I try a nebula, I may not see it in the camera.   I suppose I may need to link to a laptop for some stretching to verify.   I'll start with M42:)  I was able to see M101 @ mag 7.86 so hopefully this will also be visible in my camera at mag 6.5.  

Thanks JDshoots laugh.gif Deepsky objects are very interesting. APT has also 30 days free trial smile.gif Ill often take about 5 second sub and look for the stars. Then i compare it with another image in google. If i see the same stars im ready to go laugh.gif Thats one way to make sure but APTs autostretch is good.


Edited by AstroPepe, 20 September 2019 - 12:04 PM.


#14 hobbyknipser

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 03:22 PM

Hi, Pepe,

 

A fine result! waytogo.gif

I have the same camera and an 80mm APO, f/6, but I'm using it with a 0,8x reducer.

For better image quality it is important to take long single exposures. You will see much more of the Emission Nebula (more signal) and can stretch more (if you take more exposures; total exposure time!),. If you don't want a guider: I do it myself with a guide tube and a double-cross ocular. Fitswork is a good program for the first stretch. A narrower filter, UHC, would show the nebula better.

 

greetings

Andreas



#15 AstroPepe

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 04:01 AM

Hi, Pepe,

A fine result! waytogo.gif
I have the same camera and an 80mm APO, f/6, but I'm using it with a 0,8x reducer.
For better image quality it is important to take long single exposures. You will see much more of the Emission Nebula (more signal) and can stretch more (if you take more exposures; total exposure time!),. If you don't want a guider: I do it myself with a guide tube and a double-cross ocular. Fitswork is a good program for the first stretch. A narrower filter, UHC, would show the nebula better.

greetings
Andreas

Thanks a lot Andreas!! :D im going to buy the flattener when i have a little bit more money :) the problem is shooting more than 2 minutes subs my stars on the edges becomes more and more unnatural (comet looking star) thats why i need to buy flattener so i can do longer exposure :D and ofcourse guiding camera is on the list altair hypercam :)

#16 JDShoots

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 11:23 AM

Thanks JDshoots laugh.gif Deepsky objects are very interesting. APT has also 30 days free trial smile.gif Ill often take about 5 second sub and look for the stars. Then i compare it with another image in google. If i see the same stars im ready to go laugh.gif Thats one way to make sure but APTs autostretch is good.

Good info.   I will have to try it out.   Man, I will soon need a portable shed and a generator to house all the equipment I bring to the field:)  




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