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How many frame per Minute?

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#1 patindaytona

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 04:10 PM

What frame rate is best to use for video stacking? The normal is 1/60th



#2 bobzeq25

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 04:40 PM

The simple answer is that the faster your frame rate, the more frames, the better.  Capturing more data is always better, no matter what you're imaging.

 

Planetary cameras are designed for speed, and have a Region of Interest feature, so you're not downloading so much empty space.

 

Look at this page, click the specifications tab, scroll down to the supported resolutions table, look at the frame rates.  They max out at over 250 frames per second.

 

https://astronomy-im...roduct/asi224mc

 

You'll get better answers on he Solar System Imaging forum.  BII is almost entirely DSOs, and DSO imagers don't use video.  It's a planetary/lunar thing, because they are so bright.  DSOs are _much _ dimmer, require _much_ longer exposures.  These are two different activities.


Edited by bobzeq25, 19 September 2019 - 05:22 PM.

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#3 barbarosa

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 05:20 PM

What frame rate is best to use for video stacking? The normal is 1/60th

The highest frame rate (and the smallest practical region of interest H pixels x W pixels that you can manage. Higher frame rates may require more gain and create more noise, but let stacking take  care of the noise.


Edited by barbarosa, 19 September 2019 - 05:21 PM.


#4 Stelios

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 05:22 PM

Moving to SSI&P for a better fit.



#5 Sunspot

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 05:43 PM

I try to shoot for 100 frames per second except for Saturn where it's typically 35-50fps.


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#6 DMach

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 11:23 PM

Whilst I know this is probably not what you want to hear, the answer is "you need to experiement and find the best settings for your equipment, local conditions ... and preferences".

 

(When I was starting out I remember wishing someone would just give me "the best settings". But I learned for myself that what everyone was telling me is true: you want to experiement for yourself.)

 

Here's an excellent resource to start with:

 

http://planetaryimag...etting-started/


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#7 BQ Octantis

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 07:53 AM

I use 8.6 fps.

 

BQ



#8 aeroman4907

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 08:12 AM

I use 8.6 fps.

 

BQ

8.6 fps???  I get 13.6 fps with my QHY 183C sensor (20MP) with an 8 bit SER capture, and that feels agonizingly slow.  Granted the OP's question is vague to usage and object being captured, but why do you recommend 8.6 fps?  You have nice images of the planets, so I don't think you are doing a 3 minute run on Jupiter and only getting 1548 frames.  Did you mean 86 fps?


Edited by aeroman4907, 20 September 2019 - 08:13 AM.


#9 BQ Octantis

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 08:56 AM

8.6 fps???  I get 13.6 fps with my QHY 183C sensor (20MP) with an 8 bit SER capture, and that feels agonizingly slow.  Granted the OP's question is vague to usage and object being captured, but why do you recommend 8.6 fps?  You have nice images of the planets, so I don't think you are doing a 3 minute run on Jupiter and only getting 1548 frames.  Did you mean 86 fps?

Nope. I typed it correctly. 8.6 fps. AstroDSLR only captures Canon EOS Live View output at this rate; BackyardEOS captures it at 20fps. Canons have a fixed video shutter speed of 1/30sec.

 

I shoot 200 seconds for 1720 frames; I only stack 1024-3072 frames for an image. See this post:

 

https://www.cloudyni...iter-and-a-t3i/

 

And this one:

 

https://www.cloudyni...sct-test-three/

 

The "optimal" frame rate depends on camera, aperture, seeing, and ground winds. But 8.6 fps is what I get regardless.

 

BQ



#10 aeroman4907

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 09:04 AM

Nope. I typed it correctly. 8.6 fps. AstroDSLR only captures Canon EOS Live View output at this rate; BackyardEOS captures it at 20fps. Canons have a fixed video shutter speed of 1/30sec.

 

I shoot 200 seconds for 1720 frames; I only stack 1024-3072 frames for an image. See this post:

 

https://www.cloudyni...iter-and-a-t3i/

 

And this one:

 

https://www.cloudyni...sct-test-three/

 

The "optimal" frame rate depends on camera, aperture, seeing, and ground winds. But 8.6 fps is what I get regardless.

 

BQ

Thanks for clarifying.



#11 RedLionNJ

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 09:28 AM

What frame rate is best to use for video stacking? The normal is 1/60th

Where does this nominal "normal" come from?

 

I've seen everything from 1 fps on Neptune to 750 fps on Venus.

 

It depends on target, equipment and conditions. There IS no "normal".



#12 BQ Octantis

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 04:35 PM

Thanks for clarifying.

No worries, mate!

 

Come to think of it, the other gigantic factor is the target's inherent brightness. I can get good results on Venus with less than 100 frames, whereas I had to reduce the magnification on Saturn so its brightness was the same as Jupiter's. Can't remember what I did for Mars…




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