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Cannot beat 100mm+ Binoculars

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#1 robodan

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 07:45 PM

I had read any binoculars 100mm plus give that wow factor that smaller binoculars cannot give.

Even going from 80mm to 100mm binoculars is a big difference.

Found even 80mm dont give the WOW factor so got me a pair of 25x100 binoculars.

Sure are heavier but if you can afford to mount them and buy them them than a smaller pair of binoculars just dont cut the views you get with hugh binoculars.
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#2 TOMDEY

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 09:25 PM

Yeah... I have APM 100mm ED APO and love them... Problem then is that they also make 120mm and 150mm versions... On the positive side, aperture can't be any bigger than the diameter of the universe (at which limit it technically becomes a microscope)... so there is an upper limit on how big they will eventually make and market these things.    Tom


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#3 oldmanrick

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 01:03 PM

The 100 is relatively easy to move around, and the views are certainly good for a few WOW's, but no match for the 150.

 

The 150 is about as big as I'm willing to deal with.  Mobility gets too limited and the strain to mount and handle is about at my limit.  

 

Boy-oh-boy are the views worth it all though! 

 

Rick



#4 robodan

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 01:35 PM

Yes as in binoculars even a small increase over 100mm makes hugh differince,- but as I said anything 100+ makes a hugh differince and anything under that does not really cut it.

The differince between an 80mm and 100mm binoculars is a big differince and more so than going from an 80mm scope to a 100mm scope

Yes the views in a 150mm binocular will be miles better again.

But have had 80mm binoculars in the past and not a patch on 100mm plus.

Think 100mm maybe the smallest binocular to give that WOW factor and the most satisfying, whereas anything smaller just gives a general view and no where as detailed or satisfied viewing.

So to me would not consider anything smaller than 100mm after having them and give the most pleasant views and the best sweet spot.

Over 100mm start becoming bulky and much harder to handle.

The differince when you go from small binoculars and getting 100mm plus is like night and day. And if you can afford them and mount them are what you should be going for

#5 Tamiji Homma

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 06:29 PM

I think WOW factor really depends on combinations of various factors (sky condition, target (area of sky), who with you,  ... a lot of human,

environment factors :)

 

I can't say particular aperture gives more WOW than the others.

 

I've looked through aperture 7mm (naked eyes) to 36" scope (cyclops).

 

I observe regularly with various binoculars between 7mm and 150mm. (7, 22, 30, 32, 36, 42, 50, 60, 65, 70, 80, 95, 100, 125, 140, 150).

The more aperture, the fewer occasions.  The darker sky, I prefer to smaller aperture instrument (for wider TFOV).

 

Each aperture at right sky condition, target gave me unforgettable WOW moments.

 

Tammy



#6 Nightfly

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 06:37 PM

Agreed.  Large binoculars carry a lot of Wow factor, especially under Wow skies.  However, I'd take my 100mm BT under pristine skies over the 150's under a average sky any day for deep sky work.

 

For deep sky work, all good quality binoculars perform great under very dark skies. 

 

Binocular selection then becomes an effort of desired field size and exit pupil.  


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#7 Sketcher

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 07:38 PM

. . . different binoculars for different purposes and/or different objects..

 

100mm binoculars can't do all that an 80 can, and an 80mm binocular can't do all that a 100 can.  I'm quite happy with my three pair of binoculars -- an 8x42, a 20x80, and a 25x100.  Each has capabilities that the others lack.

 

My first choice for capturing all the Messier objects -- 20x80s.  Best for sweeping the Milky Way -- I would choose the 8x42s.  For going deeper and/or observing in greater detail -- it's the 25x100s.

 

I have mounts that can be used with each; but mostly I stick with hand-held use -- for each.smile.gif


Edited by Sketcher, 20 September 2019 - 07:39 PM.

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#8 dd61999

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 08:44 PM

How are planets in 25x100



#9 TOMDEY

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 08:46 PM

I guess I'm supposed to show these... my biggest astro-binos (so far)... with Night Vision eyepieces... I avoid aiming at galaxies closer than a billion light years, because they ruin my dark adaptation... Click on for most impressive rendition.   Tom

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#10 robodan

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 10:07 PM

Beat the views are like out of this world

#11 robodan

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 10:09 PM

Only seen Juipter at the moment. Can see the disk and moons. But bit any detail on Jupiter or any bands

#12 Traveler

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 11:28 PM

Let me in peace please grin.gif ! I am just in my wow factor phase with my new 18x70....grin.gif 


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#13 J1M

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 04:12 PM

In other news ... I get plenty of WOW from my Oberwerk BT-82XL APO wink.gif

Edited by J1M, 21 September 2019 - 04:12 PM.

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#14 Jawaid I. Abbasi

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 05:00 PM

I guess I'm supposed to show these... my biggest astro-binos (so far)... with Night Vision eyepieces... I avoid aiming at galaxies closer than a billion light years, because they ruin my dark adaptation... Click on for most impressive rendition.   Tom

Tom.

I would love to check your 16" binocular that you showed in picture. I am sure, It will be really good views with dark skies you have. 



#15 Cali

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 05:21 PM

How are planets in 25x100

Planets are So-So. Luna and DSOs are where I find the 25x100 excels. It also really helps to have a parallelogram, especially if you want to spend any significant time hanging out at Zenith, where a lot of the good stuff is. I also have a pair of 20x80s and enjoy them just as much. I can actually do a decent job hand holding them if I'm leaning back on a reclining deck chair.

 

- Cal


Edited by Cali, 30 September 2019 - 07:08 PM.


#16 Cali

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 07:09 PM

I guess I'm supposed to show these... my biggest astro-binos (so far)... with Night Vision eyepieces... I avoid aiming at galaxies closer than a billion light years, because they ruin my dark adaptation... Click on for most impressive rendition.   Tom

No way, man. Really?

 

- Cal



#17 robodan

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 07:26 PM

Planets are So-So. Luna and DSOs are where I find the 25x100 excels. It also really helps to have a parallelogram, especially if you want to spend any significant time hanging out at Zenith, where a lot of the good stuff is. I also have a pair of 20x80s and enjoy them just as much. I can actually do a decent job hand holding them if I'm leaning back on a reclining deck chair.

 

- Cal

I find I can get pretty near enough to zenith without a parallelogram mount. My binoculars came as a package 25×100 to a decent tripod and goes about 6 feet high and good enough.

 

The problem with a parallelogram is they are heavy and bulky which I dont like and stick put a long way so take up a lot of room.

 

My tripod is lighter and much quicker and easier to transport as it comes in a bag with shoulder strap also.

 

If I wanted something a lot more comfortable than any mount it would be a mirror mount.


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#18 Cali

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 08:14 PM

I find I can get pretty near enough to zenith without a parallelogram mount. My binoculars came as a package 25×100 to a decent tripod and goes about 6 feet high and good enough.

 

The problem with a parallelogram is they are heavy and bulky which I dont like and stick put a long way so take up a lot of room.

 

My tripod is lighter and much quicker and easier to transport as it comes in a bag with shoulder strap also.

 

If I wanted something a lot more comfortable than any mount it would be a mirror mount.

I'll post a pic of the parallelogram I use and reasons why, but DO tell about the mirror mount.

 

- Cal



#19 TOMDEY

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 08:48 PM

No way, man. Really?

- Cal

Well... sometimes I exaggerate a wee bit. On the other hand, I once aimed it at Venus and the spiders began smoking... on both sides!    Tom


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#20 Cali

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 09:59 PM

Well... sometimes I exaggerate a wee bit. On the other hand, I once aimed it at Venus and the spiders began smoking... on both sides!    Tom

Anyone know any detail on that scope? How did they pull it off and does it really Really work?

 

- Cal



#21 TOMDEY

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 10:23 PM

Anyone know any detail on that scope? How did they pull it off and does it really Really work?

- Cal

Hi, Cal! --- if we're still talking the JMI RB-16s, here's an image showing the Night Vision Eyepieces and some of the other controls. Yes, it really works and is magnificent on lots of my favorite objects... like remote globular clusters and galaxies, of course. Also, the Horsehead really looks like the horsehead, staring straight at it, rather than subtle, it's obvious (using the Night Vision with very narrow-band Hydrogen Alpha filters)... both sides.

 

Tom, at JMI customized them for me, with Fullum mirrors that I provided and also other premium optics and enhanced coatings throughout. Their stock optics are more commercial-grade production line stuff.

 

~Click~ on the picture for a closer view of the controls. >>>    Tom

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#22 jdown

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Posted 01 October 2019 - 11:13 AM

I had to stop at 120mm.  Would love to have the extra light-gathering power of the 150mm, but it's just too heavy to lift.


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#23 Tyson M

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Posted 01 October 2019 - 12:04 PM

I guess I'm supposed to show these... my biggest astro-binos (so far)... with Night Vision eyepieces... I avoid aiming at galaxies closer than a billion light years, because they ruin my dark adaptation... Click on for most impressive rendition.   Tom

bow.gif  very nice!!!  I love this beast.



#24 Allan Wade

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Posted 01 October 2019 - 05:44 PM

I had my APM 120’s and 82’s set up last night to compare. This time of the year at my astro property is dark as the Milky Way lays flat on the horizon. I was getting 22.0 on my wide SQM. 

 

The APM 120 have turned into one of my favourite pieces of astro kit. As good as the 82’s are, I was forever keen to get back to the bigger bino to see how the object looked there, and there was always a world of difference. Clusters all look much better with more resolved stars and there was so much more detail in all the nebula. 

 

I like my APM 82’s as they are great performers. I guess their main advantage I see is the extra fov. But the fov in the 120’s is still quite generous. I find mounting the bigger bino not that much more onerous than mounting the small one.

 

I’ve used all the APM binoscope sizes except the 150’s, and for me the 120 is the sweet spot for performance in a size that mounts and travels easily. If I go bigger one day they will be dedicated OTA’s in an observatory. 


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#25 edwincjones

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Posted 04 October 2019 - 06:17 AM

I had read any binoculars 100mm plus give that wow factor that smaller binoculars cannot give............

My experience has been with fujinon 10x70s, miyauchi 100mm FL, and fuji MT 25x150s.

All have WOW factors-just different

 

70mms - smaller, relatively cheap, very portable and easy to use at a moments notice

100mms - more detail, sharper, but less convenient to use

150s -  very impressive  but required a permanent mount as travel too much  pain and worry

 

For me, the 100mms hit the sweet spot and have been kept.

I regret selling the 70s,

the 150s served their purpose and needed to go to someone to use more.

 

Just depends on one's observing desires and goals.  

If I could repeat my  25 years of astronomy

I would spend less on equipment 

and more  on observing and travel.

 

edj


Edited by edwincjones, 04 October 2019 - 06:23 AM.

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