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Apertura 6inch F4 Imaging Newt

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#26 GOLGO13

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 05:33 PM

That is helpful. I used to use the other way around with my old Celestron 5i. I said don't suggest objects below a certain degree. Because i had trees blocking my view.

#27 GOLGO13

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Posted 07 October 2019 - 09:24 AM

So I did a few things to the 6 inch F4, and I think it is something that may help anyone that decides to do so. In that, it was a bit more challenging than expected.

 

I decided to flock the tube and install a Catseye hot-spot for collimation.

 

So the real issue with the design is, the way the mirror cell assembly is attached to the scope is different than my 10 inch. On the 10 inch, you just unscrew the entire assembly by the screws on the side of the scope. However, with the 6 inch F4, there are nuts holding on the screws (whereas with the 10 inch, those screws just tighten themselves). 

 

Then I'm trying to figure out how I get those nuts back on. But it turns out the easiest way is to just take off the mirror by unscrewing the collimation screws. Carefully . And take off the springs and set them aside. Then slide the mirror out. Maybe this is something most people would know, but on this scope it was different for me. So lots of frustration trying to get this all working.

 

Anyways, I flocked the entire tube. I applied the Catseye hot spot over the existing spot. I believe the existing spot is etched into the mirror, so no use trying to get something like that off. This process went pretty smooth actually, but it took a few tries.

 

I put it all back together, but I have not finished making sure all is correct and collimating it. All of that took me a bit longer than expected. I think it took me about 2 hrs with help from my wife. I don't do a very pretty job with flocking, but I get the job done. 

 

So my lesson learned is, don't take off the entire mirror assembly when taking the mirror out. Just unscrew the collimation screws being careful not to lose washers and springs. Then the mirror just comes out. And if you want to do further efforts, you can take off the assembly after that because you will have access to the screws and nuts at the back of the scope. 

 

This is where I wish a user manual came with the scope...it would have been nice to have that info. Or I should have googled CN for this information.


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#28 GOLGO13

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Posted 07 October 2019 - 09:32 AM

Why flock people may ask...Because where I am using this scope there are a ton of stray lights (in my front yard). In my neighborhood, people are supposed to have their front lights on. Mine doesn't work so I don't. It is pretty bad really and annoying. But anyways, it really helps to flock for theses situations.

 

I remember flocking my 10 inch and I did before and after observations. It made a large difference on planetary and lunar observing. And just by taking pictures before and after, you can see why that would make a difference.

 

It's not a super fun effort, but it's not too bad. On the 6 inch F4, it's pretty easy to just do the whole tube. On the 10 inch I only did the top and bottom. I now have extra material so maybe I will finish the entire 10 inch now. Really, I think the bottom and top is all that is needed. But what the heck.



#29 StarCurious

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Posted 09 October 2019 - 06:39 PM


So the real issue with the design is, the way the mirror cell assembly is attached to the scope is different than my 10 inch. On the 10 inch, you just unscrew the entire assembly by the screws on the side of the scope. However, with the 6 inch F4, there are nuts holding on the screws (whereas with the 10 inch, those screws just tighten themselves). 

 

Then I'm trying to figure out how I get those nuts back on. But it turns out the easiest way is to just take off the mirror by unscrewing the collimation screws. Carefully . And take off the springs and set them aside. Then slide the mirror out. Maybe this is something most people would know, but on this scope it was different for me. So lots of frustration trying to get this all working.

 


So my lesson learned is, don't take off the entire mirror assembly when taking the mirror out. Just unscrew the collimation screws being careful not to lose washers and springs. Then the mirror just comes out. And if you want to do further efforts, you can take off the assembly after that because you will have access to the screws and nuts at the back of the scope. 

 

This is where I wish a user manual came with the scope...it would have been nice to have that info. Or I should have googled CN for this information.

I agree it would be nice if manuals are included with these telescopes.  I notice that your 10 inch is an Orion I0i, whereas the 6 inch is a GSO.  That may explain the differences in the mirror cell construction or assembly.

 

In my case, I have a GSO 10 inch dobsonian (Zhumell) and a GSO 6 inch imaging Newtonian (TPO).  I would like to push the mirror up a bit for the 10 inch Dob, but pretty scared that I might not be able to put it back together, especially since the 10 inch is quite heavy.  I would avoid taking the mirror cell out if it doesn't need to come out.

 

On the Zhumell Z10, there are 3 collimation bolts and 3 lock bolts.  If I loosen the lock bolts only without removing these lock bolts, only loosen but not remove all 3 collimation bolts, then remove only one collimation bolt and spring, then replace with new spring and longer collimation bolts, and only tighten this new collimation bolt slightly, whether I would cause some damage.  If this works, I should be able to replace all 3 collimation bolts with longer ones, then replace the lock bolts one at a time.

 

Sorry for moving a little off topic.  I am hoping you have a quick answer, as you have disassembled, not one, but two Newtonians!  Thanks.



#30 GOLGO13

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Posted 09 October 2019 - 07:53 PM

Your TPO newt should be the same as mine. I think the astrotech, apertura and TPO are the same. So very easy to adjust it...just only take off the collimation screws (make sure scope is horizontal!). Then the mirror comes out...if you ever had to do that. There is a washer and a spring also.

 

For the 10 inch it's probably similar I would guess, but not sure. Always be very careful of course. 10 inch mirrors are much heavier. Take the tube off the mount and have someone help. Have some pillows under it.

 

I think for pushing the mirror up, all you have to do is tighten the collimation bolts all the way, then loosen them to achieve collimation. Mine must already be to that point because I can achieve focus with it. But in the past I probably would not have.



#31 GOLGO13

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 05:48 PM

Update on my setup with the 6 inch F4. So I was having trouble with the bottom of the scope hitting the tripod. And right now lots of good stuff is at zenith. 

 

However, the extension that Vixen sells is pretty expensive and not exactly sure how to make it adapt. So I decided it was time to go to Lowes. 

 

See below how I extended it. I now can get to zenith completely all around the scope. I used that PVC piece (which has a little nub, but I'm not worried about that). I used 3 5 inch bolts I show below. 

 

The setup is very solid, so I don't suspect any issues. EDIT: The PVC was a 2 inch with a 3/4 inch inlet and 4 inches in length. Couldn't find one that was precut without the inlet.

 

bolt
PVC porta
porta extended

Edited by GOLGO13, 12 October 2019 - 05:49 PM.

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