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My first image outside our system....The Ring Nebula.

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#1 Ryan1776

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 08:00 AM

So. It took me an hour to find it last night. LXD55 so it's awful.
I just used the goto function, and started uploading the images to find where I'm at. 

 

So I would take a photo. Upload it to the plate solving site. Wait 3-4 min for it to tell me where I'm pointing. Move the scope. Repeat.

 

At like the 50th min mark I was about to pack it up. I kept moving a little around it.
Then one frame. It was there, about 2" on the screen!

Bumped the mount with my controller.
GONE.
Bumped it back twice.
DEAD CENTER!!!!
I just stared at it.
Incredible.
Started some practice test shots.
Kinda swagging what looked good. Amazed I was in focus. Thank you God!

Got 15 images....and the camera battery died. HAHAHA!!! 
Totally forgot to charge it.

 

Since the batt died, I took some dark frames this morning. I know not perfect. 

Stacked them. 

Rolled it into Photoshop. 

And here's what I got. 

 

It's nothing like some of you pros on here, but I'm very proud of it!!! 

smile.gif

The Ring Nebula.jpg


Edited by Ryan1776, 20 September 2019 - 08:03 AM.

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#2 John Tucker

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 08:19 AM

Fantastic!  

 

There are some software setups that will allow you to let the platesolving program drive the mount to the correct coordinates automatically, but I've never figured that out myself. Maybe someone who knows can post the info. 


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#3 happylimpet

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 08:27 AM

NIce work! Satisfying!



#4 petert913

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 08:47 AM

Tiny, isn't it  :)  Surprised me the first time I imaged it.



#5 Creedence

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 09:11 AM

I love the scale of this image.  We always get the close up view of it, but this makes you appreciate it for what it is a little more.  Cool shot!


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#6 psuaero

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 09:22 AM

That's awesome, be very proud! I was trying to get the same target last night and ran into difficulties. What camera were using? How long were you're exposures? What ISO?

 

If I can figure out to get the Ring and my DSLR to line up I'm hoping to do something similar (maybe tonight). It's such a high target for me that the camera hits the mount on my scope.


Edited by psuaero, 20 September 2019 - 09:22 AM.


#7 bobzeq25

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 09:37 AM

Nice start.  A suggestion.

 

Taking the camera calibration frames (bias, flats, darks) will help you learn processing better, now and in the long run.



#8 bobzeq25

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 09:41 AM

Fantastic!  

 

There are some software setups that will allow you to let the platesolving program drive the mount to the correct coordinates automatically, but I've never figured that out myself. Maybe someone who knows can post the info. 

I use Voyager, and it's fun to watch it do it (to less than 1 arc second, takes a few iterations), but it's not something I'd recommend at this point.  Too complicated, there are bigger fish to fry.

 

A (very) little experience with platesolving manually, and I would hit the target on my 2nd image, most of the time.  3rd try, always.  I did that for 1-2 years.

 

If I didn't move the mount 180 degrees the wrong way.  <grin>  Somehow Voyager never does that.  <smile>


Edited by bobzeq25, 20 September 2019 - 09:45 AM.


#9 pkrallis

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 10:10 AM

About 65 years ago the Ring was the first DSO that I found with a paper tube and surplus lenses home made scope.  It became the DSO that I use to measure the quality if seeing and scope capability ever since.  Great Job, keep it up.


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#10 stargazer60

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 10:39 AM

Very nicely done, I agree a very small target.waytogo.gif 



#11 onefatguyseti

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 10:42 AM

NIce! Looks better than my first one! Looking forward to seeing more images from you.



#12 fewayne

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 01:43 PM

Breathes there the astrophotographer who hasn't growled under her breath "All this time looking for the object, I could be SHOOTING PICTURES!"?

 

Everybody loves to flog their own favorite gadgets to beginners. Guilty! But that said, once you get offline plate solving working in Ekos/KStars, having it zero the mount in on the target is as simple as checking a radio button in the user interface. I'm sure plenty of other software can do it easily as well.

 

This was hands-down the best investment I've made in software fiddling so far. Enter your target, ensure the "Slew to target" button is selected, click "Capture and solve", and the software and mount do the rest. Literally that simple.

 

And it can use an online platesolver too, though it'll probably take longer. I don't know because I'm almost never in a position to use it.

 

On a Raspberry Pi 3, solving is a crapshoot. Takes almost a minute, fails maybe a quarter of the time. Still better than eyeballs! Running on my laptop, it takes 2-5 seconds. Rarely it won't work, throwing me back on the old manual techniques, reminding me just how good I normally have it.


Edited by fewayne, 20 September 2019 - 01:43 PM.

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#13 bmhjr

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 02:01 PM

Victory!  Nice job on the persistence that is required at times with this hobby.  



#14 TelescopeGreg

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 04:59 PM

Well done!  M57 was I think my second DSO target, after M13.  Same problem with getting the tiny thing to land on my tiny planetary camera's sensor, but I didn't have the luxury of plate solving at the time.  Very frustrating, as you know.

 

Suggestion for plate solving, give ASTAP a try.  I run it from CCDciel on my Raspberry Pi 3B at the mount, and it plate solves in about 10-15 seconds.  I use the telescope's GoTo to aim the scope where it thinks the target should be, take an image with the camera, plate solve, and then the software tells the mount where it really is aimed at (called a "sync").  Another GoTo on the mount, and I'm usually dead on target.  It's a great technique and skill to master, especially handy for when the target is too dim to see in one image.



#15 Michael Harris

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 05:10 PM

It feels so good when it works out! One of my favorites, M57 never gets old.



#16 Ryan1776

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 09:12 AM

WOW! Thank you everyone for the kind words! 

Especially seeing the results a lot of you get, I'm happy you all liked it! grin.gif

 

Fantastic!  

 

There are some software setups that will allow you to let the platesolving program drive the mount to the correct coordinates automatically, but I've never figured that out myself. Maybe someone who knows can post the info. 

I know! My mount doesn't have that ability. Just a Meade LXD55 mount so pretty archaic in the world of GOTO mounts. 

 

 

I love the scale of this image.  We always get the close up view of it, but this makes you appreciate it for what it is a little more.  Cool shot!

Thank you! Was certainly not planned, but I do like the field of view. smile.gif

 

 

That's awesome, be very proud! I was trying to get the same target last night and ran into difficulties. What camera were using? How long were you're exposures? What ISO?

 

If I can figure out to get the Ring and my DSLR to line up I'm hoping to do something similar (maybe tonight). It's such a high target for me that the camera hits the mount on my scope.

Thanks!!

It's an unmodded Canon T7i aka 800d.

30 second subs. 

400iso

I was using a cheap-o LPF as well. 

https://www.amazon.c...0?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

Looking at what other peoples' settings are, I think I should have used higher ISO. But on the computer screen it looked too bright and blown out. But I think in photoshop I'll be able to adjust the curves to darken it out. Which I actually was able to do with this image as well. 

 

It's very high for me too, so at least it's the least amount of atmosphere to go through. 

 

 

Nice start.  A suggestion.

 

Taking the camera calibration frames (bias, flats, darks) will help you learn processing better, now and in the long run.

OH yeah. Like I said, my battery died so I took some darks the next day. Not ideal, I know. 

 

 

About 65 years ago the Ring was the first DSO that I found with a paper tube and surplus lenses home made scope.  It became the DSO that I use to measure the quality if seeing and scope capability ever since.  Great Job, keep it up.

WOW! That's incredible!

And thank you! 

 

 

Breathes there the astrophotographer who hasn't growled under her breath "All this time looking for the object, I could be SHOOTING PICTURES!"?

 

Everybody loves to flog their own favorite gadgets to beginners. Guilty! But that said, once you get offline plate solving working in Ekos/KStars, having it zero the mount in on the target is as simple as checking a radio button in the user interface. I'm sure plenty of other software can do it easily as well.

 

This was hands-down the best investment I've made in software fiddling so far. Enter your target, ensure the "Slew to target" button is selected, click "Capture and solve", and the software and mount do the rest. Literally that simple.

 

And it can use an online platesolver too, though it'll probably take longer. I don't know because I'm almost never in a position to use it.

 

On a Raspberry Pi 3, solving is a crapshoot. Takes almost a minute, fails maybe a quarter of the time. Still better than eyeballs! Running on my laptop, it takes 2-5 seconds. Rarely it won't work, throwing me back on the old manual techniques, reminding me just how good I normally have it.

 

Well done!  M57 was I think my second DSO target, after M13.  Same problem with getting the tiny thing to land on my tiny planetary camera's sensor, but I didn't have the luxury of plate solving at the time.  Very frustrating, as you know.

 

Suggestion for plate solving, give ASTAP a try.  I run it from CCDciel on my Raspberry Pi 3B at the mount, and it plate solves in about 10-15 seconds.  I use the telescope's GoTo to aim the scope where it thinks the target should be, take an image with the camera, plate solve, and then the software tells the mount where it really is aimed at (called a "sync").  Another GoTo on the mount, and I'm usually dead on target.  It's a great technique and skill to master, especially handy for when the target is too dim to see in one image.

 

 

One day when I grow up and get a real mount, I'll be able to exploit those abilities! 



#17 Ryan1776

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Posted 06 October 2019 - 08:15 AM

With my recent purchase of Astronomy tools and their AstroFlat Pro LP pluggin....

I've done a few mods to my image....

 

Thoughts?!

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • The Ring Nebual.jpg



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