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I Must Admit the Error of My Ways...

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#1 sink45ny

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 10:35 PM

I will be buying a short focal length refractor.

 

 

Why now?

 

 

Because it's been so much fun imaging these two wide fields the last two nights with a Canon 70-200 lens and there's two mounts in the observatory. Maybe I can actually walk and chew gum at the same time.

The Stellarvue SVX080T-3FT (with 3" feathertouch focuser) has caught my eye. Only hurdle is to price out the cost of side by side mounting with existing refractor.

 

Tak shmak, I always wanted to say that.

I even like my screw up images. Here's the veil nebula, in the upper left, it should be centered. It's in the star rich backbone of our Milky Way galaxy.

 

integration ABE

 

The North American(NGC7000) and Pelican Nebulas. They are located in the Milky Way (backbone) hence the rich star field.

 

ngc7000 ABE1 2

 


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#2 pyrasanth

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Posted 24 September 2019 - 02:18 AM

Wide field imaging is very appealing. I have a Celestron 11" RASA that has not been used for nearly 3 years. I have every single accessory for it other than a mount of sufficient capacity to carry it. I hope to get the new mount in the next few months then I will be back in the wide field game.

 

Close up imaging is great- the details are wonderful but the guiding requirements and good weather requirements can be very wearing. I am looking forward to simpler imaging.


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#3 OleCuss

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Posted 24 September 2019 - 04:28 AM

Why should the Veil Nebula be centered?  I know that it is common in AP to do that but especially for wide-field AP that is not necessarily the best framing.

 

We tend to forget the Rule of Thirds.  It isn't always how we should frame things (especially if our target fills most of our FOV), but often in wide-field imaging following the Rule of Thirds can be a good thing.

 

Do what works for you.  You don't have to do the standard centering of the target and you may find something else pleases you.


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#4 pyrasanth

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Posted 24 September 2019 - 09:40 AM

Why should the Veil Nebula be centered?  I know that it is common in AP to do that but especially for wide-field AP that is not necessarily the best framing.

 

We tend to forget the Rule of Thirds.  It isn't always how we should frame things (especially if our target fills most of our FOV), but often in wide-field imaging following the Rule of Thirds can be a good thing.

 

Do what works for you.  You don't have to do the standard centering of the target and you may find something else pleases you.

Well- the "norm" is central for pretty pictures but how many interesting objects have been lost in the field because of this political correctness- I guess lots- so we should ignore convention and go where our optics land us. Don't get me started either on the subject of correct image orientation- it really annoys the hell out of me when somebody points out that my image has not been mirror corrected!

 

However for multiple imaging sessions I tend to plate solve on the target which puts it in the center of the field- that is just convenient from one night to the next and I have no feelings about the art position of the target.


Edited by pyrasanth, 24 September 2019 - 09:43 AM.

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#5 daquad

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Posted 28 September 2019 - 12:40 PM

Well- the "norm" is central for pretty pictures but how many interesting objects have been lost in the field because of this political correctness- I guess lots- so we should ignore convention and go where our optics land us. Don't get me started either on the subject of correct image orientation- it really annoys the hell out of me when somebody points out that my image has not been mirror corrected!

 

However for multiple imaging sessions I tend to plate solve on the target which puts it in the center of the field- that is just convenient from one night to the next and I have no feelings about the art position of the target.

Especially since, in the southern hemisphere the view is rotated 180 degrees.  So who is to say what is the correct orientation.


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#6 pyrasanth

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Posted 28 September 2019 - 02:02 PM

Especially since, in the southern hemisphere the view is rotated 180 degrees.  So who is to say what is the correct orientation.

I honestly believe that there is no "correct" orientation- it all depends on your viewing place in the universe and the perspective will change especially for the multitudes of aliens in other galaxies imaging our Milky Way Galaxy!


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