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Free Protozoa and invertebrate information and care manual

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15 replies to this topic

#1 vertex2100

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Posted 06 October 2019 - 11:53 AM

I like free. Can't get better than that. Here is a nice free manual from Carolina Biological Supply about raising and observing the Protozoa and invertebrates that they are happy to sell to you. https://www.carolina...vert-Manual.pdf
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#2 stevie

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Posted 10 October 2019 - 11:30 AM

Cool, thanks! :)



#3 vertex2100

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 01:14 PM

They actually have many pages of free literature on the Carolina website.
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#4 Astroman007

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Posted 15 October 2019 - 11:05 AM

I like free. Can't get better than that. Here is a nice free manual from Carolina Biological Supply about raising and observing the Protozoa and invertebrates that they are happy to sell to you. https://www.carolina...vert-Manual.pdf

Fascinating!



#5 Hugh Peck

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Posted 15 October 2019 - 05:04 PM

After 30 years of 'diligent research" I have finally bought a microscope. Your post is much appreciated. Thank you for the link.


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#6 vertex2100

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Posted 16 October 2019 - 11:15 AM

Welcome, Hugh. I think it is a good complimentary hobby for amateur astronomers for daytime and cloudy nights. Explore and learn about both the large objects and the small ones in the universe and on Earth.
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#7 Hugh Peck

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Posted 16 October 2019 - 11:27 AM

Seriously, I've been thinking about it since the '80s. Not procrastinating, mind you, doing research. Honest. grin.gif 

 

The problem is, despite all my "research" I have used a microscope since I was in college. Bought a couple of books for ideas and basic use to get started, Adventures With A Microscope: Headstrom, and Exploring With The Microscope: Nachtigall. Winter observing isn't something I can do any more except for very short periods of time. It's takes longer to get prepared than the time observing so a microscope is it. 


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#8 vertex2100

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Posted 17 October 2019 - 08:28 AM

Seriously, I've been thinking about it since the '80s. Not procrastinating, mind you, doing research. Honest. grin.gif
 
The problem is, despite all my "research" I have used a microscope since I was in college. Bought a couple of books for ideas and basic use to get started, Adventures With A Microscope: Headstrom, and Exploring With The Microscope: Nachtigall. Winter observing isn't something I can do any more except for very short periods of time. It's takes longer to get prepared than the time observing so a microscope is it.

What's really nice is that we can buy older, high quality microscopes for a very cheap price. Both my kids are science majors, daughter neuroscience and son premed so I bought both of them
really nice used and new old stock AO scopes for less than a hundred dollars each and prepared sets of slides. They probably won't have much ambition to make many of their own slides except for my daughter checking out her fish tank creatures so good that the prepared ones are pretty cheap also. I got both of their microscopes on eBay from the plant pathologist that sells them. He tests them and will tell you the truth about them so is very reputable. He even took photos through each of the objectives for the ad. How is this unused AO scope for quality and value for only 90 bucks? Beats a new, Chinese one of the same price any day on quality. image.jpeg

Edited by vertex2100, 17 October 2019 - 08:49 AM.


#9 vertex2100

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Posted 17 October 2019 - 08:34 AM

Here is his page on eBay. He only has one regular and one polarizing scope on there at this time but you can watch for future ones. He says he has lots. https://www.ebay.com...=1&_ipg=&_from=

Edited by vertex2100, 17 October 2019 - 08:51 AM.


#10 vertex2100

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Posted 17 October 2019 - 09:00 AM

Hugh, I see you said that you bought one scope already. Did you get one of the new ones or a vintage one? Can't have too many scopes of any sort. Is it working well? Find any tartigrades yet?

#11 Hugh Peck

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Posted 17 October 2019 - 10:08 AM

I bought a new one because I wouldn't be able to tell if a used one was any good. It's an AmScope B120C. I'm guessing it's a hobbyist or high school level model. It just arrived yesterday and it was set up and tested to make sure everything works but that it. Ordered some prepared slides yesterday for an idea of what things look like and make sure I can focus properly, etc.  


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#12 vertex2100

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Posted 17 October 2019 - 02:14 PM

Great. Hope it works well. Lots of biological and inorganic things that you can look at. I like working on things , like restoring cars, and so does my son so I bought him several vintage scopes to give to him at Christmas that he can play around with cleaning up and restoring. Something he can do in his dorm while taking a break from studying.

#13 Microscopy

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Posted 03 November 2019 - 04:49 PM

Another great source for culture media for breeding all kinds of protozoa and such is an old catalogue from the ATCC (American Type Culture Collection). My copy (1977) contains hundreds off recipes of growth media and such.

 

Ah, it reminds me of the old days, when I was busy in the kitchen preparing my own brain-hart agar, using, you guessed it, calf hearts and cattle brains.

Bacteriology always has been kind of a cookbook science, and many of the old techniques are still in use. The only difference between now and the old days is that lab technicians aren't busy anymore preparing beef, hearts, brains, bile and blood.

Growth media are these days delivered in throw away polystyrene petri dishes and test tubes by specialised companies.


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#14 Hugh Peck

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Posted 03 November 2019 - 04:56 PM

Had forgotten about this thread and the link. And I even have it in my Microscope folder. I'm a genius, you know. grin.gif 

 

Ah, it reminds me of the old days, when I was busy in the kitchen preparing my own brain-hart agar, using, you guessed it, calf hearts and cattle brains.

 

Nothing personal, but I'm glad I didn't know you then. Just sayin'. lol.gif 



#15 Microscopy

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Posted 03 November 2019 - 05:03 PM

Have I ever told the story on how I tried to make a slide of a degraded human egg cell? It involved lots of fruit juice jars filled with formaldehyde, lol. I didn't succeed.

 

On a sidenote, on culturing critters: one of the authoritative guides on identifying microscopic organisms here in Western Europe remains "Das Leben im Wassertropfen" (translates to something like "Life in a drop of water") by two Germans: Heinz Streble and Dieter Krauter (see: https://www.amazon.c...e/dp/344012634X). The book contains some brief notes on culturing protozoa and such. As a first, the book advised to use "Fundort Wasser". That was before internet/Google translate and I didn't had a German/Dutch dictionary, so it took me quite some time untill I found out that that mysterious "Fundort Wasser" was only the water the critters were found in. Since then I'm known as "the smart Fundort Wasser guy".


Edited by Microscopy, 04 November 2019 - 04:11 AM.


#16 kosmosoved

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Posted 03 December 2019 - 08:19 AM

Hey, everybody! Excellent selection of practical articles on microscopy. The truth is in Russian. Interesting introduction, friends!

https://m.vk.com/top...033808_39125149


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