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Bad eyepiece eye

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#1 CygnuS

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Posted 06 October 2019 - 10:32 PM

I'm sure I'm not onto something but I just thought I would put this out there anyways.  I've been lucky with my vision. At 59 I have never wore glasses (except "readers" the past few years) but now I'm due for full time glasses since my right eye is going bad. I've been an avid amateur for over 20 years, with the majority of my observing done with a 10 inch Dob, looking with my right eye. I'm not claiming that is why my right eye went bad. I'm simply asking if any research has been done on this. If not, have any of you long time observers had your eyepiece eye be the first to go bad? 

I'm making no assumptions here since I have been assured that things like Venus at high magnification are no danger.....still, just thought I'd ask. 



#2 B 26354

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Posted 06 October 2019 - 10:49 PM

Been a dedicated (right-eye) DSO visual observer for the past sixty-five years. I started needing distance eyeglasses when I was about fifty... but except for a very small difference in the directionality of the small amount of astigmatism that each eye has, the rather mild prescription for each eye is about the same.



#3 TOMDEY

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Posted 06 October 2019 - 11:04 PM

The only significant change seems to be that people who do a lot of close-scrutiny work... tend to trend myopic. But, even that is subject to cause/effect debate, because the old bookworm saw could correlate with intelligence, and therefore genetics (IQ having a strong genetic component). Maybe the book didn't do it, but the intelligence gene might favor myopes. Stuff like that.

 

Anyway, your eye doesn't know it's looking into an eyepiece or directly at a scene. So viewing with optical devices should have no mechanism that would degrade or ~use up~ vision. Also the watching TV or PC ruining your eyes, etc... bunko. Unhealthy practices, sure... but blowing your eyes... nah... the brain itself no doubt goes vestigial from those... but not the eyes.

 

[looking at the too-bright sun would of course damage... but certainly not stars, the moon, or planets!]

 

PS is your degradation just needing eye glasses --- or something of serious concern?!    Tom


Edited by TOMDEY, 06 October 2019 - 11:04 PM.

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#4 CygnuS

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Posted 07 October 2019 - 06:20 AM

Thanks for these early responses. Tomdey, I haven't been to the eye doctor yet so can't answer your question. 



#5 Todd N

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Posted 07 October 2019 - 10:00 AM

Yes, might right viewing eye has become far worse than my left and has accelerated in the last few years; I'm 46.  In the last four years I had developed a chronic inflammatory condition in my eyes due to infection but it is manageable and is still under a doctor's care. The eye medicine I take has potential damaging effects but my eyes tolerate it very well so, I tend to think that it may have had nothing to do with it. My eyes started to slip before this condition anyways and since I see the doctor for routine check ups, nothing extraordinary is noted. My nearsighted vision is affected and in the last two years I have had to use reading glasses. I've nevertheless wondered if viewing somehow harmed my eyes despite the general consensus that it will not in case of the bright moon or perhaps my white light solar filters aren't so safe?

 

 



#6 CygnuS

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Posted 07 October 2019 - 11:22 AM

That is interesting Todd. Of course even if 90 out of 100 astronomers here have experienced their eyepiece eye being the first to go bad, that would not be enough to draw a conclusion. That is why I am wondering if anybody has done any extensive research on this. 



#7 llanitedave

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Posted 07 October 2019 - 06:49 PM

Like handedness, we all have a dominant eye.  I don't know if that means it wears out faster or not.  My vision has definitely deteriorated slightly differently in each eye.  It's my left eye that's worst, which is also my dominant (and eyepiece) eye.

 

Interestingly, though, when at the telescope I do not require glasses for either eye as long as the focus and collimation are on point.



#8 DaveC2042

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Posted 07 October 2019 - 10:45 PM

Have you considered the possibility that the reason you are noticing more deterioration in your right eye is simply that it is the eye you use most, so you notice it more?


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#9 CygnuS

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Posted 08 October 2019 - 11:03 AM

Like handedness, we all have a dominant eye. 

How do we know which one is dominant? Is it as simple as which one has the best vision? If so, then the dominant eye can switch. 

I wonder if a person who is looking through a telescope for the first time naturally uses their dominate eye without even thinking. A person who picks up a rifle with a scope would naturally aim it using their dominate hand. I wonder if your dominate hand is usually the same as your dominate eye. It probably would have been if cavemen would have evolved with rifles. Humans did evolve with bows and arrows so that would be similar. 



#10 CygnuS

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Posted 08 October 2019 - 11:06 AM

Have you considered the possibility that the reason you are noticing more deterioration in your right eye is simply that it is the eye you use most, so you notice it more?

Interesting thought. Maybe we don't even realize we use our dominate eye most since they're open an equal time except for eyepiece time. 



#11 llanitedave

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Posted 08 October 2019 - 11:58 PM

How do we know which one is dominant? Is it as simple as which one has the best vision? If so, then the dominant eye can switch. 

I wonder if a person who is looking through a telescope for the first time naturally uses their dominate eye without even thinking. A person who picks up a rifle with a scope would naturally aim it using their dominate hand. I wonder if your dominate hand is usually the same as your dominate eye. It probably would have been if cavemen would have evolved with rifles. Humans did evolve with bows and arrows so that would be similar. 

 

In most people, it's pretty straightforward.  One side or the other is dominant -- hand, arm, eye, leg, fine motor control, and strength.  Most people throw with the same hand they write with.  There are a few exceptions, though.  I'm an example of mixed dominance.  My strength is on the right side, and my fine motor control is on the left.  I throw right handed, and write left handed.  In archery, I pull back the bow with my right hand and aim with my right eye.  In shooting, I fire a rifle on the left side.  I was never very accurate in throwing or in archery, but I easily qualified for sharpshooter in the military.  My left eye was always the sharpest until recently, now it's the worst. 

 

I do wonder, if the fine motor control side shifted to the left because my left eye was better, or if it was just an inborn trait.



#12 TOMDEY

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Posted 09 October 2019 - 09:44 AM

I started out as a leftie... then got to kindergarten and the nuns enjoyed beating that out of me, forcing me to do things with my right hand. That actually worked out wonderfully, forcing me to become fully-ambidextrous and every other parity function: Write, eat, scissors, hammer, saw, throw/pitch, catch, shoot, etc. Years later they were having try-outs for the band. Well, of course, all the still-primal boys wanted to be drummers... but they only needed a few. So the music director had us tap out coordination things with our hands and feet. Culminating with the interestingly syncopated Bossa Nova riff! He even asked me who I was taking lessons from... "No one, yet, father." Years later I was playing with military, club, show, jazz and rock bands! Funny the way things play out. I've been interested in symmetry ever since... even taking the time to delve into stuff like that hallmark tau/theta symmetry violation. To the Church's credit... the Jesuits and Basilians never tried to beat the primal out of us... indeed... they reinforced and encouraged it! That inoculated me from the eventual rise of that entirely-unnatural political-correctness epidemic... immunized for life; the eyes have it, both equally!   Tom

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#13 mich_al

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Posted 09 October 2019 - 09:59 AM

I didn't go to Catholic schools so I got to stay a leftie, but in life most every time I was shown how to do something (bat a ball, shoot a rifle, etc) I was shown by a rightie and sometimes I stayed with that protocol. Now I do many things ambidextrously.  Many lefties have issues in the right handed world but I never have and see it as an advantage. My only leftie issue is finding a place to sit and eat comfortably with a bunch of righties.


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#14 ColoHank

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Posted 13 October 2019 - 12:02 AM

Just be patient.  The vision in your other eye will probably go south as you age further.  Then you'll have a matched set again.



#15 Jim_V

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Posted 13 October 2019 - 09:59 AM

I started out as a leftie... then got to kindergarten and the nuns enjoyed beating that out of me, forcing me to do things with my right hand.

 

I to was one who when I picked up the crayon to colour, in my left hand, they placed in my right...

50 some years later, I have still have strangely poor penmanship, or right handed dexterity, with my left, things are much more co-ordinate...


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#16 llanitedave

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Posted 13 October 2019 - 10:53 AM

I to was one who when I picked up the crayon to colour, in my left hand, they placed in my right...

50 some years later, I have still have strangely poor penmanship, or right handed dexterity, with my left, things are much more co-ordinate...

In second grade, I found what I considered a very clever way around the teacher's "corrections".  She wasn't very observant of us as we worked, but she could tell by the slant of our letters whether we were writing with the left or right hand.  I just rotated my paper until the slant appeared to be that of a right-hander, and she never gave me trouble after that.  I've been writing in that weird way ever since.


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#17 rowdy388

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Posted 13 October 2019 - 11:35 AM

In second grade, I found what I considered a very clever way around the teacher's "corrections".  She wasn't very observant of us as we worked, but she could tell by the slant of our letters whether we were writing with the left or right hand.  I just rotated my paper until the slant appeared to be that of a right-hander, and she never gave me trouble after that.  I've been writing in that weird way ever since.

I'm left handed and did that trick also, having the correct "slant", but my hand tended to smear

the ink as it passed over the freshly written letters. My teacher found me out anyways.


Edited by rowdy388, 13 October 2019 - 11:36 AM.

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#18 Jim_V

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Posted 13 October 2019 - 11:36 AM

In second grade, I found what I considered a very clever way around the teacher's "corrections".  She wasn't very observant of us as we worked, but she could tell by the slant of our letters whether we were writing with the left or right hand.  I just rotated my paper until the slant appeared to be that of a right-hander, and she never gave me trouble after that.  I've been writing in that weird way ever since.

I was never given the opportunity, they switched me in Kindergarten, in fact even in baseball I had to learn to catch "left handed" since all my older siblings ( I am the youngest) were right handed. As such all the gloves (2 shared amongst 4 since food came before sports) were left handed. Hockey and Golf are the only two sports in which I am only left handed.  I can throw and bat equally well with either hand. 


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#19 llanitedave

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Posted 14 October 2019 - 10:06 AM

I'm left handed and did that trick also, having the correct "slant", but my hand tended to smear

the ink as it passed over the freshly written letters. My teacher found me out anyways.

Yeah, I still have to be careful of smearing.




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