Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Recently new books on binocular astronomy...

This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
15 replies to this topic

#1 NorthCoast

NorthCoast

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 2308
  • Joined: 05 Dec 2004

Posted 21 June 2006 - 11:24 PM

I was doing a forum search to see if there were any new books on binocular (or applicable small scope) astronomy. I didn't find anything recent. It could just be my search query, but, has anything new that is worthy of purchase hit the press in the last year or so?

Thanks,
Mark

#2 NorthCoast

NorthCoast

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 2308
  • Joined: 05 Dec 2004

Posted 21 June 2006 - 11:38 PM

I also assume that Binocular Astronomy by Craig Crossen & Wil Tirion is still a good choice?

Thanks,
Mark

#3 John F

John F

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 932
  • Joined: 16 Feb 2004

Posted 22 June 2006 - 12:50 AM

Crossen also has a newer book out titled Sky Vista's. Here is a link to it on Amazon that contains more info about it. I have it and recommend it but I'd get his other book Binocular Astronomy first before this one.

John Finnan

http://www.amazon.co...ng=UTF8&s=books

#4 edwincjones

edwincjones

    Close Enough

  • *****
  • Posts: 12619
  • Joined: 10 Apr 2004

Posted 22 June 2006 - 06:14 AM

The Crossen book seems high at $60 which is 2-3X more than Binocular Astronomy-why? Is it worth it?

edj

#5 Wes James

Wes James

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5505
  • Joined: 12 Apr 2006

Posted 22 June 2006 - 06:42 AM

How about "Binocular Stargazing" by Prof. Mike D. Reynolds? You can find it at Amazon.com. It was released in Nov., 2005. At $10.62, it's a good buy.
I just received the Crossen book 2 weeks ago. It is a highly technical book, might be a bit difficult to read for beginners.Even it's basics of sky movement are rather wordy and not very simplified. Really only about 5 pages on the aspects of binoculars themselves, and then it goes into various chapters of the constellations of the different seasons. Binoculars are addressed, as they discuss the various sights suitable for binoculars, but it's really quite a dry & technical book. I would say that Mike Reynolds book is not as dry. Having taken a basic astronomy class under him, I will say that he makes astronomy exciting.

#6 EdZ

EdZ

    Professor EdZ

  • *****
  • Posts: 18849
  • Joined: 15 Feb 2002

Posted 22 June 2006 - 07:29 AM

These are not necessarily new books, but these are the links to most all the other threads in the binocular forum with suggestions for recommended books for binocular viewing. As always, refer to the "Best Of" links. edz

Useful Books for Binocular Observers

#7 Les

Les

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 888
  • Joined: 22 Apr 2006

Posted 22 June 2006 - 08:07 AM

Reynold's book was the last one I have read and I would also recommend it. For the most part, I have been disappointed in most of the "classic" binocular books. They are about as exciting/interesting as an Excel spreadsheet.

Les

#8 NorthCoast

NorthCoast

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 2308
  • Joined: 05 Dec 2004

Posted 22 June 2006 - 09:25 AM

These are not necessarily new books, but these are the links to most all the other threads in the binocular forum with suggestions for recommended books for binocular viewing. As always, refer to the "Best Of" links. edz

Useful Books for Binocular Observers


Thanks Ed. As always I started there first. Just wanted to know if there was anything newly published that is worthy of purchasing.

Later,
Mark

#9 EdZ

EdZ

    Professor EdZ

  • *****
  • Posts: 18849
  • Joined: 15 Feb 2002

Posted 22 June 2006 - 09:30 AM

"Modern Moon" by Charles Wood

see this thread

"Modern Moon"

edz

#10 Glassthrower

Glassthrower

    Vendor - Galactic Stone & Ironworks

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 18455
  • Joined: 07 Apr 2005

Posted 22 June 2006 - 01:16 PM

"StarWatch" by Phil Harrington was published in 2003. I'm not sure if that is "new" for the purposes of this thread. It's a very good book though it is not specifically targeted towards binoculars. It is a seasonal guide to DSOs (mostly Messiers and NGCs) that has excellent finder charts. A detailed description of each object is given as it appears with 1) naked eye, 2) binoculars, and 3) medium scope. Unlike many other similar books that I own, this one comes outside with me when I observe - the finder charts are that good (to me) ... It also has a nice beginners section with all the basics of stargazing and starhopping. A very good all-around observing book (and good for binoculars).

Clear dark skies...

MikeG

#11 John F

John F

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 932
  • Joined: 16 Feb 2004

Posted 22 June 2006 - 11:28 PM

Unlike Binocular Astronomy which is oriented towards binocular observers in general and 10x50 users in particular, the Sky Vistas is aimed at rich field observers and can be profitably used for naked eye astronomy, mono viewing with a rich-field telescope or binocular observers. It describes more objects than Binocular Astronomy does (and often in greater detail). It also includes a lot of color pictures which no doubt contributes to its much higher cost.

For a basic binocular observing guide Binocular Astonomy is a better value plus it has those nice Wil Tirion star charts in the back that are scaled to be especially useful to binocular observers. I consider Binocular Astronomy to be a must-have book for binocular star gazers and Sky Vistas to be a nice-to-have.

John Finnan

#12 NorthCoast

NorthCoast

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 2308
  • Joined: 05 Dec 2004

Posted 23 June 2006 - 07:44 PM

"Modern Moon" by Charles Wood

see this thread

"Modern Moon"

edz


Thanks Ed!

I enjoy the articles in S&T and keep a second copy of the S&T 2004 issue with the Lunar 100 with my charts. I'll check out Wood's book... :)

Mark

#13 NorthCoast

NorthCoast

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 2308
  • Joined: 05 Dec 2004

Posted 23 June 2006 - 07:46 PM

"StarWatch" by Phil Harrington was published in 2003. I'm not sure if that is "new" for the purposes of this thread. It's a very good book though it is not specifically targeted towards binoculars. It is a seasonal guide to DSOs (mostly Messiers and NGCs) that has excellent finder charts. A detailed description of each object is given as it appears with 1) naked eye, 2) binoculars, and 3) medium scope. Unlike many other similar books that I own, this one comes outside with me when I observe - the finder charts are that good (to me) ... It also has a nice beginners section with all the basics of stargazing and starhopping. A very good all-around observing book (and good for binoculars).

Clear dark skies...

MikeG



Thanks Mike, I have this book and find it very useful. :)

#14 NorthCoast

NorthCoast

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 2308
  • Joined: 05 Dec 2004

Posted 23 June 2006 - 07:48 PM

Unlike Binocular Astronomy which is oriented towards binocular observers in general and 10x50 users in particular, the Sky Vistas is aimed at rich field observers and can be profitably used for naked eye astronomy, mono viewing with a rich-field telescope or binocular observers. It describes more objects than Binocular Astronomy does (and often in greater detail). It also includes a lot of color pictures which no doubt contributes to its much higher cost.

For a basic binocular observing guide Binocular Astonomy is a better value plus it has those nice Wil Tirion star charts in the back that are scaled to be especially useful to binocular observers. I consider Binocular Astronomy to be a must-have book for binocular star gazers and Sky Vistas to be a nice-to-have.

John Finnan


John,

Thank you for the additonal information.

Later,
Mark

#15 Bob W6PU

Bob W6PU

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2278
  • Joined: 23 Dec 2004

Posted 23 June 2006 - 08:08 PM

"Turn Left At Orion" by Guy Consolmagno, and Dan Davis.

This is an excellent, illistrated primer that was origionaly intended for 60mm refractors. Published first in 1989 by Cambridge University Press. Mine is the 1995 edition.

I bought my hardcover version for $16 at Amazon.com. It has 100 objects for the small telescope or, I would say, 10X50 or larger more powerfull binoculars!

Bob in NM
10" F/5 Coast Inst. Treckerscope Newt.

11X80 Vixen, 15X70 Oberwerk, 7X50 USN B&L, 7X50 Hensoldt/Zeiss, 8X30w Swarovski

#16 NorthCoast

NorthCoast

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 2308
  • Joined: 05 Dec 2004

Posted 23 June 2006 - 09:23 PM

"Turn Left At Orion" by Guy Consolmagno, and Dan Davis.

This is an excellent, illistrated primer that was origionaly intended for 60mm refractors. Published first in 1989 by Cambridge University Press. Mine is the 1995 edition.

I bought my hardcover version for $16 at Amazon.com. It has 100 objects for the small telescope or, I would say, 10X50 or larger more powerfull binoculars!

Bob in NM


Thanks Bob, I have that one too. I was really looking to see if anything new had been published recently... ;)


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics