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Southern messier"ish" marathon

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#1 OrionD

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Posted 08 October 2019 - 03:37 PM

Hello, let me present myself im Lucas Lima and i live in south Brazil (paraná to be exact) , im part of a local astronomy group, i was talking with some of the members and we came up with an idea for a event, a messier marathon but we thought we might have a problem due to our location, as i said we live in the southern hemisphere and this means we can´t see all the 110 objects , so my question is:

 

-Can we still make the event with less objects ?

and if so there´s any other non messier objects i can include in the list ?

 

-Did any of you organized or participated of this type of event, if so can you guys share some tips to help us out ?

 

 

 

thanks.



#2 BradFran

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Posted 08 October 2019 - 04:33 PM

Check out the Jack Bennett catalog, made by a South African comet hunter:

http://assa.saao.ac....nett-catalogue/

http://www.hawastsoc...ky/bennett.html


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#3 Jim1804

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Posted 09 October 2019 - 09:46 PM

Consider a “ Caldwell Marathon”. The Caldwell catalog includes outstanding objects from both hemispheres. You won’t be able to see some of them, but you’ll be able to see some of the best ones.
A quick search in SkySafari showed ~60 objects from both the M and C catalogs visible. If you wanted to get to 110, you could add in the best of the southern NGC objects.
Either way, establish your own “rules”, and have fun!

#4 Redbetter

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 04:10 AM

Check out the Jack Bennett catalog, made by a South African comet hunter:

http://assa.saao.ac....nett-catalogue/

http://www.hawastsoc...ky/bennett.html

This is my suggestion as well.  It is in the same spirit as Messier's catalog, but appropriate for the Southern Hemisphere.   They are all south of the 0 degrees, so there is a good chance they can all be seen/or nearly all seen during an appropriate new Moon period.  Surely someone has already set up a Bennett marathon in Australia, South America, South Africa, etc?  If not, it looks ripe for the picking.

 

I have seen many of these objects from northern locations and there are some real beauties that I would like to observe further south where they would be better placed with greater contrast higher in the sky and likely in darker skies as well.  If I were to pick a list of bright and beautiful for a single night in the Southern hemisphere many of these would be on it.  No doubt some southern observers could supplement with some brighter/larger objects not already on it, but this is a good starting point. 

 

The disappointing thing about the links is that they don't list object type.  I have been meaning to update my decades' old list of observations of some objects from this catalog...looks like a good opportunity to do it right with recent observations as well.


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#5 BradFran

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 06:00 AM

The second link does include type. Here is a third:

 

http://www.messier.s...ar/bennett.html

 

There is also a book available from the Webb Deep-Sky Society, but I haven't seen it in person.


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#6 Redbetter

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 01:57 PM

You are right, it does include type.  Not sure how I missed that other than I had looked through several other links first that didn't include type...



#7 Redbetter

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 07:34 PM

From what I found looking through my observing logs, I have observed at least 87 of the 152 Bennett Catalog targets.  Another ~18 would be reasonable to observe from my latitude and a half dozen others could likely be detected if I had a southern horizon clear of obstructions (trees...) with good transparency and no major light domes. 



#8 sgottlieb

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 09:40 PM

I have the Webb Society book, which is by Jenny Kay (from Australia) and Magda Streicher (from South Africa), both very experienced observers.

 

The book includes separate descriptions from both women of 130 objects using scopes from 8" to 16" and some sketches.  There are no finder charts except a series of 4 maps generating using MegaStar that show the distribution of the Bennett objects.  In addition, there's a supplemental table that Bennett compiled of 22 "comet-like" objects in a 12 cm refractor at 21x.  About half of these are bright galaxies.  So, in total there are 152 deep sky objects.

 

There are probably some bright, showpiece objects left off -- I immediately noticed NGC 346, the amazing object in the SMC and visible with the slightest optical aid -- is missing, but I'm not going to quibble.  Overall, it's an excellent list.


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#9 timokarhula

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Posted Yesterday, 08:53 AM

The Night Sky Observer's Guide, Volume 3, also include the Bennett Objects list.  You can find it there on pages 395-398.  I have observed all the 152 Bennett objects, except for the galaxy NGC3923 in Hydra.  It was situated too low in the September evening sky as seen from Western Australia.  NGC3923 is by the way the only galaxy brighter than V=10.0 which I have not logged yet.

 

/Timo Karhula


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