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Filters for Eyepieces for APM 120s

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#1 photobookie

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Posted 13 October 2019 - 02:07 PM

My APM 120s are arriving next week (hopefully! -- I'm excited!) and I've got the following 1-1/4" eyepieces on order: Morpheus 6.5, 12.5 and APM 24s.

 

What are the ideal filters and brands for viewing the moon (neutral density, polarizing, etc.), nebulae (O3, UHC) through Bortle 5 light polluted skies and, of course dark skies (perhaps different filters for each)?

 

Would love your feedback! 

Rick


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#2 Allan Wade

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Posted 14 October 2019 - 01:51 AM

That’s some sweet eyepieces you are starting off with, you will enjoy those a lot.

 

I have lots of 2” filter options for mono viewing, and it’s a one second job to slide them in and out of view in the filter slide. I find it a bit of an effort to swap multiple filters and eyepieces each time in the binoscope. So I bought the most versatile filter In the Lumicon UHC. I bought one pair of those in 1.25” and that satisfies all my filter desires in the binoscopes.

 

They are very enjoyable in the APM120, especially panning up and down the Milky Way at low and mid power. That’s from my dark site, but they will be valuable at Bortle 5 as well.

 

I own no ND or polarising type filters, and I think they are especially unnecessary in the APM120.

 

So my tip is start with a pair of narrow band, UHC type filters of your choice. You may find like me that’s all you need. I’ve used all the top brands and rate the Lumicon and TeleVue as best. The Astronomik and DGM NPB are very good as well.



#3 photobookie

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Posted 14 October 2019 - 04:00 PM

Hi Allan, Thanks for your response. 

 

So will the Lumicon UHC's make the North American and Veil nebulae dramatically more distinctive?  If not what other filters would be more appropriate? 

 

Rick



#4 duck2k

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Posted 14 October 2019 - 10:21 PM

My APM 120s are arriving next week (hopefully! -- I'm excited!) and I've got the following 1-1/4" eyepieces on order: Morpheus 6.5, 12.5 and APM 24s.

 

What are the ideal filters and brands for viewing the moon (neutral density, polarizing, etc.), nebulae (O3, UHC) through Bortle 5 light polluted skies and, of course dark skies (perhaps different filters for each)?

 

Would love your feedback! 

Rick

Great eyepiece set.  I use them quite frequently.  I do have the 17.5 Morphs which are real good. I have never had any problems with UHC’s.  I own Lumicon as well.:)



#5 Allan Wade

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Posted 15 October 2019 - 02:18 AM

Hi Allan, Thanks for your response. 

 

So will the Lumicon UHC's make the North American and Veil nebulae dramatically more distinctive?  If not what other filters would be more appropriate? 

 

Rick

Yes, dramatically is a good way to describe the improved view. The Lumicon UHC and APM120 are a great combination for observing those nebula and I couldn't think of a better filter option in this case. Be sure to use your low power/24mm eyepieces for a bright exit pupil and best framing of these large targets.


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#6 photobookie

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Posted 15 October 2019 - 04:32 AM

Thanks Allan,  Have you tried just viewing with one filter in one eyepiece and none in the other?

 

I do something similar using contact lenses (mono vision). One eye has a near focusing lens and the other eye with a distance lens correction. My brain merges the images beautifully and I forget that the focus is different for each eye. No bifocals needed!

 

Seems like binocular telescopes would work like that too, but instead of different focus points, there could be different filters in each eyepiece, or one and none.

 

Can't wait to try this! My 120s are scheduled to arrive early next week!



#7 Allan Wade

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Posted 15 October 2019 - 07:21 AM

I did try that once. Just one UHC filter in place. I didn’t like it personally, the image seemed strange to me. Having filters in both eyepieces looked a lot more pure.

 

You are going to really enjoy owning your own 120’s. Don’t forget to post photos.



#8 MB_PL

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Posted 15 October 2019 - 12:20 PM

I have a pair of UHC and OIII filters. If you can afford one pair, I too suggest you only get the UHCs, which are definitely more versatile. But I prefer the OIIIs on certain targets, for example on the Veil and Helix nebulae, and most small planetaries. But you have to use the UHCs for the Cacoon and California. And they are better on certain nebulae, e.g. M42, M45. Then again I prefer M27 and M57 unfiltered.
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#9 jdown

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Posted 15 October 2019 - 02:32 PM

I have a pair of UHC and OIII filters. If you can afford one pair, I too suggest you only get the UHCs, which are definitely more versatile. But I prefer the OIIIs on certain targets, for example on the Veil and Helix nebulae, and most small planetaries. But you have to use the UHCs for the Cacoon and California. And they are better on certain nebulae, e.g. M42, M45. Then again I prefer M27 and M57 unfiltered.

My experience with M27 was similar to yours.  I observed it in my APM 120mm, APM 24mm EPs and a Lumicon UHC filter in one EP but not the other.  The UHC darkened the background some.  But the apparent size of M27 was the same with or without the filter.




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