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Am I Crazy?

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#1 Kyphoron

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Posted 14 October 2019 - 04:57 AM

Hi All.

 

  Am I crazy or do others keep records of their meteorites?  I use 5x8 inch index cards placing a picture of the specimen and information from the Meteoritical Bulletin Database. I also would like to know how others keep tabs on their collections.

 

  Here is an example of one of the index cards that I have with a meteorite currently in my collection.

 

 

Barn.jpg  


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#2 MikeTahtib

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Posted 14 October 2019 - 06:57 AM

I'm not a meteorite collector, but it seems like if you don't keep track of all that information, you lose a lot fo the importance of the sample.  I would certainly want to know as much about it as possible.  

I am curious, though, how can you tell a meteorite when you find one?  How can you tell a meteorite from any other rock, if it isn't obviously melted?  This is an aspect f the hobby I have't partici[ated in, and now that I see one from Barnstable (not TOO far from me), I wonder if I would know one if I found it.



#3 lee14

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Posted 14 October 2019 - 07:37 AM

The most important information to keep, if available, is the provenance. The record of where you acquired it, from whom, and where they got it and how they identified it as belonging to a particular fall. The specific data on a particular type can always be found, and is certainly important, but the most relevant data is that which actually demonstrates the specimen is what it has been represented as. 

 

Lee


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#4 Astroman007

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Posted 14 October 2019 - 07:43 AM

No, you're not crazy. You are organized. smile.gif

 

Good on you!


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#5 Kyphoron

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Posted 14 October 2019 - 08:20 AM

The most important information to keep, if available, is the provenance. The record of where you acquired it, from whom, and where they got it and how they identified it as belonging to a particular fall. The specific data on a particular type can always be found, and is certainly important, but the most relevant data is that which actually demonstrates the specimen is what it has been represented as. 

 

Lee

Lee,

 

  I have all that along with COAs separately. I am just using this for quick reference. Since most COAs and other pertinent detail doesn't contain images, I decided to do this to keep better track of my ever growing collection. 95% of my collection is from IMCA members and those that were not I did research actually inquiring to certain institutions and people asking them if they have tested the material I was interested in.   


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#6 Kyphoron

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Posted 14 October 2019 - 08:35 AM

I'm not a meteorite collector, but it seems like if you don't keep track of all that information, you lose a lot fo the importance of the sample.  I would certainly want to know as much about it as possible.  

I am curious, though, how can you tell a meteorite when you find one?  How can you tell a meteorite from any other rock, if it isn't obviously melted?  This is an aspect f the hobby I have't partici[ated in, and now that I see one from Barnstable (not TOO far from me), I wonder if I would know one if I found it.

 

I am fairly new to meteorites but I can tell you that a ton of factors come into play when identifying a meteorite. To many to list here because of the different types of meteorites that one can encounter.  The Barnstable meteorite was laying on the ground under a pile of leaf litter. It looked like an ordinary rock except for one thing. It was oxidized which indicated some level of iron in it. But stumbling across it you would have sworn it was just a rock. Here is a picture of it laying in the leaf litter from the Meteoritical Bulletin website.

 

[Barnstable.jpg


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