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Lunar ISS transit

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#1 DubbelDerp

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Posted 14 October 2019 - 08:33 AM

Hello all,

 

This is by no means a masterpiece, but wanted to share an image I got of the ISS transiting the moon, taken from my back yard on 10/8/2019. This was shot through my 8" LX200, with focal reducer, and my Canon 600D. It was around 8 pm, so I wasn't able to get the mount aligned as the stars were not visible yet. I was manually guiding the scope through the viewfinder, with the camera taking continuous shots as the ISS approached the moon. I had to shoot JPG, since the buffer fills after 5-6 RAW shots, but the camera seems to handle JPG just fine continuously. Or at least for the 30 seconds or so I had it firing.

 

I took the 15 frames that showed the path of the ISS, aligned them in Nebulosity 4 with the automatic/non-stellar alignment process, then stacked them to show more detail on the moon. I then brought the aligned frames and the stack into GIMP and used layer masks to bring the individual shots of the ISS onto the stacked image. Full disclosure - I only captured two of the images of the ISS in the portion above and to the right of the moon. The frame was too narrow to capture more of the field. I artificially increased the canvas size and copied the four images of the ISS above and to the right of these. I think it makes a prettier picture, if not authentic. If this bothers you, please feel free to ignore the top of the image...

 

I haven't done much with stacking or compositing lunar images, so any suggestions for how I could do this better would be appreciated.

 

Thanks in advance!

 

ISS Transit Oct 8, 2019

 


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#2 pbealo

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Posted 14 October 2019 - 08:45 AM

Very nice. Two questions:

 

1) How do you forecast these events?

 

2) What d you see when you blow up one of the ISS images?

 

Peter B.



#3 DubbelDerp

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Posted 14 October 2019 - 09:08 AM

Thanks! This was a fun one to capture since it was a timed event.

 

For forecasting transits, I've been using this website:

https://transit-finder.com/

 

If you zoom in on one of the images of the ISS, it's highly overexposed but if you use a bit of imagination, it looks maybe a bit like the real thing. My LX200 is the older EMC model, so there's a good bit of CA on something this bright.

ISS_zoom.jpg


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#4 t_image

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Posted 14 October 2019 - 10:02 AM

Good going DubbelDerp!waytogo.gifyay.gif 

One doesn't see many lit ISS transits of the Moon captures (only Lunar type I've managed to capture)!

>a lit pass has the additional challenge of getting exposure correct. The trade-off of going jpg or capturing Hisres video doesn't afford exposure leeway like RAW images either....

I find it fun to capture the ISS outside of the disk as well,

as the shadow Solar and typical ISS Lunar in shadow transits don't afford such captures!

Thank you also for your transparency of which ones you cloned, good ethics!!!

Also crazy luck it was from your back yard! Most usually have to drive to a good spot.


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#5 DubbelDerp

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Posted 14 October 2019 - 11:44 AM

Thanks, t_image! I could have driven somewhere that would have been closer to the centerline of the transit, but this way I could have the kids out with me as spotters when the ISS was getting close. I thought it was a good compromise. One of the bigger challenges was finding a spot close enough to run an extension cord to power the camera off an adapter, but clear all the trees around my house. At the last moment, I still had to pick up the LX200 with the tripod and move it a bit to clear a tree.


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#6 mackiedlm

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Posted 17 October 2019 - 05:18 PM

Thanks, t_image! I could have driven somewhere that would have been closer to the centerline of the transit, but this way I could have the kids out with me as spotters when the ISS was getting close. I thought it was a good compromise. One of the bigger challenges was finding a spot close enough to run an extension cord to power the camera off an adapter, but clear all the trees around my house. At the last moment, I still had to pick up the LX200 with the tripod and move it a bit to clear a tree.

A cool image AND A night out for the kids! Nice one.




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