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Asteroid TA7-I think it missed us

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#1 Barlowbill

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Posted 14 October 2019 - 06:04 PM

At 6:53 pm ET, this space rock, 111-foot (whatever that means), allegedly pasted earth at 22,500 mph, at a distance of 935,000 miles, somewhere between Mars and Jupiter.  I went out and looked but of course, didn't see it.  I blame on the cirrus clouds.

Another one bites the dust.  Lucky us.


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#2 stevew

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Posted 14 October 2019 - 06:16 PM

It's inevitable that one day we will be hit by something large enough to disrupt our evolution.

It's just a matter of when...


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#3 RalphMeisterTigerMan

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Posted 14 October 2019 - 07:13 PM

I hate to rain on your parade, but 935,000 miles is only about 680,000 past the Moon. Even at the best favourable oppositions of Mars is about 35,000,000 miles from the Earth.

 

You may want to revue your Astronomical distances. Also, 935,000 miles is from a Near Miss or destroying "All life on Earth". Also 110 feet is approx. 33 metres, not even big enough to make the Barringer Meteor but big enough to ruin a lot of people's lives if it were to hit a large city.

 

Anyways, happy Thanksgiving (Canadian Thanksgiving).

 

Clear Skies.

RalphMeisterTigerMan


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#4 scadvice

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Posted 14 October 2019 - 07:22 PM

Like Stevew said. We are getting better at detecting them. The more time that goes by before one does hit us, the better chance technology will come up and have the capability of deflecting it. Size does matter here though. If it's really big then there better be a bunch of us living other than here on Earth.step.gif


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#5 t_image

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Posted 14 October 2019 - 11:30 PM

At 6:53 pm ET, this space rock, 111-foot (whatever that means), allegedly pasted earth at 22,500 mph, at a distance of 935,000 miles, somewhere between Mars and Jupiter.  I went out and looked but of course, didn't see it.  I blame on the cirrus clouds.

Another one bites the dust.  Lucky us.

Sorry, I missed how that was a noteworthy event?

Was it because you weren't able to spot it?

A PHA, both larger and with a closer pass whizzed by the Earth a day before,

and two PHA's (October 10,11) passed by Earth at more than1/2 that distance just a few days ago, both larger than TA7.

If you want to keep better track than some news story that reports space distances in miles?,

www.spaceweather.com is a good resource for Near Earth Objects.....


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#6 Astroman007

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Posted 15 October 2019 - 08:28 AM

OP: irrelevancy of this particular asteroid flyby aside, you think? Oh what a vote of confidence, oh what a qualified would-be protector of the human race!

And of course you won't see such a small asteroid at such a great distance with your naked eyes alone.

If this is a representative of those tasked with finding NEOs before it's too late...heaven help us all. The bumbling adventures of Dr. Clouseau begin.



#7 JoeInMN

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Posted 15 October 2019 - 03:36 PM

Here's a JPL Page with data about this object, and a 3D orbital diagram that you can zoom and move around for a visual sense of its relationship to Earth. Sure, it was a non-event as far as its chances of hitting us this time around, or of most of us actually observing it, is concerned. But the relevance of it is that it's a big enough rock to do a respectable amount of damage at least locally; on an astronomical scale it went by pretty danged close; and it's good to occasionally refresh our awareness that our planet is a moth continuously flitting through a hailstorm.


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