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Problem with Baader/Celestron Bino with OCS

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#1 De Lorme

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Posted 15 October 2019 - 09:29 PM

Hello, 

 

Thanks for answering my questions.  I received my Baader/Celestron binos today and upon checking them out I realized it wasn't threaded for filters.

So I threaded my 2" to 1.25" adapter onto 2" to 1.25" eyepiece holder{the one that goes into the diagonal}. Then I screwed the WO 2x ocs onto the adapter and inserted the 1.25" nose of the B/C bino into 2" to 1.25" diagonal eyepiece holder. Take a look at the pictures.  Since these binos have a 60 degree tilt I wouldn't need a diagonal and with the shortened length I would not need a ocs to enable me to do low power viewing with my 5" 7.5 refractor but with the possiblity for higher power on moon and planetes with either my WO 2x or Arcturus 3x ocs.

 

Expecting my wife's face to be significantly closer it was just the opposite, it was further away with a greater field of view like it was a focal reducer instead of a 2x ocs.

 

Took off the 2x and her face field the view and nothing else .  I wasn't using any eyepiece while doing this just looking into the bino. 

 

Anybody have an explanation as to why this is so and how I can increase the magnification.

 

Thanks for the help,

 

Clear Skies,

 

De Lorme

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#2 Eddgie

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Posted 16 October 2019 - 07:27 AM

Use it on the moon, not on your wife's face.


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#3 De Lorme

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Posted 16 October 2019 - 09:24 AM

lol



#4 junomike

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Posted 16 October 2019 - 04:52 PM

Barlows act like Reducers when looking into just them alone.

Place a Lens or mirror into the optical path and things reverse.



#5 De Lorme

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Posted 17 October 2019 - 12:53 AM

Thanks Mike,

 

I just didn't realize . Was quite surprised{LOL}. Learn something new today. LOl

 

Clear Skies,

 

De Lorme



#6 rob.0919

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Posted 17 October 2019 - 02:16 PM

Use it on the moon, not on your wife's face.

lol.gif



#7 Eddgie

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Posted 17 October 2019 - 02:52 PM

lol.gif

Well, what I said was probably funny, but it was not meant to be funny in itself.

 

It was meant to say that using a Barlow to look at someone in the room is not the same as using a Barlow in a telescope in front of an eyepiece to look at something in the sky.

 

It was hard to say it without sounding funny though it it looked funny when I wrote it, but the message was in fact meant pragmatically. 



#8 De Lorme

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Posted 18 October 2019 - 03:53 AM

Still very funny! LOL

 

Looked at some open cluster tonight{M29,39}and while the stars were very sharp the veiw was a little restrictive.  I had read elsewhere that these are best used for the planets and the moon.  Wasn't using a diagonal or a ocs to come to focus either. Stars were really sharp with my Meade{Japan}zooms.  Hoping the quality of the prism and the alignment of the prism housings will allow me to push the power close to 300x on the moon.  When inserting the zooms the tolerances were very tight and the set screw which held the zooms was machined very well. Neither my wife or I had any problems merging.   Since I had made a pier extender for my AVX looking at zenith was a little difficult but not impossible.  

 

Looking forward to the moon.

 

Clear Skies,  De Lorme



#9 Eddgie

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Posted 18 October 2019 - 10:32 AM

Still very funny! LOL

 

Looked at some open cluster tonight{M29,39}and while the stars were very sharp the veiw was a little restrictive.  I had read elsewhere that these are best used for the planets and the moon.  Wasn't using a diagonal or a ocs to come to focus either. Stars were really sharp with my Meade{Japan}zooms.  Hoping the quality of the prism and the alignment of the prism housings will allow me to push the power close to 300x on the moon.  When inserting the zooms the tolerances were very tight and the set screw which held the zooms was machined very well. Neither my wife or I had any problems merging.   Since I had made a pier extender for my AVX looking at zenith was a little difficult but not impossible.  

 

Looking forward to the moon.

 

Clear Skies,  De Lorme

I would say that they are not "best on the planets and moon" but rather I would say that they are the best way to view the planets and the moon (and the sun).

 

Obviously you won't get the same wide field with a Binoviewer as you would be able to get with a single eyepiece, but that does not mean that they can't be quite amazing on other subjects.  If the scope can reach focus at 1x and you have a binoviewer with big prisms and can use wide field eyepieces, you can still get very pleasing views.  Obviously the key is to use faster telescopes and big prism BVs. 

 

Last night I was out with my new to me AP 106LE (which is f/6.5) and even with a small prism BV (which does reach focus at native focal length) and a pair of 20mm Plossls, I was still able to easily frame the Double Cluster and a very large area around it.

 

So, the trick for wide field views is to be able to reach focus at native focal length, use a T2 diagonal with direct connection, and a fast telescope.  (And of course the scope can't be too fast or you loose aperture. Most BVs will go down to f/4.7) as long as the diagonal and light path support it). 


Edited by Eddgie, 18 October 2019 - 10:35 AM.


#10 De Lorme

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Posted 18 October 2019 - 03:06 PM

The double is really cool to look at.  Will look at it tonight. Won't be able fit it into the whole field of view with my 5' being a 7.5 FR but it still will be a lot of fun.

 

Clear Skies,

 

De Lorme




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