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Vaughan crater - New name to the lunar nomenclature

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#1 John_Moore

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Posted 16 October 2019 - 03:41 PM

The IAU has given the name 'Vaughan' to a relatively small-sized (3.0 km in diameter) crater on the Farside (Lat 41.41S, Long 171.85W).

 

Up close (below), it shows some nice details: a very crumbly-looking floor (with some impact-melt cracks seen on the western floor sector); ejecta boulders and debris around its outer rim; along with bright rayed material that extends for some several kilometres splayed almost in every direction from it central impact point. All the signs of a young-ish crater (use this link to zoom in and out).

 

John Moore

 

Vaughan

Edited by John_Moore, 16 October 2019 - 03:42 PM.

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#2 highfnum

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Posted 17 October 2019 - 04:31 AM

nice example of slumping 



#3 John_Moore

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Posted 17 October 2019 - 06:00 AM

Below, a view looking westwards.

 

Though, shadow effects (and bright parts) can sometimes mislead to features seen in a crater, it still looks like the whole north-western wall sector is covered in impact melt. In effect, as the crater developed during seconds of impact, melt of the surface material, created by the enormous temperatures generated, might have had a preferred direction; hint, perhaps, of the direction in which the impactor initially came from (that is, from the southeast).

 

Bottom image: Sometimes, the shadowed regional walls can display details lost. The effect, essentially, is due to reflected light from those walls in light on to the dark shadowed walls of the crater (think Earthshine on to the Moon).

 

John Moore

 

VaunhanWesternWall
 
Vaughan LightFromDark
 
 

 


Edited by John_Moore, 17 October 2019 - 08:25 PM.

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#4 BeltofOrion

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Posted 18 October 2019 - 10:54 AM

Interesting post, John.  I found the last image to be particularly intriguing. I made a copy and opened it up in the Nik Collection plugin for PhotoShop and looked at those shadows in some of the presets and Viveza2.  Pushing the Structure slider to the right opens up the shadows a little more. Can't do it too much before it starts to look rather blocky from pixelization,  but as long as you look at it in a small version and don't zoom in too far it's facinating what hides in shadows. smile.gif



#5 John_Moore

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Posted 18 October 2019 - 11:58 AM

Many thanks, BeltofOrion.

 

In my own limited software, I tried pushing the 'Contrast', 'Shadow' buttons (not Photoshop) to suit limits above normal, but any further, as you experienced, became blocky.

 

John Moore




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