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Inexpensive camera?

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#1 Hugh Peck

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Posted 18 October 2019 - 12:55 PM

Any suggestions on an inexpensive camera for microscopes? It would be nice to take a pictures. Don't need really high quality just something reliable and easy to use.

 

 



#2 petert913

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Posted 18 October 2019 - 01:12 PM

Not sure the diameter of microscope eyepieces.  I don't think they are standard 1.25" telescope size.

 

In any event, this may do the trick:   https://tinyurl.com/y3w4ay4f

 

It requires a computer to capture, so, not a direct-to-film type camera


Edited by petert913, 18 October 2019 - 01:15 PM.

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#3 photoracer18

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Posted 18 October 2019 - 01:46 PM

Microscope eyepieces are .917".


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#4 Hugh Peck

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Posted 18 October 2019 - 01:49 PM

That's the kind of thing. Thanks.

 

Yes, just something I can plug into the computer. The standard is 23 mm. The adapters say 23.2-30 and 23.2-35. Unfortunately, knowing nothing about microscopes I'm not sure what that means.

 

Hey, Photoracer, Thank you, I had just searched that. Do you know what the numbers on the adapters stand for?



#5 PatrickVt

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Posted 18 October 2019 - 01:59 PM

I use the Celestron HD Digital Microscope Imager 5mp camera made specifically for microscopes.  It gets the job done.  The software is a little quirky but it works.

 

Patrick

 

EDIT:  Or, alternatively, you can purchase a 23mm microscope nosepiece for your T-ring for your usual mirrorless/dslr camera.  The problem with this route is that you will get significant vignetting using APS-C or full frame sensors.  Because of the small diameter of microscope eyepieces, smaller sensors are preferred to avoid vignetting.

 

 

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Edited by PatrickVt, 18 October 2019 - 02:04 PM.

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#6 Hugh Peck

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Posted 18 October 2019 - 02:20 PM

Thanks. Cool pics! I think I'll avoid the adapter and get something actually designed for microscopes. My experience tells me if I hooked a T6 to it it'd end up unbalanced and tumble on to the floor. bangbang.gif 


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#7 PatrickVt

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Posted 18 October 2019 - 03:47 PM

I agree...  I don't like putting all the weight of my dslr or mirrorless camera on top of the microscope either.  

 

The Celestron Microsoft Imager simply replaces the eyepiece.  It is the same size as the eyepiece so you just slip it into where the eyepiece goes.  It is easy to connect to the microscope.

 

Patrick  : ) 
 


Edited by PatrickVt, 18 October 2019 - 04:22 PM.

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#8 Hugh Peck

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Posted 18 October 2019 - 04:18 PM

I like simple and easy. smile.png Particularly when just starting out. My second scope was a Celestron Polaris C-6 and no astronomy club or anyone around to show me how to use an equatorial mount. The internet existed but most people didn't have a computer. In any case, modems were 1200 bps. Took me a while to figure it out getting the occasional hint from Astronomy and S&T. I'd rather not take as long with a microscope. grin.gif 


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#9 PatrickVt

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Posted 18 October 2019 - 10:06 PM

I went digging for a photo of the camera mounted on the microscope...  I didn't feel like pulling out the microscope and accessories to shoot a new photo to show the camera mounted on the microscope...  and I found a decent photo showing the Celestron Imager on my microscope sticking out on top of the trinocular connection.  My scope is a trinocular scope so I have the camera in the third ocular which allows me to still use the binocular eyepieces for visual.  That trinocular is the same size as the binocular eyepieces...  23mm.  And, the camera is 23mm.  It is an easy fit.  It would work the same with a binocular or single ocular microscope but you would lose the ability to visually view through the eyepiece that you replaced with the camera.  

 

Also, Celestron makes a less expensive imager too...  I think it is a 2mp one.  If I remember correctly, the 5mp one is around $80 and the 2mp one is only a little bit less expensive (if they are still available).  I opted for the higher resolution imager and don't have any complaints.  It works as advertised.

 

One other thing worth noting...  some microscopes use 30mm eyepieces rather than 23mm.  I think this camera came with the necessary adapters for various types of connections.

 

Patrick

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#10 Hugh Peck

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Posted 18 October 2019 - 11:14 PM

Thank you. As long as I can see the image on the computer it's okay. I can live with 2mp. It's just so I can get a picture of what I've seen mostly. That and it will make it easier to see, of course, but mostly to capture a few shots. Right now I'm just looking for something to get started. I'm working on just trying to see one thing every day or two. Iodized salt was the first thing, and that I would like to get a picture of, and today it was sugar. I should try Splenda since I tried the sugar. I'd like to get 1 good shot of each thing I observe.


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#11 Hugh Peck

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Posted 19 October 2019 - 10:00 AM

Ordered the 2mp version as I don't need fancy or expensive at this point. That and the 5mp is backordered. grin.gif Looked at some other brands but they tend to get really pricey really quickly. Not a scientist or a lab worker. 


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