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T-Lyrae Carbon Star - dim!

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#1 fcathell

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Posted 19 October 2019 - 11:34 PM

I dusted off my old Celestron GT mount, clamped on the C5 and entered the coordinates for T-Lyrae, the carbon star near Vega. I was shocked at how dim it looks compared to the same time last year.  I checked my notes from last year in October and it was significantly brighter and easier to locate. I would venture to say that I would have never found it without the goto mount this time. I know it is a variable star but would anyone know off hand if it is at its minimum?

 

Frank

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#2 NorthernlatAK

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Posted 19 October 2019 - 11:39 PM

That's one of my favorite new targets when I can get a clear sky, which it hasn't been. Is it a deeper red as well? Cant wait for a clear night...
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#3 DHEB

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Posted 20 October 2019 - 04:08 AM

I dusted off my old Celestron GT mount, clamped on the C5 and entered the coordinates for T-Lyrae, the carbon star near Vega. I was shocked at how dim it looks compared to the same time last year.  I checked my notes from last year in October and it was significantly brighter and easier to locate. I would venture to say that I would have never found it without the goto mount this time. I know it is a variable star but would anyone know off hand if it is at its minimum?

 

Frank

Tucson

The best thing you can do to check out these kind of things is to go plot a light curve using AAVSO:s Light Curve Generator.

 

T Lyr is very irregular and in addition to that, being so red, gets often disparate estimates.

Lyr-T.png

 

With caveat for the large spread in observations one may possibly agree that it was appreciably brighter in October last year.


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#4 fcathell

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Posted 20 October 2019 - 10:39 AM

Last year I was able to catch it with an eyepiece that yielded 60X with a little sweeping, no problem.  I had to go to 100X before I noticed it while slightly sweeping the field with the slew controls. It was so dim my eye failed to catch the red color at 60X. I can't say it appeared any redder because of the lower magnitude. At 160X it showed a nice deep red airy disk. Last year I was using a 127 Mak while this year I was using a C5. This shouldn't have had any significant impact on the visual interpretation. DHEB - thanks for the plot - this star is all over the place. 

 

Frank

Tucson


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#5 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 20 October 2019 - 01:55 PM

There's some data on T Lyrae at https://www.universe...com/star/tlyrae and http://stars.astro.i...u/sow/tlyr.html



#6 chrysalis

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Posted 21 October 2019 - 04:30 AM

T Lyrae Color Index: 5.47

R Leporis Color Index: 5.74




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