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going unfiltered?

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#1 GOLGO13

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Posted 20 October 2019 - 09:26 PM

I've kind of forgot to try unfiltered using the night vision. It seemed to do well on globular clusters. Are there any situations or objects you like to go unfiltered?



#2 Mazerski

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Posted 20 October 2019 - 11:09 PM

Tried a few times in various modes... east coast mid-Atlantic light pollution is too great which allows too much light in device. I stopped using the 610IR but discovered that in scope at f7 and f10 on globs and open clusters it does well but more testing is needed.



#3 Eddgie

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Posted 21 October 2019 - 01:08 PM

I've kind of forgot to try unfiltered using the night vision. It seemed to do well on globular clusters. Are there any situations or objects you like to go unfiltered?

For stars and often for galaxies, no filter can indeed produce better views than a filter, depending on light pollution. 

 

For fast achromats, a filter is almost essential because without it, the unfocused energy would make stars bloated messes. This means that for stellar targets, the filter is always required for this kind of scope. 

 

SCTs Suffer a lot from filters, so the goal with them is to find the least aggressive filter possible for the best limiting magnitude, which might not be the most aggressive filter. 

 

So yes, under less than urban or semi-urban skies, no filter is almost always better especially in an SCT, where the very poor system transmisson in red is at a big penalty imaging reflectors or imaging Apos, which generally have much better near IR transmission and don't depend as much on the 450nm to 650nm end of the spectrum.

 

Bottom line, try everything.  A blacker background does not mean that the filter is better.  Limiting magnitude is the better test.  




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