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Coathanger

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#1 JIMZ7

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Posted 21 October 2019 - 02:09 PM

I just like to scan the skies in small short tube refractors while sitting down. Aging eyes and light pollution play a big part of my 3rd magnitude world as I see it. In my Orion ST-90 with a University Optics 24mm Konig it gives me 21x at 2.88 degrees fov. Last night I scanned over to the "Coathanger". Always a very nice asterism in any scope at very low powers. There are 10 bright stars along with dimmer stars that make it a fun object. I have observed it with a Orion ST-80 and 17mm Sirius plossl at 23.5x and years ago with a Orion 100mm f/6 refractor at 22x with a 27mm flat field. All beautiful.... in their own ways.

 

Jim

 

 

 

 


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#2 ArizonaScott

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Posted 21 October 2019 - 02:14 PM

I agree, CR399 is a very nice sight in a rich-field refractor, really nice in my ST80 or 20x80's! 


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#3 JIMZ7

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Posted 21 October 2019 - 02:51 PM

It's also called Brocchi's Cluster. I never looked at it in Binoculars. I wonder in my 8x42mm & 10x50mm what I might see. I've read it's a naked eye object in dark skies.

Jim

 


Edited by JIMZ7, 21 October 2019 - 03:00 PM.

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#4 Spartinix

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Posted 21 October 2019 - 03:40 PM

I can see it naked eye but I prefer observing it with my 6" F5 @ 19x. I think it might be best at low power with 4-5" though.

#5 VariableBob

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Posted 21 October 2019 - 04:03 PM

I have a 102 mm dhort focal length refractor which yields a field slightly larger than 3 deg.  It is a very nice sight in this telescope and it is equally nice in the 60 mm finder scope on my Dob.  It is one of my favorite targets for star parties.


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#6 Ken Watts

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Posted 21 October 2019 - 07:11 PM

Every time I see the coathanger I am reminded of the first time I saw it while looking at comet West in the mid 1970's.  Always good to see a good old friend!

 

Clear and steady skies,

 

Ken W


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#7 chrysalis

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Posted 22 October 2019 - 01:12 PM

Just to mention there is also a rectangular NGC open cluster just off one side - I can never remember which side or the number


Edited by chrysalis, 22 October 2019 - 01:13 PM.


#8 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 22 October 2019 - 02:32 PM

Information on Collinder 399 can be found at these URLs:

http://astrobob.area...ned-from-stars/

http://www.messier.s...gc/brocchi.html

https://www.astronom...r-collender-399
 

https://apod.nasa.go...d/ap150826.html


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#9 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 22 October 2019 - 02:40 PM

Just to mention there is also a rectangular NGC open cluster just off one side - I can never remember which side or the number

That would be NGC 6802.  This somewhat faint open cluster lies to the east of Cr 399.

 

http://www.kopernik....chive/n6802.htm

 

https://apod.nasa.go...d/ap081223.html


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#10 chrysalis

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Posted 22 October 2019 - 03:06 PM

That would be NGC 6802.  This somewhat faint open cluster lies to the east of Cr 399.

 

http://www.kopernik....chive/n6802.htm

 

https://apod.nasa.go...d/ap081223.html

Thanks Dave. I was writing from the waiting room at the eye doctor's, where I had an emergency appointment for "ocular migraine". Anyhow- - - this cluster is very attractive in dark skies in my 12" at 107X.


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#11 Tony Flanders

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Posted 22 October 2019 - 07:41 PM

The Coathanger is an obvious bright smudge to the unaided eye even under good suburban skies -- comparable to the Double Cluster or M31. But I've never been able to resolve it into individual stars without optical aid.

 

Even the smallest binoculars show the asterism beautifully. My wife "discovered" it one night while perusing the sky at random with my 10x50s.


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#12 StanH

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Posted 22 October 2019 - 07:51 PM

This past weekend at the nature center near my home, Collinder 399 was visible unaided as a tiny bar.  Through the 8x50mm finder it is awesome.  Used to be one of my favorite objects years ago as it could readily seen unaided from my home, but no so much anymore.

 

About a week ago from my home NGC 6802 only appeared as a tiny, rounded bar-shaped ghostly glow with no resolution at 61x with the 17.5-inch.  It took higher magnification to see the faint stars.  Not impressive.  From the darker site at the nature center it was well resolved at the same magnification.  At higher magnification it appeared to be completely resolved and really a pretty cluster.  It is amazing how a journey of just a few miles can make such a difference.

 

Tonight, I'm hoping to get out in my yard for an hour or two, but have to wait on lights from a nearby soccer field to turn off.


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#13 Illinois

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Posted 24 October 2019 - 06:40 AM

I saw coathanger cluster in my 10x50 binocular when I grew up in light pollution Chicago. Its beautiful but much better and more fainter stars in dark sky and low wild field telescope around 20 power.


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#14 kfiscus

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Posted 25 October 2019 - 10:20 PM

Regarding the Coathanger and its companion NGC 6802- they are a fantastic pair showing depth of field.  I'm a sucker for mixed pairs of objects in the same FOV.  6802 is just off the right hand end of the Hanger as it would be oriented on a closet rod.


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#15 chrysalis

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Posted 26 October 2019 - 04:12 AM

Regarding the Coathanger and its companion NGC 6802- they are a fantastic pair showing depth of field.  I'm a sucker for mixed pairs of objects in the same FOV.  6802 is just off the right hand end of the Hanger as it would be oriented on a closet rod.

Well, in that case :) :

 

https://www.cloudyni...tomous-objects/



#16 jaraxx

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Posted 26 October 2019 - 04:31 PM

It's also called Brocchi's Cluster. I never looked at it in Binoculars. I wonder in my 8x42mm & 10x50mm what I might see. I've read it's a naked eye object in dark skies.

Jim

You'll see the Coathanger, and it will look very good.



#17 jayrome

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Posted 30 October 2019 - 08:17 AM

Also checked out the Coathanger Monday night. This is one of those clusters that you appreciate more through binoculars.

And yes from dark skies you can see it easily with the naked eye.



#18 jcj380

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Posted 22 November 2019 - 09:36 AM

The Coathanger is an obvious bright smudge to the unaided eye even under good suburban skies -- comparable to the Double Cluster or M31. But I've never been able to resolve it into individual stars without optical aid.

 

Even the smallest binoculars show the asterism beautifully. My wife "discovered" it one night while perusing the sky at random with my 10x50s.

I was randomly scanning around one night with binos and "discovered" it also. 



#19 WyattDavis

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Posted 23 November 2019 - 06:55 AM

Well, in that case smile.gif :

 

https://www.cloudyni...tomous-objects/

Cool link. I like DSO pairs, too!


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#20 Frisky

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Posted 24 November 2019 - 03:46 PM

I view the Coathanger, nightly, through 8X42 binoculars but never noticed the fairly faint NGC6802. With my telescope, I can get the entire cluster in the FOV using my 32mm, 60 degree eyepiece. I can get all but one star on the hanger bar in the FOV with my 25mm HD-60. I'll swing over, with the 25mm, and take a look at NGC6802 the next clear night. 

 

Joe




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