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MAPS, CHARTS, BOOKS, WHICH ONES DO YOU USE?

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#1 Dakota1

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Posted 01 November 2019 - 08:16 PM

When you are out observing what are your most used maps, charts etc do you have with you when you are at your observing
site? What are your most used? Are there any materials designed especially for binoculars? Any feed back greatly appreciated

Thanks Bill

#2 harbinjer

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Posted 01 November 2019 - 10:27 PM

I really like my Pocket sky atlas. There are books, like Binocular Astronomy by Crossen, and Binocular Highlights by Seronik, and Touring the Universe through Binoculars by Harrington, another Binocular Astronomy by Tonkin. Also beginner books like Turn Left at Orion or Nightwatch by Dickinson that have plenty of binocular targets. 


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#3 bumm

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Posted 01 November 2019 - 10:48 PM

For just about every observing session aside from simply stepping out at night to say hello to the constellations, whether with binoculars or telescope, I use either the Jumbo Pocket Sky Atlas or the old Skalnate Pleso Atlas, and then the Uranometria 2000.  I also almost always check what will be up with a planisphere.

     I have many other atlases, some for specific uses, some for when the usual ones just don't seem to pan out quite right.  Some are better for dark nebulae, some are better for star names, etc, but I could usually do well with one of those first two and then the Uranometria 2000.

                                                                                                            Marty


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#4 Unknownastron

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Posted 02 November 2019 - 01:55 AM

For binocular observing my favorite charts are The Bright Star Atlas, Pocket Sky Atlas and the (free) magnitude 7 atlas.

Phil Harrington's book is my favorite but others already mentioned are good as well.  For the last couple of years I have been using Sky Safari on a tablet.

You want a good atlas but not one with so much detail that you get lost.  You don't want lots and lots of objects and stars that are too dim to see in your binoculars.

Clear skies and clean glass,

Mike


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#5 Corcaroli78

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Posted 02 November 2019 - 08:54 AM

I really like my Pocket sky atlas. There are books, like Binocular Astronomy by Crossen, and Binocular Highlights by Seronik, and Touring the Universe through Binoculars by Harrington, another Binocular Astronomy by Tonkin. Also beginner books like Turn Left at Orion or Nightwatch by Dickinson that have plenty of binocular targets. 

I use almost the same setup: 

 

1. 1st ed. Binocular astronomy (Crossen-Tirion) to understand the background of what i will observe. Its my main and favorite Binocular book

2. Binocular Highlights (Seronik) for quick tours and sharing the views with other people

3. Discover the Night sky through binoculars (Tonkin) including his wonderful website with sketches of what we can expect in different apertures. highly recommendable:

 

http://binocularsky....bject_query.php

 

4. Pocket sky atlas as the main chart resource  

5. Fernglaser (Lambert Sphinx) for the binocular technical part

6. Skysafari

 

Clear skies!

Carlos


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#6 BRCoz

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Posted 02 November 2019 - 12:07 PM

Pocket sky atlas

Skysafari


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#7 Mr. Bill

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Posted 02 November 2019 - 03:35 PM

SkyAtlas 2000 for casual reference 

 

interstellarum Deep Sky Atlas for detail of more obscure DSOs

 

Occasionally Uranometria 2000



#8 vkhastro1

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Posted 02 November 2019 - 03:58 PM

My favourite for deepsky binocular observing is the Oculum (publisher) Deep Sky Reiseatlas !

Laminated spiral bound charts with a bonus of a projected Telrad (both 2° and 4°) on the highlighted deepsky objects.

Information on each object is listed on the opposite page.

It is also great for small to medium telescope.


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#9 JimV

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Posted 03 November 2019 - 11:44 AM

NightWatch by Terence Dickinson has easy charts for bright objects with commentary of distance and magnitude.

A lot like the old Edmund Scientific Mag 6 star atlas.

Easy to find at used bookstores.


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#10 Stellarfire

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Posted 08 June 2021 - 12:41 PM

In German:

- Deep Sky Reiseatlas (Michael Feiler & Philip Noack, Oculum, 4th ed. 2014), with matching
- Deep Sky Reiseführer (Ronald Stoyan, Oculum, 5th ed. 2014).
- Der Moonhopper – 20 Mondtouren für Hobby-Astronomen (Lambert Spix & Frank Gasparini, Oculum, 2011).
- Reiseatlas Mond. (Ronald Stoyan & Hans-Georg Purucker, Oculum, 1st ed. 2013).
- Interstellarum Deep Sky Atlas (both, Premium and Normalausgabe), (Ronald Stoyan & Stephan Schurig, Oculum, 1st ed. 2013).

 

In English:
- Binocular Highlights - 99 Celestial Sights for Binocular Users (Gary Seronik, S&T 2010).
- Celestial Sampler – 60 Small-Scope Tours for Starlit Nights (Sue French, S&T 4th ed. 2008).
- The Casual Sky Observer's Guide Stargazing with Binoculars and Small Telescopes (Rony de Laet, Springer 1st ed. 2012).
- Turn Left at Orion (Guy Consolmagno & Dan M. Davis, Cambridge, 4th ed. 2011).
- Cosmic Challenge (Philip S. Harrington, Cambridge, 1st ed. 2011).

- Sky Vistas – Astronomy for Binoculars and Richest-Field Telescopes (Craig Crossen & Gerald Rhemann, Springer, 1st ed. 2004).

 

 

From the above titles most used under the sky:

For quick looks: Oculum's very handy spiral-bound Deep Sky Reiseatlas (fairly weather-proof).

If I need deeper coverage: Interstellarum Deep Sky Atlas Premium (fully weather proof).

 

Esteban


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#11 Fiske

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Posted 09 June 2021 - 09:19 PM

In the field:

 

Sky Atlas 2000 black laminated field edition

Sky Atlas 2000 Companion

Uranometria 2000

Sissy Haas Double Stars for Small Telescopes

 

For research and planning my astronomy collection includes many books like the Night Sky Observer's Guide volumes 1 and 2 (prized and usually in the field), Burnham's Celestial Handbook, the O'Meara Deep Sky Companions series (excepting the Herschel 400 volume), Deep-Sky Wonders by Walter Scott Houston, Philip Harrington's Touring the Universe Through Binoculars, Binocular Astronomy by Crossen an Tirion, both of O'Meara's binocular guides, Sue French's Deep Sky Wonders, Archinal & Hynes Star Clusters, Chet Raymo's 365 Starry Nights, Fred Schaaf's A Year of the Stars, Mark Bratton's The Complete Guide to the Herschel objects. A number of books were donated to the Astronomical Society of Kansas City before I moved a few years ago. I haven't counted them since but but would guess my personal collection still includes 100-150 books.

 

Fiske



#12 gwlee

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Posted 10 June 2021 - 12:05 AM

S&T Pocket sky atlas
Skysafari plus

 


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#13 MrZoomZoom2017

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Posted 10 June 2021 - 12:32 AM

S&T Pocket Sky Atlas (both sizes) - keep the Jumbo version handy for frequent usage

Interstellarum Deep Sky Atlas Premium

Sky Atlas 2000 (1st & 2nd editions)

Nearby Galaxies Atlas

Peterson Field Guide to Stars and Planets

Burnham's Celestial Handbooks

 

Stellarium Mobile+ for my Samsung Tablet

 

Cheers,

Tim


Edited by MrZoomZoom2017, 10 June 2021 - 12:35 AM.


#14 sonny.barile

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Posted 10 June 2021 - 09:07 PM

I have Skysafari plus on my I-Pad and will occasionally bring that out if I’m using my 100 in the yard on a tripod. If I’m hand holding my 8x42 I don’t really bring anything with me.

Since I obtained Skysafari I have let my reference books collect dust. I know....shame on me.


Edited by sonny.barile, 10 June 2021 - 09:10 PM.

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#15 Crusty99

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Posted 11 June 2021 - 12:58 AM

Skalnate Pleso Atlas -- a nice atlas!

 

 



#16 Bob4BVM

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Posted 11 June 2021 - 01:01 AM

At night-SkyAtlas 2000 white edition & Field edition (black)

Session planning: SA2000 and Pretty Deep Maps for complete source down to Mag22.  I often plot objects of interest from PDM to white edition of SA2000 which is my session planning atlas. Those two make a great complimentary pair.

I have it all on paper when i head out, no PCs at the scope or binocs for me !

CS

Bob



#17 Alex65

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Posted 11 June 2021 - 05:38 AM

I tend to use my The Photographic Atlas of the Stars (Arnold, Doherty & Moore, 1999 edition) when planning star gazing sessions using my binoculars. The photographic images show stars down to about 8th magnitude. I usually use the colored photographs to plan ahead and ID suitable targets while the negative images are suitable for reference once outdoors and are readily visible under a red light.

 

IMG_0161 (800x449) (640x359).jpg

 

IMG_0162 (800x334).jpg


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#18 Fiske

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Posted 11 June 2021 - 09:13 AM

At night-SkyAtlas 2000 white edition & Field edition (black)

Session planning: SA2000 and Pretty Deep Maps for complete source down to Mag22.  I often plot objects of interest from PDM to white edition of SA2000 which is my session planning atlas. Those two make a great complimentary pair.

I have it all on paper when i head out, no PCs at the scope or binocs for me !

CS

Bob

No binocs????

 

Has anyone reported this post to the bino forum moderators?

 

lol.gif lol.gif lol.gif

 

get-em.gif


Edited by Fiske, 11 June 2021 - 09:22 AM.

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#19 Bob4BVM

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Posted 11 June 2021 - 12:18 PM

No binocs????

 

Has anyone reported this post to the bino forum moderators?

 

lol.gif lol.gif lol.gif

 

get-em.gif

Well, not exactly what i meant but i could see how you read it that way smile.gif

"I have it all on paper when i head out, no PCs at the scope or binocs for me !"

 

What i meant was : 

I have it all on paper when i head out, no stinking blinking computer for me when i'm out with the scope or binocs...

CS

Bob


Edited by Bob4BVM, 11 June 2021 - 12:19 PM.

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#20 Fiske

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Posted 11 June 2021 - 12:52 PM

Oh! So you don't use the stinking blinking computer with telescopes or with binocs. 

 

I'm down with that.

 

waytogo.gif waytogo.gif waytogo.gif



#21 Crusty99

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Posted 11 June 2021 - 01:03 PM

I tend to use my The Photographic Atlas of the Stars (Arnold, Doherty & Moore, 1999 edition) when planning star gazing sessions using my binoculars. The photographic images show stars down to about 8th magnitude. I usually use the colored photographs to plan ahead and ID suitable targets while the negative images are suitable for reference once outdoors and are readily visible under a red light.

 

attachicon.gifIMG_0161 (800x449) (640x359).jpg

 

attachicon.gifIMG_0162 (800x334).jpg

Another nice atlas to use with binoculars. waytogo.gif


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#22 Crusty99

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Posted 11 June 2021 - 01:12 PM

A nice planisphere can also be helpful with binocular observing. I like the Guide to the Stars. Others are also nice.

 

smile.gif



#23 MrZoomZoom2017

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Posted 11 June 2021 - 01:57 PM

Oh yeah - how could I forget about (blush.gif) "The Evening Sky Map":  http://skymaps.com/downloads.html

 

Cheers,

Tim



#24 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 11 June 2021 - 03:45 PM

I have Skysafari plus on my I-Pad and will occasionally bring that out if I’m using my 100 in the yard on a tripod. If I’m hand holding my 8x42 I don’t really bring anything with me.

Since I obtained Skysafari I have let my reference books collect dust. I know....shame on me.

 

I have a number of books but for observing with a telescope I use Sky Safari Pro along with tidbits acquired in the Cloudy Nights observing forums.

 

For Binos, I generally rely on experience.. 

 

Jon


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#25 Fiske

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Posted 11 June 2021 - 03:59 PM

Photo Star Atlases
 
The atlas on the right is the US edition of the Doherty/Moore book (published by Kalmbach Books).

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