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? about protoza ranching.

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#1 Hugh Peck

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Posted 02 November 2019 - 12:49 PM

Besides needing a "pygmy pony", any suggestions? I've read they should last a couple weeks but I don't seem to have any today after a bazillion yesterday. Normal? Was I the victim of protozoa rustlers? Have used yeast and a few rice grains. 



#2 Astroman007

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Posted 02 November 2019 - 01:09 PM

Hmmm... smiley-char145.gif


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#3 Hugh Peck

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Posted 02 November 2019 - 01:12 PM

Hmmm... smiley-char145.gif

That's what I thought. grin.gif 


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#4 db2005

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Posted 20 January 2020 - 07:54 AM

I'm guessing the water is contaminated by the waste products generated by the protozoa and bacteria. When this happens I replace some of the water with fresh water, this usually quickly restores life in the petri dish.



#5 Jim4321

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Posted 20 January 2020 - 08:33 AM

I only use pond water, rain water, or distilled water, never tap (chlorinated) water.

 

Jim H.



#6 Hugh Peck

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Posted 20 January 2020 - 08:53 AM

I did add new water but it didn't help. Pond water really isn't available at this time of year. I've used filtered water and distilled water as well as tap water with no difference in growth between them. Sometimes I've had no growth at all. 



#7 Microscopy

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Posted 21 January 2020 - 09:48 AM

It's difficult to try to answer such a question when the question is lacking basic information: what critters, how were they reared, etc...

 

I described my method to always have some critters at hand here: https://www.cloudyni...-comming-again/



#8 Hugh Peck

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Posted 21 January 2020 - 11:43 AM

They're adopted. From places like Nasco or Home Science Tools. Sometimes things grow, sometimes nothing. Some say used distilled or filtered water and some say use tap. I follow the destructions including, where stated, having water set aside in a separate container to add to the growth dish instead of "fresh" water and it makes no difference. When they do grow they're all gone within a few days. Rustlers. Or Aliens. 

 

From reading on the interwebs this seems to be normal for "protozoa kits" offered for sale. Some have good success and others nothing. 

 

If I had a tray of water outside it would be ice with a foot or more of snow on top.



#9 Jim4321

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Posted 21 January 2020 - 12:05 PM

I've found that a square inch or two of backyard moss soaked in distilled water (tap water may work?) for a half-hour will usually yield a variety of micro-critters.  It may work even better after a rainfall.  A ~3" covered petri dish works well for soaking.

 

Jim H.



#10 Hugh Peck

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Posted 21 January 2020 - 12:28 PM

I'll be trying something different once spring arrives around May. Through buying kits that only work half the time. There are plenty of ditches and drainage ponds in the area. They get rather annoyed if you remove water from a river or lake due to invasive species.  There's a of of ground moss around here. Thought about using "grass" (weed) clippings as well. Plus, I have some commercial prepared slides.

 

I did get a 5x ep which brings the microscope down to 20x for looking at coins, currency, stamps and other inanimate objects so it's still getting use. I need a clamp with heavy base to hold my LED flashlight I use to light up the usual subjects. 



#11 Microscopy

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Posted 21 January 2020 - 05:38 PM

Try a classic hay infusion, inoculated with a few drops of pond water. 


Edited by Microscopy, 21 January 2020 - 05:39 PM.


#12 db2005

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Posted 22 January 2020 - 01:19 AM

My bird bath is a very reliable source of water critters such as paramecia, rotifers, vorticellas and even a few tardigrades. If you have access to a bird bath (or if you can set up one close to where you live and keep it replenished with water) you will soon have a constant source of critters.



#13 Hugh Peck

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Posted 22 January 2020 - 07:53 PM

A bird bath would work but I really got the microscope for winter use. Single digit overnight temps F make outside water collectors a non-starter.



#14 Microscopy

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Posted 23 January 2020 - 09:25 AM

"If I had a tray of water outside it would be ice with a foot or more of snow on top."

"Single digit overnight temps F make outside water collectors a non-starter."

 

You would be surprised how much active live there can be underneath a thick layer of ice/snow...

 

Years ago I started writing something like (that was the working title): "1 000 objects for microscopy in your small city apartment during winter". 

I wondered if it would be possible to study mitosis, using for example canned asparagus (it is). If it would be possible to study mammal histology using freshly bought meat or canned/frozen meat products (it is). If it would be possible ... Most of it was, but as there were already that many guides on microscopy, I left the idea.


Edited by Microscopy, 23 January 2020 - 09:33 AM.

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#15 Jim4321

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Posted 23 January 2020 - 09:50 AM

I don't know for sure, but I'd bet that some moss from under the snow would yield some animalcules after a few hours of soaking.  I'd probably avoid hot or warm water, to avoid temperature shock.  Just bring it inside with some snow in a shallow dish and let it warm up gradually.

 

Jim H.

 

(on edit) I find that micro life shows up well with top lighting and a dark background.


Edited by Jim4321, 23 January 2020 - 09:52 AM.


#16 Microscopy

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Posted 25 January 2020 - 06:21 AM

It's not that hard to breed some random critters, but it is next to impossible for an amateur to maintain cultures containing only one species in the long run (that's where all those protozoa kits fail big time).

For the later case one needs an environment able to carefully control all parameters : light, temperature, pH, ... Meaning a well equipped microbiology lab,  access to all kinds of equipment/chemicals and a good knowledge of chemistry (action of buffer solutions, someone?). It's next to impossible for most people. 

It doesn't sound all that hard, but how many people does one know to have access to a decent pH-meter or a balance accurate to 1 (10, 100) mg? How many people able and equipped well enough to measure BOD?

As a second choice one can (and most do) try to breed some critters in kind of a wildlife setting (a few buckets in the garden, a bird bath), trying to make the most of it, in the meanwhile (as kind of a fortunate byproduct) studying succesion in that kind of limited ecosystems...

 

Well, on the other hand: if one doesn't know how to create favorable conditions for a species/isn't able to do so: studying the effect on declining conditions can be very interesting as well: many protozoa will start enaging in conjugation if conditions worsen. The same goes for some green algae (Spirogyra!) which BTW are far less difficult to breed smile.gif .

 

These are some pictures I made in the 1980's (I posted these in another tread some time ago), using worsening conditions in the test tube/petri dish:

 

paramecia-conjugation.jpg

Conjugation in Paramecia

 

Spirogyra-conjugation.jpg

Conjugation in Spirogyra


Edited by Microscopy, 25 January 2020 - 06:52 AM.

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#17 ANKry

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Posted 06 March 2020 - 02:42 AM

I take water from a city pond. The abundance of living creatures is surprising.

 

49625692681_1615d16d05_c.jpg[url=https://flic.kr/p/2iBfDv4]


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#18 frank5817

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Posted 07 March 2020 - 10:47 PM

That ciliated protozoan is Dileptus anser very common predatory organism in lake Michigan.


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#19 ANKry

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Posted 08 March 2020 - 02:55 AM

That ciliated protozoan is Dileptus anser very common predatory organism in lake Michigan.

Thank you for the information.



#20 ANKry

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Posted 08 March 2020 - 03:10 AM

From the same pond

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