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Which tripod are you using for the classic orange tube c8?

Celestron classic
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#1 Chirp1

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Posted 03 November 2019 - 01:28 PM

So I have this classic orange tube c8 now and was wondering what you guys are using for a tripod. I want to just get it up off the table and use it as an alt az. Maybe get a wedge later. 

 

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#2 GalaxyPiper

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Posted 03 November 2019 - 02:05 PM

With mine, it came with the original double fork leg tripod, but found out to my dismay that it was pretty wobbly.

 

classifieds-222710-0-39781500-1517217976

 

Then, I purchased the black C-14 tripod and found a heavier base for it that allows me to zero in on the N.C.P.. a lot better.

 

s-l1600.jpg

 

That second one is much better and both mounts will fit it. And...it's on ebay right now starting bid for $64.75...from GB.

But the wedge and those tripods are 35 years old, and the mounts are so much better these days.

If you can swing it, I would purchase a Celestron AVX mount and get a wide 18 inch dovetail to fit the C8, and take it out of those forks and set them aside as a collectors item.

Then I would invest in a Baader Allen Gee Mark II Telecompressor.

 

https://www.cloudyni...telecompressor/

 

But for my money right now, I would buy that black tripod...like right now..now....go...go. It's a no brainier, and you can start using your scope.

It's going to be on ebay for nine days if you or someone starts the bidding process, but you can make an offer. Give it a shot.

Trust me, those black forks are built like a tank and are not really that heavy.


Edited by GalaxyPiper, 04 November 2019 - 10:02 AM.

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#3 Don W

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Posted 03 November 2019 - 06:34 PM

It will be difficult to track things in Alt-Az without an Altitude drive of some sort. Better to put on a wedge as GalaxyPiper has stated.


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#4 Littlegreenman

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Posted 03 November 2019 - 07:42 PM

With mine, it came with the original double fork leg tripod, but found out to my dismay that it was pretty wobbly.

 

classifieds-222710-0-39781500-1517217976

 

Then, I purchased the black C-14 tripod and found a heavier base for it that allows me to zero in on the N.C.P.. a lot better.

 

 

 

That second one is much better and both mounts will fit it. And...it's on ebay right now starting bid for $64.75...from GB.

But the wedge and those tripods are 35 years old, and the mounts are so much better these days.

If you can swing it, I would purchase a Celestron AVX mount and get a wide 18 inch dovetail to fit the C8, and take it out of those forks and set them aside as a collectors item.

Then I would invest in a Baader Allen Gee Mark II Telecompressor.

 

https://www.cloudyni...telecompressor/

 

But for my money right now, I would buy those black forks...like right now..now....go...go. It's a no brainier, and you can start using your scope.

It's going to be on ebay for nine days if you or someone starts the bidding process, but you can make an offer. Give it a shot.

Trust me, those black forks are built like a tank and are not really that heavy.

The tripod in the pic of this post has come to be referred to as the "triangle locked tripod," which I will refer to as the triangle tripod.  They are only available on the used market, such as Cloudynights.

The choice of a tripod for a C8 hinges (ahem) on whether or not you plan to try astrophotography. If you do, plan to get a really stable, really really stable, tripod.

With any mount poor setup or loose fittings can result a wobbly or shaking mount. I've been quite happy over the years with the triangle tripod and wedge for 8" SCTs.

If wobbly, try this:

Check every bolt from the ground up all the way to the eyepiece. All it takes is one loose bolt to allow for shakes. This is true for every mount!

The legs on the triangle tripod should be pulled out from the center when set up. You want to take any slack out so the slats that connect the legs to the small hub sitting on the ground are in tension.

The round top of the tripod usually has a hole in the center. You can use that to hang a weight between the tripod legs. I've never felt the need.

If setting up on grass on soft earth, press the legs into the ground. Some of those tripods have a little shelf by the feet to put your foot on for that purpose.

If setting up on a hard surface, Celestron Tripod Vibration Pods, or other brands, really do help.

Some people have made leg spreaders, usually of wood, that fit in between the legs.

It's possible some people after all this will still finds the results too shaky. Fortunately, you have other choices!

 

Ergonomics of the triangle tripod

Light weight. Long, but still portable. The legs fold up from the ground over the top. When folding the legs up fold the slats into a leg first to keep them under control, otherwise they flip around chaotically. When all the legs are folded up I wrap a bungee cord around the legs to keep the legs and slats tight. A carry strap can be added if you wish.

 

The second tripod is quite stable, and less fuzzy to set up. This style is often referred to as a field tripod. Celestron and Meade both make them and have made lighter and heavier versions. The legs telescope and fold inward for storage and are shorter. They are heavier. Sometimes that is an issue.

Can anyone chime in if this is the Celestron tripod that the locks to keep the legs in place when extended are the ones that are prone to breaking? (if so there are some do-it-yourself fixes)

 

Costs, not including shipping:

Wedge $65-100 for a basic wedge.

The triangle tripod used range around $75-100

The second tripod ??? $75-175, heavier to ship.


Edited by Littlegreenman, 03 November 2019 - 07:54 PM.

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#5 John Higbee

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Posted 03 November 2019 - 10:30 PM

I second littlegreenman's comments.  I have locked triangle tripods for my C8, C11, and C14 (all Orange tubes from the '70s and early '80s).  My C8 has a lighter version than the heavy-duty version the 11 and 14 use.

 

If properly adjusted and assembled, this tripod design provides the best combination of rigidity, strength, vibration dampening, and portability of any tripod system I have used...far better than the "adjustable leg" tripods that Meade and Celestron adopted in the '80s  In more than a few cases, a leg "spontaneously retracting" under load has produced incipient heart failure and/or scope damage for the hapless observer/owner!

 

Proper adjustment (assuming all of the bolts holding the legs to the tripod head are installed) requires you to examine the "tensioner bolt" at the top of each leg...it protrudes from the back of each leg and contacts the circular head of the tripod.  It needs to be tightened (extended), and locked with its locking nut, so that it takes moderate effort to put the lower braces into the circular hub at ground level.  Once done, the tripod is both rigid and damps vibration rapidly.

 

Clear skies!  John 


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#6 kansas skies

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Posted 03 November 2019 - 10:32 PM

I also use the locked triangle tripod and wedge with my C8. As mentioned above, I find it very lightweight, but sufficiently sturdy for visual use as well.

 

Bill


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#7 apfever

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Posted 04 November 2019 - 01:40 AM

I've had a bunch of these. The locked triangle tripod is excellent when adjusted. The sand cast version has better engineering structurally. The sand cast also has a superior tension bolt in the top section of each leg. Either die cast or sand cast will perform fine when adjusted. 


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#8 Kasmos

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Posted 04 November 2019 - 04:33 AM

I've always liked the locked triangle tripods too. It's been long since I've used my C8 but I thought it worked very well the last time I used it on the C5.


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#9 Joe Cepleur

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Posted 05 November 2019 - 09:35 PM

Yup! John Higbee nailed it. You already have the tripod you need. It is made of spring steel, and is designed to be stiff when properly tensioned. It also weighs almost nothing!

To assemble the tripod, first put two legs into the center clip. That's easy, because there is no tension yet. Then, kneel down and, with your body against the third leg, pull the center clip onto that leg's catch. That will take a bit of strength, because you will be pulling the tripod into tension.
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#10 highfnum

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Posted 06 November 2019 - 08:40 AM

took mine off bayers fork mount

have cge bar and mount it on my lxd55 mount 

all reverseable with no new holes or undoable  changes



#11 Terra Nova

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Posted 06 November 2019 - 02:15 PM

I’m one of the few that like the Celestron Wedge-pod. I find it very stable and easy to move in and out of the house. I just loosen to top bolt that the base of the C-8 hangs off of, undo the two other 3/8” bolts and lift the scope and it’s fork off. Fold the legs in, and carry the wedge-pod out the kitchen door to the deck. Then the scope on its fork mount get carried out and secured. The whole operation takes a couple of minutes. I had a locking tripod and gave it away. I just didn’t like it. It seemed rickety. I re-purposed my wedge and put it on a wooden surveyors tripod for use with my Questar.

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#12 Augustus

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Posted 06 November 2019 - 05:20 PM

I use my Tricolor's original tripod (which I need to polish one of these days).

 

Personally I hate the Wedgepod and extendable tripods, and I find the triangle tripod to be extremely sturdy.


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#13 Terra Nova

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Posted 06 November 2019 - 05:40 PM

I use my Tricolor's original tripod (which I need to polish one of these days).

 

Personally I hate the Wedgepod and extendable tripods, and I find the triangle tripod to be extremely sturdy.

I think just about everybody except me hates the Wedgepod. I find it very convenient, especially since I leave my C8 set up on it and displayed in the house when I’m not using it and I never travel beyond the deck with it either so it works great. I have the deck marked where the legs go so it perfectly oriented and leveled every time. Couldn’t be easier. I hated that locking tripod. To me it was like wrestling an octopus!


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#14 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 06 November 2019 - 06:14 PM

Never tried  or looked at the Wedgepod ..........

 I have a die cast era tripod for the 1973 C-8 and someday I will hopefully locate a period correct sandcast tripod

   Admittedly, I had trouble with it initially and now I have it more solid

    I traded my old Meade 2080 field tripod for an old C-14 beast tripod   look up solid in the dictionary and see this tripod

     It handles the deforked 1979 College student modified C-8 on the Losmandy AZ-8 and anything else really

       Can't resist posting the pics  although some have seen these before

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#15 John Higbee

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Posted 06 November 2019 - 09:44 PM

Yes - the C-11/14 heavy duty locked triangle tripod carries my 55 pound OTA, along with another 50 pounds or so of fork arms, mount base, and wedge, with nary a problem.  Cosmetically it shows it's 40+ years usage in duller finish tripod legs, but it's the "Rock of Gibraltar" as far as suitability goes!

 

When I have my C14 set up for observing, the whole assembly goes on a "ScopeBuggy" allowing location shift whenever required.

 

John


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#16 Littlegreenman

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Posted 07 November 2019 - 12:28 AM

I think just about everybody except me hates the Wedgepod. I find it very convenient, especially since I leave my C8 set up on it and displayed in the house when I’m not using it and I never travel beyond the deck with it either so it works great. I have the deck marked where the legs go so it perfectly oriented and leveled every time. Couldn’t be easier. I hated that locking tripod. To me it was like wrestling an octopus!

When I first used the locking tripod, I think I would have preferred wrestling an octopus. One day out of frustration I took the time to think through the process. One issue was the slats when not connected to each other can flail around wildly.  Like the Robot's arms in Lost in Space when he gets hysterical.

To solve this I hold one leg and the slat that attached to it with one hand. So the slat is not loose. Then do the same with another leg. Only move one leg at a time. It can be done.

 

Now for something completely different: The Tuthill Isostatic Mount.

I never used one. But I want to. I could not find a single link that had decent pics and explanation. [Edit: I mean to say some links had good pics or not, and some had good explanation and comments, or not. But I couldn't find one link that everything!]

One leg of the tripod can be raised or lowered for the latitude you are at. The whole tripod is tilted at the same angle you would set a wedge. You bolt the fork base directly onto the tripod, and no wedge is needed.

People who like them really like them. I think it is made to observe sitting on a chair?

Reports pretty say it it stable. although it may not look it.

Some should resurrect them.

Here is a link to a Google search, which can waste a whole evening of your time:

 

https://www.google.c...Q4dUDCAs&uact=5


Edited by Littlegreenman, 07 November 2019 - 01:28 PM.

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#17 John Higbee

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Posted 07 November 2019 - 05:13 AM

Here's a comparison picture of the C8 and the C14 at Spruce Knob, WV...this was our setup at the 2015 Almost Heaven Star Party.

 

AHSP 2015 - Red Field.jpg


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#18 Joe Cepleur

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Posted 07 November 2019 - 09:05 AM

"I hated that locking tripod. To me it was like wrestling an octopus!"

That is an entirely fair assessment! The trick is knowing how to wrestle with an octopus; or, better, how to persuade an octopus to relax.

First, tie a loop of rope that can be slid over the folded octopus, to keep its flailing legs and linkages together in storage. Only slide that loop off when the octopus is standing on its hub on a large, empty patch of floor or ground. Fold the legs down to the ground, then lift the hub to finish reversing the legs. Note that connecting the linkages is easier on carpet, grass, or dirt than on a smooth floor, so that the octopus's feet are less likely to slide outward after lifting the hub, which would allow the hub to fall.

The "rickitiness" comes not so much from the properly tensioned tripod, as from a quirk of the wedge. To enable the wedge to be adjusted for use near the equator, Celestron designed it with too much overhang for latitudes further toward the poles. At least on the 8-inch model (I have no experience with the 11-inch), that long lever arm resonates, allowing the scope to wiggle a bit too long before settling. There is a thread in which a member built a custom mounting plate, out of oak, to replace the wedge's original adjustable, cast metal mounting plate. This stopped the wigglies pretty well completely. Celestron would have served astronomy better, but complicated its manufacturing and distribution, if it had offered different mounting plates for different latitudes.

Edited by Joe Cepleur, 07 November 2019 - 09:07 AM.

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#19 Kasmos

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Posted 07 November 2019 - 04:57 PM

The "rickitiness" comes not so much from the properly tensioned tripod, as from a quirk of the wedge. To enable the wedge to be adjusted for use near the equator, Celestron designed it with too much overhang for latitudes further toward the poles. At least on the 8-inch model (I have no experience with the 11-inch), that long lever arm resonates, allowing the scope to wiggle a bit too long before settling. There is a thread in which a member built a custom mounting plate, out of oak, to replace the wedge's original adjustable, cast metal mounting plate. This stopped the wigglies pretty well completely. Celestron would have served astronomy better, but complicated its manufacturing and distribution, if it had offered different mounting plates for different latitudes.

I can't speak for the sand cast C8, but the sand cast C5 wedge keeps the base of scope lower and much closer to the center of the tripod than the die cast C5 wedge.


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#20 Scharvey

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Posted 11 November 2019 - 07:01 PM

l'm new to the forum but I wanted to share. I also have the original orange C-8 (with some mods, 7 x 50 finder) and I was disappointed with the original C-8 tripod, (as someone else mentioned). I took it back and replaced it with the Meade tripod and wedge from the same vintage. It's worked beautifully! The eyepiece holder is my own addition.  


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#21 Scharvey

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Posted 11 November 2019 - 07:29 PM

Oops. Photo didn't attach....

Sorry.

S.

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#22 jgraham

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Posted 11 November 2019 - 09:21 PM

+1 for the ol' locked triangle tripod. If it's wobbly, then it needs to be adjusted. Each leg has a tension screw at the top that should contact the top piece of the tripod before the legs are locked. This is what applies tension to each leg making the assembly very lightweight an rigid.

 

Celestron C5-8 (11-24-2015)-2.jpg

 

Plan-B; a Meade standard field tripod also works very well and has adjustable legs. The Celestron wedge fits with the addition of spacers to lift it a tad off the top of the tripod...

 

Celestron C8 (7-16-2015)-2.jpg

 

I also have the C14 version of the locked triangle tripod. It is a bit of a beast, but lighter than the Meade Giant field tripod.

 


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