Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

What will planetary viewers do now

  • Please log in to reply
20 replies to this topic

#1 grif 678

grif 678

    Apollo

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1470
  • Joined: 22 Dec 2010
  • Loc: NC

Posted 07 November 2019 - 08:32 PM

First Mars, now Jupiter, soon Saturn will leave the night skies for a while, Mars for nearly two years. So for the die hard planetary viewers, what will your plans be during this time.



#2 Jim Davis

Jim Davis

    Skylab

  • *****
  • Posts: 4022
  • Joined: 05 Jul 2014
  • Loc: Lewisberry, PA

Posted 07 November 2019 - 08:48 PM

First Mars, now Jupiter, soon Saturn will leave the night skies for a while, Mars for nearly two years. So for the die hard planetary viewers, what will your plans be during this time.

Mars opposition is in less than a year. October 13th 2020. Some really cool Mars-Jupiter-Saturn conjunctions in the morning sky in March.


  • CollinofAlabama, Illinois, payner and 1 other like this

#3 Spikey131

Spikey131

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 959
  • Joined: 07 Feb 2017

Posted 07 November 2019 - 09:04 PM

1.  They get more sleep.

 

2.  Neptune, Uranus, Mercury, Venus are still up there.


  • Ohmless likes this

#4 Xeroid

Xeroid

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1447
  • Joined: 21 Sep 2013
  • Loc: USA

Posted 07 November 2019 - 09:11 PM

Ah, most likely we will be watching reruns of Gilligan's Island?

lol.gif

 

.... So for the die hard planetary viewers, what will your plans be during this time.


  • CollinofAlabama and Littlegreenman like this

#5 Ssayer

Ssayer

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 54
  • Joined: 20 Aug 2019
  • Loc: S.E Michigan

Posted 07 November 2019 - 09:39 PM

Ah, most likely we will be watching reruns of Gilligan's Island?

lol.gif

Those poor people!!! frown.gif  wink.gif


  • Redbetter likes this

#6 Shorty Barlow

Shorty Barlow

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1053
  • Joined: 15 Sep 2015
  • Loc: Lloegyr

Posted 07 November 2019 - 09:55 PM

med_gallery_249298_5348_307952.pngmed_gallery_249298_5348_371557.pngmed_gallery_249298_5348_444662.png

 

Low, yes. Gone, no.

 

Mars opposition is every other year.


  • Illinois and Hugh Peck like this

#7 CollinofAlabama

CollinofAlabama

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2876
  • Joined: 24 Nov 2003
  • Loc: Lubbock, Texas, USA

Posted 07 November 2019 - 11:14 PM

Eastern quadrature for Neptune is the early morning of December 8th, for Uranus, just past midnight on January 23rd.  Venus reaches its highest point in the sky in late March with a spectacular crescent late April through May.  Saturn and Jupiter return with oppositions a week apart in July, and Mars will (with any luck) give a more wonderful apparition in October of 2020, sans planet-wide dust storms.  In the mean time, the moon belly dances through her wonderful phases this entire time, and a host of double stars bedazzle us all as well.

 

But November 2019 is hardly over yet.  One can still catch Jupiter and Saturn for a little longer, below rising Venus, and watch Venus slowly overtake Jupiter, with their closest on the 24th of this month, when she overtakes Great Jove.  And her ascending scenario repeats with Saturn throughout the first half of December.

 

Plenty to see from now until next November.  Enjoy your night skies, folks!  If it's cloudy, you can watch Gilligan's Isle, but there's also Star Trek.


  • Hugh Peck likes this

#8 Redbetter

Redbetter

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 8089
  • Joined: 16 Feb 2016
  • Loc: Central Valley, CA

Posted 08 November 2019 - 01:20 AM

Those poor people!!! frown.gif  wink.gif

For those that don't recall the reference:  link for Galaxy Quest



#9 Alex65

Alex65

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 15
  • Joined: 03 Apr 2019
  • Loc: Scotland

Posted 08 November 2019 - 01:57 AM

Hoping that a nice bright comet might suddenly make a spectacular appearance, a la Hale-Bopp!

 

Otherwise, I always have the Moon.


  • Ohmless likes this

#10 aa6ww

aa6ww

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2097
  • Joined: 23 Oct 2011
  • Loc: Sacramento, Calif.

Posted 08 November 2019 - 01:41 PM

Ghost of Jupiter is out now, its a pretty cool object to observe. Saturn Nebula also, another nice planetary nebula. All Planetary nebulars are usually easy to find using small refractors.

Double stars are fun for refractor guys with small portable back yard scopes.

Asterisms are pretty fun to observe, open clusters, objects like this which are easy to locate and have fun with, with small refractors.

I had some nice views of Uranus and Neptune last weekend. Its takes some magnification to realize they are planets and not stars.

Are people really in this hobby just to look at the planets?

...Ralph

#11 Ohmless

Ohmless

    Ranger 4

  • *****
  • Posts: 397
  • Joined: 05 Jun 2017
  • Loc: Flint, Michigan USA

Posted 08 November 2019 - 07:58 PM

Luna has lots to offer and it is up every clear night! :D


  • Hugh Peck and Alex65 like this

#12 Zorbathegeek

Zorbathegeek

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • Posts: 38
  • Joined: 19 Jul 2019

Posted 09 November 2019 - 01:13 AM

Well from my latitude I'm waiting for Uranus to transit and clear my neighbours walnut tree before midnight! I'm looking forward to having some long spells observing this blue-green stranger and hopefully getting some high magnification if the seeing allows. Apparent size and magnitude are still very good for a couple of months. I'm also getting the scope out every clear evening to view Venus and will start looking for Mars in the morning sky sometime next month. That's the great thing about astronomy - there's always something wondrous to look forward too and it's never the same twice.



#13 Redbetter

Redbetter

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 8089
  • Joined: 16 Feb 2016
  • Loc: Central Valley, CA

Posted 09 November 2019 - 03:02 AM

Uranus' size and magnitude don't change all that much throughout the year because of its distance.



#14 Jim Davis

Jim Davis

    Skylab

  • *****
  • Posts: 4022
  • Joined: 05 Jul 2014
  • Loc: Lewisberry, PA

Posted 09 November 2019 - 11:01 AM

Apparently, Mars Season has begun: https://www.cloudyni...-season-begins/



#15 Ken Watts

Ken Watts

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 268
  • Joined: 19 Sep 2016
  • Loc: Sun City, Az

Posted 09 November 2019 - 12:46 PM

When I have the energy, I suppose I will enjoy the night sky through a low power eyepiece just wandering around.  Of course my new found excitement with observing the moon will be appeased!

 

Clear and steady skies,

 

Ken W 



#16 David Gray

David Gray

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1667
  • Joined: 06 Aug 2012
  • Loc: Ower Yonder 01.5ºW. 55ºN (UK)

Posted 09 November 2019 - 01:47 PM

Apparently, Mars Season has begun: https://www.cloudyni...-season-begins/

And Visually..........might have been more by now had we ever got more breaks from the rain here.........

 

https://www.cloudyni...8-mars-returns/


  • Hugh Peck likes this

#17 Shorty Barlow

Shorty Barlow

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1053
  • Joined: 15 Sep 2015
  • Loc: Lloegyr

Posted 09 November 2019 - 02:24 PM

Apparently, Mars Season has begun: https://www.cloudyni...-season-begins/

Yay Mars Season! *dusts off Mars filters*

 

med_gallery_249298_5348_40343.jpg


  • Ohmless likes this

#18 grif 678

grif 678

    Apollo

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1470
  • Joined: 22 Dec 2010
  • Loc: NC

Posted 09 November 2019 - 03:08 PM

Ghost of Jupiter is out now, its a pretty cool object to observe. Saturn Nebula also, another nice planetary nebula. All Planetary nebulars are usually easy to find using small refractors.

Double stars are fun for refractor guys with small portable back yard scopes.

Asterisms are pretty fun to observe, open clusters, objects like this which are easy to locate and have fun with, with small refractors.

I had some nice views of Uranus and Neptune last weekend. Its takes some magnification to realize they are planets and not stars.

Are people really in this hobby just to look at the planets?

...Ralph

If we all had very dark skies, the other objects in the sky would be a lot of fun also. But where I live, the last several years with all the new houses and businesses coming up close by, the moon and the planets are about all one can see, except for the few brightest stars.


  • Hugh Peck likes this

#19 Zorbathegeek

Zorbathegeek

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • Posts: 38
  • Joined: 19 Jul 2019

Posted 09 November 2019 - 04:27 PM

Uranus' size and magnitude don't change all that much throughout the year because of its distance.

This is true, and although the change is not great, from my urban location and with my small scope, observation at the opposition time of the year is clearly better than at conjunction.



#20 aa6ww

aa6ww

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2097
  • Joined: 23 Oct 2011
  • Loc: Sacramento, Calif.

Posted 10 November 2019 - 11:49 PM

My skies are pretty bad where I live in my back yard. SQM 18.79 over here based on this sites infomation:

 

https://www.lightpol...s=0BFFFFFTFFFTF

 

I can still see almost all the messiers in my back yard with my 92mm refractor, but I no longer star hop and use my AVX mount with starsense, so maybe thats cheating?

 

Before my AVX mount, it was a struggle finding objects in my back yard unless it was a dark moon night with very good transparancy.

 

...Ralph

 

 

If we all had very dark skies, the other objects in the sky would be a lot of fun also. But where I live, the last several years with all the new houses and businesses coming up close by, the moon and the planets are about all one can see, except for the few brightest stars.



#21 Jdrasberry

Jdrasberry

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 24
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2018
  • Loc: Littleton, Colorado

Posted Yesterday, 08:21 AM

Well I guess I’ll have to start going to sleep early at night so I can get up at two or three in the morning to see Jupiter and Saturn. 

 

Joe


Edited by Jdrasberry, Yesterday, 08:23 AM.



CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics