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Nikon amp glow

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#1 drknapper

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Posted 08 November 2019 - 09:48 PM

The was a discussion some time ago that the Nikon d5300 did not have any amp glow like the d5200.  Can anyone confirm this?



#2 17.5Dob

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Posted 08 November 2019 - 11:36 PM

The D5300 has very noticeable amp glow at longer exposures/higher ISO's, but it's NOTHING compared to the D5200/D7100.



#3 sharkmelley

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Posted 09 November 2019 - 02:40 AM

The Nikon D5300 definitely has amp glow in the bias and darks. 

You can see it in these examples:

 

https://www.cloudyni...view/?p=8903222

 

Mark


Edited by sharkmelley, 09 November 2019 - 02:43 AM.


#4 Alen K

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Posted 09 November 2019 - 10:32 AM

The Nikon D5300 definitely has amp glow in the bias and darks. 

You can see it in these examples:

 

https://www.cloudyni...view/?p=8903222

 

I naively always assumed amp glow was thermally related. That it wouldn't be a problem except when the sensor gets very warm. But if it shows up in bias frames, as it did in your test, which Many people seem to take at room ambient temperature (or so I have heard) and with ultra-short exposures then what does that say about it? 



#5 sharkmelley

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Posted 09 November 2019 - 10:44 AM

I naively always assumed amp glow was thermally related. That it wouldn't be a problem except when the sensor gets very warm. But if it shows up in bias frames, as it did in your test, which Many people seem to take at room ambient temperature (or so I have heard) and with ultra-short exposures then what does that say about it?

Amp glow is not a good name to describe what is going on here. It is certainly true that some glows are thermally related but this one is caused by Near Infra-Red emissions from nearby circuitry on the sensor. This is happening when the image is being read from the sensor, which it why it appears equally bright in the bias frames and in the darks.

ZWO has some good information on this type of glow, especially the "star-burst" variety:
https://astronomy-im...s-amp-glow.html

Mark

Edited by sharkmelley, 09 November 2019 - 11:52 AM.


#6 drknapper

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Posted 09 November 2019 - 03:43 PM

Thanks for all the info!




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