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NV Observing report 11/8 2019

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#1 GOLGO13

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Posted 09 November 2019 - 12:31 AM

Had a nice night of observing tonight. With the Moon pretty full it wasn't probably as good as it could have been. And don't forget the Moon! Was observing it earlier with my 103s. It is the best object in the sky to me. And can be observed with near any telescope.

 

It was frosty out there today. My 6 inch F4 looks like it was actually doing imaging as it was frosted over good. 26 F was the temp.

 

Have you guys ever taken NV for granted? I did today. I was looking at the Orion Nebula, which is really stunning with NV. It and the Swan nebula are probably the best so far in my opinion NV wise. Well, the lagoon is nice also. Anyways, I'm like, oh...I should put in a regular eyepiece and look at Orion. And here I am thinking, wow, I can see the running man but where is Orion (and why the heck can I see the running man). OH! That is Orion!! What a gigantic difference NV makes on nebulas in light pollution!

 

I did make one mistake. I brought in the NV unit, then thought I should see barnard's loop at 1x. Well, not going to happen as it's now dew full. And I need to get some sleep.

 

So, yeah. I'm staying up late and going out in 26 degree weather, because NV is that good.


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#2 Eddgie

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Posted 09 November 2019 - 08:20 AM

Fun report!

 

Yeah, for nebula, it is hard to get people to understand how good NV can be.  Many say it is not as effective on galaxies, but I have had great success with it seeing galaxies from my white zone in my 12" that I could not make out in my C14.

 

If you have not seen Barnard's Loop yet, prepare to be amazed.  As with nebula in general, the visual impact of Barnards is quite spectacular becuase it is right there, so big that it swallows up more than half of the constellation of Orion. 

 

You will see it with light pollution, but everyone needs to see it from a very dark sky sometime using a wider pass filter (12nm) so you can see it all at once (with very narrow filters, you need to pan around to take it in). I don't think a view of anything in the sky with even the widest of wide field conventional eyepieces can hold a candle to this majestic nebula as viewed in the puny 40 degree apparent field of an NV device.

 

Nice report!  Stay warm out there! 


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#3 Lukes1040

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Posted 09 November 2019 - 08:51 AM

Nice report!

I agree with Eddgie that NV does indeed help with galaxies. I was actually testing this last night, trying to find M74 from my bortle 5/6 backyard with it sitting about 23 deg from the moon. I used a narrow band lp filter and was able to just see it. Couldn’t notice anything with a glass ep.

Barnard’s loop has been my favorite object to see by far at 1x in NV. This time of the year is nice for me because it’s up when I get up for work in the morning, so I can just go out and check it out for a few minutes before heading off to work. Don’t forget to scan up to the angelfish!

#4 Gavster

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Posted 09 November 2019 - 10:13 AM

I agree Barnard’s Loop is amazing with nv. From both lp and dark sites I personally prefer narrower band ha filters which imo bring out the contrast more on the nebulae and make them seem brighter (despite some bandshift from the narrow filter). Here is a 20 second phone shot through my nv monoculars with a 5nm chroma ha filter.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 13301D47-84A7-48C5-AA2B-F0F94FC08184.jpeg

Edited by Gavster, 09 November 2019 - 10:15 AM.

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#5 Jeff Morgan

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Posted 09 November 2019 - 10:42 AM

For the NV astronomer, there is something even better than Galaxy Clusters: Nebula Clusters!

 

In the winter sky, frame it right at 1x and you can get the M42 complex, Barnards Loop, Horsehead, Flame, Angelfish, Seagull, Cone/FoxFur complex, Rosette, Lowers, Monkey Head, and Jellyfish all in the same FOV. And you can probably pick up many lesser known Sharpless nebula like the 280-284 chain.


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#6 careysub

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Posted 09 November 2019 - 12:49 PM

Last night I took my first shot at observing nebulae with my Mod 3C, also tested a few lenses that I have gotten all the adapters and filter rings for.

 

I was observing from my backyard in Rancho Cucamonga, which is near San Bernardino in the Inland Empire of Southern California.

 

With the FotodioX Canon EF to C-Mount Pro Lens Mount Adapter* from BH Photo my Canon F/1.8 50mm "Nifty Fifty" gave nice wide field views.

 

My Solignor 80-300mm (Canon FD base) did not come into focus at infinity, almost, but not quite - so a $30 white elephant (with shipping on eBay).

 

I have four C-Mount native lenses, all of which came into focus, and worked well.

 

My Vivitar 75-205mm lens (T-mount) worked came into focus, and worked well.

 

I tested an Optolong 7A 48mm filter, and a 5A 1.25" filter from the eBay filter guy on Orion. The 5A filter with the Vivitar at 205mm (7.6X) gave the best view, allowing easy observation of M42, M43 and the nearby NGC nebula complex. Significant structure within M42 could be detected.

 

*This is a $60 adapter, which is very nice. I have since found a simpler $30 version on BH Photo as well.


Edited by careysub, 09 November 2019 - 12:50 PM.


#7 careysub

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Posted 24 November 2019 - 03:38 PM

Last night I made my first trip to a dark sky site with my Mod 3C and filters.

 

Thus far, I have not been that impressed by the view of star fields with it - sure I could see stars where I could see none due to light pollution - but it wasn't what I would describe as a good star field view.

 

So last night I tried it in prime focus with a 22" F/5 Newtonian at Riverside Astronomical Society's GMARS site in Landers, CA.

 

I looked at the Crab Nebula and Orion Nebulas, using 12nm (Astronomik), 7nm and 5nm (bjomejag, the Omega seconds filter guy on eBay) H-alpha filters. And the views knocked my socks off (not good time to lose your socks, since weather was in the 30s).

 

I could actually see the structure of the Crab that I had only ever seen in photographs, comparing it with a visual filter (Thousand Oaks O-III) there was no comparison.

 

And the structural detail of Orion was incredible too, more than I see in photographs!

 

Switching the filters I found the narrower the better, continuous improvement as I went from 12nm to 5nm.


Edited by careysub, 24 November 2019 - 10:38 PM.

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#8 GOLGO13

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Posted 24 November 2019 - 06:42 PM

Last night I made my first trip to a dark sky site with my Mod 3C and filters.

 

Thus far, I have not been that impressed by the view of star fields with it - sure I could see stars where I could see none due to light pollution - but it wasn't what I would describe as a good star field view.

Careysub,

 

Do you have a IR pass filter yet such as this one: https://www.baader-p...r-(685-nm).html

 

That made a big difference on star fields in light pollution. Basically use your HA filters for nebulas and the IR pass for everything else.

 

I really need to get to some dark skies!! I've only used it in fairly heavy light pollution.



#9 Mazerski

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Posted 24 November 2019 - 07:11 PM

Carey,

 

As GO states, you need IR filter(s) — I mainly use the Astronomik 642nm and the views of star fields, Milky Way wispiness, clusters, globulars are great (in scope and hand held with Nikon lens (in my case)).  After a couple seasons of viewing, I still cannot decide if I prefer M42 with 6nm Ha filter or the 642nm.

 

If you do not own an IR filter, you’re missing out big time.



#10 careysub

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Posted 24 November 2019 - 10:37 PM

I do have IR pass filters (they are cheaper than the Ha narrow bands), which is what allows me to see stars where I could see none before. But the fields still seem a bit sparse, and there is active noise in the background instead of just darkness.

 

Still I only have a couple of observing sessions under my belt thus far, and will be working with more lenses and filters, etc. Also need to work out the gain adjustment knob business to see what effect that has. Currently I just have the knob off for adapter clearance.



#11 Dale Eason

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Posted 25 November 2019 - 01:56 AM

Can't wait to get to a dark site but tonight I went out into the back yard since it was clear for the first time in several weeks.  Hand held at 2x with 7nm HA swept from California (NV neck object straight up) down to Flaming star, Then Something at the foot of Gemini (SH2-261 I think, Rosette big and round.  About the biggest round thing I have so far seen.  Finally down to Orion and Barnards loop.  The loop was very dim and I needed dark adapted eyes to see it.  It was another wow night of about 10 minutes of viewing before I had to go in.  



#12 Dale Eason

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Posted 25 November 2019 - 01:57 AM

Oops, Might not had  seen Sh2-261 might have been the Crab instead.



#13 The Ardent

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Posted 25 November 2019 - 08:56 AM

Any NV handheld (small lens) viewing shows plentiful stars in all parts of the sky , except when I used poor lenses : zoom SLR and/or cheap c-mount lens .
Use a pair of 50mm binoculars to compare widefield visual with low-power NV. Binocs should show many more stars than eyeball, NV should show even more stars. Lens aperture should be wide open first, and then close in increments to reduce sky glow and interfering streetlights (if any) Find the right balance of filtering and aperture for best view.

IR filter should darken background sky.

Reduce the gain to reduce noise.


I do have IR pass filters (they are cheaper than the Ha narrow bands), which is what allows me to see stars where I could see none before. But the fields still seem a bit sparse, and there is active noise in the background instead of just darkness.

Still I only have a couple of observing sessions under my belt thus far, and will be working with more lenses and filters, etc. Also need to work out the gain adjustment knob business to see what effect that has. Currently I just have the knob off for adapter clearance.


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#14 GOLGO13

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Posted 25 November 2019 - 12:01 PM

I do have IR pass filters (they are cheaper than the Ha narrow bands), which is what allows me to see stars where I could see none before. But the fields still seem a bit sparse, and there is active noise in the background instead of just darkness.

 

Still I only have a couple of observing sessions under my belt thus far, and will be working with more lenses and filters, etc. Also need to work out the gain adjustment knob business to see what effect that has. Currently I just have the knob off for adapter clearance.

Careysub,

 

Which IR pass filter do you have? I suggest you heck the gain control knob as that could be the reason for issues. I adjust the control often when using the unit. And the gain control is different between the IR pass filters and the HA filters. The IR pass filters can take more gain in my experience. So that could explain some of the issues.



#15 Jeff Morgan

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Posted 25 November 2019 - 04:33 PM

Any NV handheld (small lens) viewing shows plentiful stars in all parts of the sky , except when I used poor lenses : zoom SLR and/or cheap c-mount lens .

 

Out of curiosity I wanted to get a fast estimate of magnitude gain of my NVD at 1x vs. naked eye.

 

Looking at the bowl of the Little Dipper just after astronomical twilight last week (SQM 20.3), I could just barely manage Eta (averted vision) at magnitude 4.98. None within the confines of the bowl.

 

Pointed my NVD at the bowl, I could easily see many stars, and counted down a short star chain just south of Zeta. The faintest I picked up with direct vision was SAO 8314 at magnitude 8.96. I was not using a filter.

 

If I had taken some time with this and relaxed into my zero gravity chair, I am fairly sure I could have counted more than 20 within the bowl - and gone fainter. As it is was I had dinner going in the oven, so it was a quick look.


Edited by Jeff Morgan, 25 November 2019 - 04:33 PM.

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#16 careysub

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Posted 26 November 2019 - 11:51 AM

Thanks all for the suggestions. I do have some cheap camera lenses (made sense to try those out first) and have not even tried the whole lot yet. I'll experiment with the various things.

 

I someone wants to recommend specific lenses that I should try...

 

That said - at a dark sky site with binos I can see star fields very nicely.

 

But with the NV tube showed nebulas in a way I could never see them before no matter what I did or tools I used. And I expect to put it to use in chasing the Billion Light Year Club objects, especially quasars. It is to see the things I cannot see in any other way that I bought it, and thus far it is delivering on that.



#17 The Ardent

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Posted 26 November 2019 - 01:20 PM

Vintage prime lenses : Nikon , Canon FD, Pentax K mount , Pentax M42 mount .

 

Why?

 

1. Adapters are readily available 

 

2. These lenses were made in large quantities and usually very good quality to satisfy the Japanese photo enthusiasts of the 20th century 35mm SLR film age. (I suspect this is why we have nice refractors and eyepieces today- Astronomy sure didn’t drive large scale lens industry) 

 

25mm to 100mm for handheld 

 

Any current lenses - provided adapter is available and reach infinity focus. I can’t comment on these. 


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#18 Jeff Morgan

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Posted 26 November 2019 - 04:45 PM

Love my Canon 50mm f/1.4!

 

I would not say that it is the "best" because there are great things to see at all image scales from 1x up to the telescopic fields. So "best" is really determined by the target.

 

But 50mm shows you constellations in a whole new way. shocked.gif



#19 gliese

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Posted 27 November 2019 - 05:39 PM

Are CLS filters good for NVD, please?

 

Not the CLS CCD, because if I understand correctly, they stop the IR (= greater than 650/700 nm), so we lose a lot of light to intensify, because several NVD are sensitive up to 800nm ​​or even 900. ...

 

And lose the IR radiation that is very common in nebulae, it's a "shame".

 

And even more, because it is a wavelength that is absent from light pollution halos, and therefore a very good thing to increase the SNR report.

 

Very Few manufacturers, give the curves after 700 nm, unfortunately . And many curves seem to plunge after 700nm. The  Lumicon deep sky filter let the IR pass , just like the CLS Astronomik and UHC , but only 60% transmission ....

http://www.astrosurf...ters/curves.htm

And H alpha filters have a narrow band and nothing pass in the IR.

 

.......When will there be a special filter for NVD ?!  fingertap.gif


Edited by gliese, 28 November 2019 - 04:57 PM.


#20 gliese

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Posted Yesterday, 08:17 AM

It would be nice if someone knew where to address the request , to make a special NVD filter  = With a tight band H.alpha (ex : 7nm) ,  AND the long red wavelengths allowed too = IR pass.

 

With conventional H alpha filters, we lose the huge part of IR .... because of the photographers for whom we made this filter . NVD  are IR sensitive : It's very obvious, when in a polluted place, we put IR pass filters, which remove all the visible light. And we see a lot of things in IR, poluted site. It's really sad that we're being removed of so much informations and light , with just a narrowband Halpha

 

Light pollution does not emit IR . And in addition, nebulae often emit a lot of IR .

So a Ha. + IR pass filter  =  a maximum specific light signal picked up, with a very very low background noise



#21 The Ardent

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Posted Yesterday, 10:40 AM

Baader 35nm Ha

My preferred filter not to extinguish the star “context” the nebulae reside in. 

 

It would be nice if someone knew where to address the request , to make a special NVD filter  = With a tight band H.alpha (ex : 7nm) ,  AND the long red wavelengths allowed too = IR pass.

 

With conventional H alpha filters, we lose the huge part of IR .... because of the photographers for whom we made this filter . NVD  are IR sensitive : It's very obvious, when in a polluted place, we put IR pass filters, which remove all the visible light. And we see a lot of things in IR, poluted site. It's really sad that we're being removed of so much informations and light , with just a narrowband Halpha

 

Light pollution does not emit IR . And in addition, nebulae often emit a lot of IR .

So a Ha. + IR pass filter  =  a maximum specific light signal picked up, with a very very low background noise




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