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Spots on the sensor or not when doing Ha?

CMOS refractor
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#1 kurtzepp

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Posted 19 November 2019 - 05:02 PM

So imaging IC 348 in Ha for a few nights last week and stacked them PI and noticed this giant ring in the center.  I stacked it in DSS without flats and still the same.  I then stacked just different nights and it was still there.  I thought about redoing some new flats and or cleaning the sensor of the ASI1600, however, on the last night I also move to NGC 1893 and got 30 min of that.  NGC 183 showed no signs of the mysterious ring.  Any ideas what happened.  I have attached unprocessed (other than cropping) for review.  I have never imaged IC 348 in Ha before, maybe the ring is real - it just looked too circular.  

 

- Kurt

Attached Thumbnails

  • HaTest_ABE1_ABE1.jpg
  • NGC1893_Ha_test1.jpg


#2 dmdouglass

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Posted 19 November 2019 - 05:24 PM

Well, a quick look at the data from the Digital Sky Survey shows this...

 

IC-348 CN.jpg

 

I searched around, and also did a search via Simbad, and no SH2 objects, just lots of reference to IC-348.



#3 dmdouglass

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Posted 19 November 2019 - 05:37 PM

And this.... from Wikipedia...

IC 348 is a star-forming region in the constellation Perseus located about 315 parsecs from the Sun. It consists of nebulosity and an associated 2-million-year-old cluster of roughly 400 stars within an angular diameter of 20″. The most massive stars in the cluster are the binary star system BD+31°643, which has a combined spectral class of B5.[3] Based upon infrared observations using the Spitzer Space Telescope, about half of the stars in the cluster have a circumstellar disk, of which 60% are thick or primordial disks.[4]

The age of this cluster has allowed three low mass brown dwarfs to be discovered. These objects lose heat as they age, so they are more readily discovered while they are still young.[5]


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