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ST Cassiopeiae carbon star

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#1 flt158

flt158

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Posted 27 November 2019 - 01:16 PM

Hello, everyone. 

 

I just thought to give a quick report that I observed another carbon star within Cassiopeia. 

ST Cassiopeiae has a decent orange tinge and is between 1500 and 2100 light years from Earth. 

Its spectral class is N3. 

It has not changed in magnitude for a few years, and I agree with the observer on www.aavso.org that it is of magnitude +9.1. 

There are plenty of field stars to guide anyone to locate ST Cas. 

I found its orangeness increases as I go up from 40X through to 167X with my William Optics 158 mm f/7 apochromatic refractor. 

It gave me no trouble to find it using the nice wide optical double star Schedar (Alpha Cassiopeiae) as the starting point on Tuesday 26th November 2019 about 2 hours after sunset. 

 

ST Cassiopeiae is my 74th observed carbon star. 

 

Thank you for reading. 

 

Comments are always welcome.  

 

Clear skies, 

 

Aubrey. 


Edited by flt158, 27 November 2019 - 06:57 PM.

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#2 sg6

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Posted 27 November 2019 - 01:20 PM

Do you use a chart, list or whatever of Carbon Stars?

Only ask as while searching out an old PC I have I sort of fell across a spreadsheet or table of carbon stars.

 

Just wondered where you got your objects from.


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#3 flt158

flt158

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Posted 27 November 2019 - 02:25 PM

I do get asked this question quite regularly, SQ6. 

My first ever starting point was an article on deep sky objects in December 2000 of a Sky and Telescope magazine. 

T Lyrae was my first carbon star. 

Then I discovered many are listed in Robert Burnham's Celestial Handbook which I still use today. 

The AL Carbon Star Program is another which plenty of maps.  

 

But lastly I was informed that there are some 2343 carbon stars available in the night sky which have a magnitude greater than +13.0

Eric (Cildarith) informed me that Simbad issues that list. 

Post #14 on 26 carbon stars in Andromeda dated 23rd February 2019 here on Cloudy Nights.  

 

So I doubt if I will ever exceed 1000 carbon stars.

100 would be very nice to achieve. 

 

I have had the Guide 9.1 DVD for a number of years now. 

I simply stick it in the PC - which does accept DVD's.

Find my carbon star and print it off.   

 

Clear skies from Aubrey. 




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