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S&T Hobby Killers identified!

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#51 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 30 November 2019 - 09:28 PM

Christmas 64 or was it 65?

Tasco 5vte    no .965's or 1.25's  just the cute little pull out lens

 Sometimes all you have is all you need ...if later either  you stay with it (the hobby) or come back to it

 it is all good

 

BTW   I am pleased to have this other 60mm  the quality build and smooth mount and great views,albeit only 60mm, are pretty darn good in a lightweight package...cool to look at as well

the Sweet little Mayflower 814, now converted to 1.25..

Attached Thumbnails

  • Tas co5vteIMG_3998.jpg
  • MayflowerhudsonpalmIMG_4238.jpg

Edited by Defenderslideguitar, 01 December 2019 - 09:54 AM.

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#52 vahe

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Posted 30 November 2019 - 09:47 PM

Back in the 50's my folks were not sufficiently affluent to afford a "store bought" telescope of any aperture or quality.  So I learned to cobble my own together starting with singlets of highly questionable lineage along with whatever cardboard tube came my way. 

 

Yes, I had a similar situation, a 60mm achromat was too fancy a scope for me, no chance of finding one where I lived at the time (Middle East) and even if I could find one I could not afford it. I assembled my first scope using a singlet as its objective, it was an oval shape piece of glass that I managed to remove from a broken eyeglass, one inch vertical and about 1 1/2" horizontal, for the eyepiece I managed to find an antique brass microscope ocular that produced roughly 30x.

The first view of Saturn through that scope turned this into a lifetime hobby.

.

Vahe


Edited by vahe, 30 November 2019 - 09:49 PM.

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#53 Terra Nova

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Posted 01 December 2019 - 10:37 AM

Christmas 64 or was it 65?

Tasco 5vte    no .965's or 1.25's  just the cute little pull out lens

 Sometimes all you have is all you need ...if later either  you stay with it (the hobby) or come back to it

 it is all good

 

BTW   I am pleased to have this other 60mm  the quality build and smooth mount and great views,albeit only 60mm, are pretty darn good in a lightweight package...cool to look at as well

the Sweet little Mayflower 814, now converted to 1.25..

https://youtu.be/fgIm1mJCyRU


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#54 Rich (RLTYS)

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Posted 01 December 2019 - 01:11 PM

Terra, thanks that brought back a lot of memories. Never had one but I remember the advertisement.waytogo.gif


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#55 G-Tower

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Posted 02 December 2019 - 07:42 AM

The 60mm scope was a sign of the times and some were very good overall. Good optics good mounts and some with collimatable cells! The eyepieces may have been the weak spot but some Kellners were pretty good as were some Orthos. Its not a scope I would bother observing with today but the sentimaental value is still there. Darn them childhood memories!


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#56 rolo

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Posted 02 December 2019 - 05:39 PM

Today's 5 best hobby killers

 

https://bestreviews....best-telescopes


Edited by rolo, 02 December 2019 - 05:45 PM.

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#57 Chuck Hards

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Posted 02 December 2019 - 05:49 PM

I only watch telescope videos with Dave Trott.  ;)


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#58 highfnum

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Posted 02 December 2019 - 06:57 PM

defenderslideguitar
is that Mr machine under telescope?

#59 rolo

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Posted 02 December 2019 - 07:21 PM

I only watch telescope videos with Dave Trott.  wink.gif

Do you go over his place to watch the videos? Would you watch them with me if we lived closer?


Edited by rolo, 02 December 2019 - 07:21 PM.

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#60 bbqediguana

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Posted 02 December 2019 - 09:15 PM

Today's 5 best hobby killers

 

https://bestreviews....best-telescopes

Bruh! The Orion, Celestron and Meade are all awesome! Well... once you put them onto an EQ-5 mount... and upgrade the diagonal... and upgrade the eyepieces... and maybe the finder... and maybe the focuser.... but otherwise, they ROCK! smile.gif


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#61 clamchip

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Posted 02 December 2019 - 09:20 PM

I remember my first 60mm, it just happened to be a Tasco 7TE-5 probably one of the best

60mm scopes although I didn't know that.

It was a jewel of perfection, mechanically and optically.

I thought it must be Tasco's way of saying 'welcome to astronomy' here's our introductory

model, when you want more aperture were here.

It was just like that. Ice cream makers pour tons of money on their vanilla, its the signature

of every ice cream maker. And I think the 60mm can be the 'signature' of telescope makers.

 

Robert


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#62 Chuck Hards

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Posted 03 December 2019 - 08:46 AM

Do you go over his place to watch the videos? Would you watch them with me if we lived closer?

My friend, I would bring the popcorn.  


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#63 kansas skies

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Posted 03 December 2019 - 06:20 PM

Do you go over his place to watch the videos? Would you watch them with me if we lived closer?

With an invitation like that, and taking into consideration the arsenal of scopes at your disposal, I'm afraid I'd turn into "The Thing That Wouldn't Leave"...

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=uHpFFHNRwS4

 

Bill


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#64 Mbinoc

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Posted 03 December 2019 - 11:59 PM

I forget what my first scope was, something my dad purchased for the family. What ever it was, could be clasified as a hobby killer.

 

It was a refactor with a fork mount, with no micro adjustment, and did not have a diagonal.

 

Knowing what I know now, I may have been able to enjoy it, but with no guidance it sadly got very little use, and caused more frustration than enjoyment.

 

I actually sold it on craigslist for a few bucks about a year before I becme re-interested in telescopes, I now wish I would have kept it, Just so I could know what it was.


Edited by Mbinoc, 04 December 2019 - 12:11 AM.

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#65 silodweller

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Posted 05 December 2019 - 07:26 AM

Huh, quite an interesting article... 

 

Although it makes me feel somewhat ashamed then to admit that the first telescope I ever had the privilege of using was an old draw scope which belonged to my Dad.  I roped a few broom handles together for a makeshift tripod and that was it.  That's the instrument that enabled me to see Saturn for the very first time even though the view I was afforded through that particular scope was nothing more than an odd shaped ball.  Still, I can remember the sheer excitement I felt when I found the beautiful ringed planet for myself. 

 

After that I borrowed a 60mm 800mm Tasco 9F telescope from a school friend who didn't really care much for astronomy or the scope but that was a real jump for me!  The next step up was a home made 8 inch f6 reflector on a Dob mount which my folks generously gave to me one Christmas.  I was only thirteen years old then but I still use that scope to this day.  The feeling of being thirteen again always embraces me each time I take that reflector outside.

 

So all in all I'd say yes, one does have to be mindful of the instrument one decides to purchase because there really are some questionable products out there but also remember that even the oddest little scopes, like that "Petrel" draw scope which now has pride of place on my collectables shelf, even an instrument like that can be the key that unlocks the door to a lifelong passion for the night sky. 


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#66 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 05 December 2019 - 08:07 AM

Although it makes me feel somewhat ashamed then to admit that the first telescope I ever had the privilege of using was an old draw scope which belonged to my Dad.  I roped a few broom handles together for a makeshift tripod and that was it.  That's the instrument that enabled me to see Saturn for the very first time even though the view I was afforded through that particular scope was nothing more than an odd shaped ball.  Still, I can remember the sheer excitement I felt when I found the beautiful ringed planet for myself.

 

 

:goodjob:

 

That is a great story.

 

Reading this thread, it seems we all must have started out with Hobby Killers...

 

Who started out with a non-hobby killer???

 

My own thinking is that if a telescope can kill this hobby for you, this ain't the hobby for you.  Or more correctly, you ain't for this hobby.  

 

Jon


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#67 rolo

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Posted 05 December 2019 - 08:08 AM

If you really have a love for the hobby even a 60mm scope is a treasure. My sorry 60mm X 700mm alt-az Jason with them sorry eyepieces showed my the great red spot and my first transit of Ganymede! I was so amazed about the transit that I carried that scope 2 blocks to show my best friend Johnny the transit. My first ever view of Jupiter was on Christmas eve, I believe I was 11 or 12 and I found it by mistake. It was the brightes star in the eastern sky so it caught my attention. A short time after that, another bright object folliwing Jupiter's lead, low and behold it was Saturn! I was just speecjless! The most beatiful sight I've ever seen! That experience and what I felt hasn't been equaled in 45 years of observing. At the time, that sorry scope that cost my parents $75 brand new from Service Merchandise was the best scope in the world to me. At the time 75 bucks was a big deal for them. Both working two jobs to give my brother and I a better life than we had in Cuba. The memories, emotions and sentimental value of that 60mm scope is priceless.smile.gif


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#68 jgraham

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Posted 05 December 2019 - 09:48 AM

A common thread, even with the S&T article's author, is that my first scope was not good (I'm being kind here) and I either loved it or hated it, but it got my foot in the door and I moved on. That's the value of these scope, prit' near any of these scope, is that they offer an affordable entry point.

 

I have been teaching (among other things) astrophotography for nearly 40 years and I see the same thing over and over again. One of the most common questions is what should I buy? People see these wonderful pictures and amazing equipment and they think that the right question is what do I buy so that I can do this? The right question is not what do I buy, but where do I start? Be it a telescope or a camera, you can spend all the money in the world and be worse off that where you started because you have no idea what you're getting yourself into. The right thing to do is to start at the beginning, get smart, learn the basics, learn what works for you, what doesn't, and what your are really interested in. After that, you follow your nose. Your path is your own, you will find your own way and do things the way you do them. But you gotta start somewhere. On the astrophotography side I always suggest starting with what you have; don't but anything unless you absolutely have to. The #1 thing you need is experience, and no amount of money can buy that.

 

Telescopes are the same way; you gotta start somewhere. Sure, if someone is starting out from scratch and we can make suggestions, but only the individual can deice for themselves what looks attractive for them in terms of their perception, interests, and budget. Once they take that first step they get smart real quick in terms of what works, what doesn't and where they want to got. I have never, ever, ever encountered someone who made a decision whether to pursue something based on their first experience. They started with an interest, and if the interest runs deep they keep trying until they find their path. I simply do not believe in any sort of 'hobby killer' and I really don't care what the hobby is. There is only those first few tentative steps where I have moved from thinking that I am interested in something to acting on those interests. One of my greatest joys in this hobby is interacting (I hate to use the word helping, whether or not I'm helpful is not for me to say) with people taking those first few steps. I particularly enjoy showing someone who is struggling with their first purchase how to get their bearings, start at the beginning, and to grow from there.

 

...falling off soap box... it was too wibbly wobbly anyway. :)

 

Enjoy!


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#69 SkyRanger

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Posted 05 December 2019 - 10:46 AM

I started more than 50 years ago with the same kind of wobbly scope most of us did. Mine was an approximately 3” Newt on a mount made of partially hardened Jello.

I was grateful for that scope then, and I am still grateful for it now.

I read everything by Patrick Moore I could get my hands on, became a founding member of the Corpus Christi Astronomical Society, and began saving my lawn mowing money for an Edmund’s 6” mirror kit. Once i got the kit it took me a year to complete the scope.

I have no comments on the article, but I think we may be forgetting an important fact: we are the survivors of the wobbly scopes. Many who had a Jello Mount were discouraged, and a flame that could have been fueled was put out. If beginner scopes were a little better and had more honest advertising on the boxes, maybe this would be a large hobby instead of a tiny one.

Gordon G

Edited by SkyRanger, 05 December 2019 - 10:47 AM.

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#70 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 05 December 2019 - 11:05 AM

I have no comments on the article, but I think we may be forgetting an important fact: we are the survivors of the wobbly scopes. Many who had a Jello Mount were discouraged, and a flame that could have been fueled was put out. If beginner scopes were a little better and had more honest advertising on the boxes, maybe this would be a large hobby instead of a tiny one.

 

 

I don't think so. 

 

I like your choice of words, they're perfect: "We are survivors."  Yes we are.

 

One cannot be an amateur astronomer without being a survivor. A wobbly mount is but the first of many challenges an amateur astronomer faces. 

 

Jon


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#71 SkyRanger

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Posted 05 December 2019 - 11:21 AM

a larger one then!

GG
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#72 rolo

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Posted 06 December 2019 - 08:13 AM

Here's some of the hobby killing junk the author is referring to.Typical 60mm scope accessories that if replaced with better quality .965 or 1.25 can make a world of difference!

Attached Thumbnails

  • junk.jpg

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#73 Rich (RLTYS)

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Posted 06 December 2019 - 08:19 AM

I like the SR4mm eyepiece, can you see anything thru it? That lens is tiny.



#74 rolo

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Posted 06 December 2019 - 08:49 AM

They do work but sometimes make it very difficult to observe with.



#75 Marc-Andre

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Posted 06 December 2019 - 04:07 PM

Christmas 1965; this is a nostalgic replacement for the one I got.  First light waited a few days for the sky to clear.  Not knowing the sky, I brought it to bear on the bright object above the eastern horizon and saw Jovian cloud bands and all four Galilean moons. 

 

DSC01458.JPG

 

DSC01461.JPG

 

DSC01459.JPG

 

DSC02863.JPG


Edited by Marc-Andre, 06 December 2019 - 04:11 PM.

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