Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

S&T Hobby Killers identified!

  • Please log in to reply
195 replies to this topic

#151 oldmanastro

oldmanastro

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 533
  • Joined: 17 Nov 2013
  • Loc: San Juan, Puerto Rico-US

Posted 08 February 2020 - 10:30 PM

I was an eyes-only sky gazer till my 30s. If a scope is lousy, and someone quits because of that, they probably weren't all that interested. What about the scores of people who have saved and scrimped for their first scope, or spent months grinding their first mirror from mail order? A hobby of any sort starts with a keen curiosity, a bit of obsession and perseverance.

Cheap or small scopes are not the hobby killers. Anyone who is truly interested in astronomy will find a way.
Light pollution would have a far greater effect on the current generation. How can they develop an interest at all if they can't see?

This sentence says it all. Interest is the main driver and the reason why some of us that have been in this avocation for close to 55 years are still at it. A simple small telescope was not a hobby killer for us because our interest surpassed the shortcomings of the telescope. Obsession and perseverance ran high too. I remember waking up sometime near 4:00am to see Saturn for the first time in my life through the 60mm f/11 with .965" eyepieces. To me it was breathtaking. Later on at school I kept yawning all day but it was worth it. Most of us had similar experiences.


  • Vesper818, Pete W, Terra Nova and 2 others like this

#152 oldmanastro

oldmanastro

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 533
  • Joined: 17 Nov 2013
  • Loc: San Juan, Puerto Rico-US

Posted 08 February 2020 - 10:36 PM

Here's a picture of Jupiter and Ganymede taken through a 50mm achromat, the Galileoscope. All of the detail seen here is visible to the eye, if a little darker. I would call that of some use.

Excellent image! I'll try it with my Galileoscope. That plastic telescope has pretty good optics and I can mount it piggyback in my Mak. The fact is that I remember Unitron 1.6" telescopes in their catalogs. A lot of people started with these scopes.



#153 Jon Isaacs

Jon Isaacs

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 86,658
  • Joined: 16 Jun 2004
  • Loc: San Diego and Boulevard, CA

Posted 08 February 2020 - 11:55 PM

I have never been able to get comfortable using an RACI optical finder. I’ve had several and sold them, they just don’t work well for me. If I’m going to use an optical finder it’s a straight-thru, although I do have a couple of correct image straight-thru optical finders that I like.

 

 

I used to only use straight through finders but about 6 years ago, I decided to make the switch to RACI finders. Part of the motivation was that with my big scopes, the finder and the main eyepiece could be side by side so it would be easier to work back and forth between them.

 

It took a while before I had it down, I was always moving the scope the wrong way. Today, i only use RACI finders. On my bigger scopes, there's always a Telrad. 

 

Having the finder and main eyepiece side by side works really well.

 

StellarVue finder on 22 inch.jpg
 
Jon

  • Pete W, Augustus and Steve Allison like this

#154 CHASLX200

CHASLX200

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 20,366
  • Joined: 29 Sep 2007
  • Loc: Tampa area Florida

Posted 09 February 2020 - 07:37 AM

Neither have I. It has always been straight through finders with me. I tried a RACI finder once in a star party. It was a difficult thing. I need to see directly at the object with one eye and through the finder with the other eye. 

At some point finders in Towa telescope and others underwent a de-evolution. For example, my old 1965 altazimuth mounted 60mm f/11 Sears (Towa) has a 5X24 achromatic finder. It is pretty good. Later on this same telescope model came with a non-achromatic finder with a mask that reduced the aperture almost by a half. It was useless. A bad cost saving measure. The 6X30 finder in the Sears model 6305-A is a good one and so is the 12X40 (if I am not incorrect) of the Sears 76mm f/16. I am neither much of a fan when it comes to zero power laser finders. 

I also don't like RACI finders as i always move the scope the wrong way.



#155 Jon Isaacs

Jon Isaacs

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 86,658
  • Joined: 16 Jun 2004
  • Loc: San Diego and Boulevard, CA

Posted 09 February 2020 - 09:59 AM

I also don't like RACI finders as i always move the scope the wrong way.

 

Even old dogs can learn new tricks, I did. It probably took a year before I always moved the scope the right way. 

 

Jon



#156 Bonco2

Bonco2

    Messenger

  • *****
  • Posts: 471
  • Joined: 01 Jun 2013

Posted 09 February 2020 - 05:19 PM

This old man is tired of new tricks...No RACI for me.lol.gif

Bill


  • Terra Nova likes this

#157 Terra Nova

Terra Nova

    ISS

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 23,050
  • Joined: 29 May 2012
  • Loc: Northern Kentucky

Posted 09 February 2020 - 05:32 PM

 

I used to only use straight through finders but about 6 years ago, I decided to make the switch to RACI finders. Part of the motivation was that with my big scopes, the finder and the main eyepiece could be side by side so it would be easier to work back and forth between them.

 

It took a while before I had it down, I was always moving the scope the wrong way. Today, i only use RACI finders. On my bigger scopes, there's always a Telrad. 

 

Having the finder and main eyepiece side by side works really well.

 

 
 
Jon

 

Well it’s kind of cheating when you’re using it in conjunction with the Telrad. In that case, the Telrad is really the finder, you do the real work with it. The RACI is just a little correct image wide field telescope used to zoom in on the target for the bigger narrow field telescope. You did all the real pointing with the Telrad. 



#158 Jon Isaacs

Jon Isaacs

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 86,658
  • Joined: 16 Jun 2004
  • Loc: San Diego and Boulevard, CA

Posted 09 February 2020 - 05:38 PM

This old man is tired of new tricks...No RACI for me.lol.gif

Bill

 

I'm glad I made the change. It really simplifies star hopping and is much more comfortable, particularly when observing from a ladder.  The driving force was probably when I got the 25 inch F/5, less leaning off the ladder with an RACI finder. With a big scope, I find I spend a lot of time with the finder, objects are faint, the main scope has a narrow field, precise pointing is required.

 

We all do it our own way.

 

Jon


  • Terra Nova and oldmanastro like this

#159 ccwemyss

ccwemyss

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,176
  • Joined: 11 Aug 2016
  • Loc: Massachusetts

Posted 09 February 2020 - 07:18 PM

Are we now arguing about whether RACI is a hobby killer?

 

I would think that neck pain resulting from trying to find near-zenith objects with the straight finders on inexpensive refractors, most of which had fairly short tripods (or were unstable with their legs extended), would be more of a hobby killer. I certainly feel it the next day.

 

On my 9TE-5, I know that I hated the finder. The one on my 4.25" Edmund was much better. Even though it was straight, being at the front of the scope, it was far easier to access.

 

Chip W. 



#160 clamchip

clamchip

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 10,809
  • Joined: 09 Aug 2008
  • Loc: Seattle

Posted 09 February 2020 - 08:12 PM

Having too many hobbies can be a hobby killer.

When I first became interested in astronomy mid sixties I was also interested in, radio/electronics

shortwave listening, fossils, rocks & minerals, insect collecting, stamp and coin collecting.

Once I got my first scope in 1966 and 'my space' was not just the backyard but the entire universe

it pretty much killed all my other hobbies.

It happened again around 2008, a co-worker's dad passed away and he was cleaning out

the basement and sold me all his dad's Edmund Scientific telescopes and parts.

I was interested in astronomy at the time but the Edmund treasure killed my interest in classic

motorcycles, model airplanes, antique hit & miss gas engines, now I spent all my available spare

time (and then some) on astronomy.

 

Robert


  • Bonco2, oldmanastro and Senex Bibax like this

#161 oldmanastro

oldmanastro

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 533
  • Joined: 17 Nov 2013
  • Loc: San Juan, Puerto Rico-US

Posted 09 February 2020 - 09:51 PM

Talking about interest and perseverance, here is a little story. Back in November 12, 1966 there was a Solar eclipse. I could see it partially from here and I mean very partially but it was my first eclipse. I had to see it. One problem though. It was a Saturday and on every Saturday at that time I accompanied my dad in his business visits. He had a small clothing and linen business that he ran out of a 1964 Ford Cortina MKI and Saturdays were very busy days. I helped him out and, of course, I was not going to say no because I want to see an eclipse. Neither could I carry my 60mm f/11 with me. I was afraid to damage the scope. That little car was stuffed with the merchandise. So I took another telescope. That year I had save some $ to buy a little Tasco terrestrial telescope called Comet if I remember well. It was a small 30mm telescope with a leather case and a small tripod. What I did may sound crazy today but allowed me to see and record the eclipse during our stops. You all remember the maligned sun eyepiece filter? Well, I taped one to the eyepiece of the little tasco, took some paper with me and recorded what I could by placing the telescope on the car roof. It had small rubber inserts in the tripod legs that gave it some steadiness. Those Saturdays were long. We started at 7:00am and were still at it at 7:00pm. The record of that little partial eclipse was lost a long time ago but the telescope is still here. I remembered this eclipse sometime ago and searched for the date. It coincided with a Saturday so bingo because those were the days I went out with dad. Here is the Comet now missing the rubber inserts but still working for occasional terrestrial use. The case is undergoing TLC. This 30mm didn't kill the hobby either. No, I haven't placed that solar filter in the eyepiece again since then.

 

Sorry for the long writeup. It's such a nice memory that I get carried away.

 

Clear Skies!

 

Guido

Attached Thumbnails

  • Tasco30.JPG

  • Jon Isaacs, Vesper818, cuzimthedad and 8 others like this

#162 oldmanastro

oldmanastro

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 533
  • Joined: 17 Nov 2013
  • Loc: San Juan, Puerto Rico-US

Posted 09 February 2020 - 09:53 PM

Having too many hobbies can be a hobby killer.

When I first became interested in astronomy mid sixties I was also interested in, radio/electronics

shortwave listening, fossils, rocks & minerals, insect collecting, stamp and coin collecting.

Once I got my first scope in 1966 and 'my space' was not just the backyard but the entire universe

it pretty much killed all my other hobbies.

It happened again around 2008, a co-worker's dad passed away and he was cleaning out

the basement and sold me all his dad's Edmund Scientific telescopes and parts.

I was interested in astronomy at the time but the Edmund treasure killed my interest in classic

motorcycles, model airplanes, antique hit & miss gas engines, now I spent all my available spare

time (and then some) on astronomy.

 

Robert

Many of us are also shortwave radio enthusiasts and on cloudy nights you may find me doing some shortwave listening. 


  • clamchip likes this

#163 Terra Nova

Terra Nova

    ISS

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 23,050
  • Joined: 29 May 2012
  • Loc: Northern Kentucky

Posted 09 February 2020 - 10:48 PM

Are we now arguing about whether RACI is a hobby killer?

 

I would think that neck pain resulting from trying to find near-zenith objects with the straight finders on inexpensive refractors, most of which had fairly short tripods (or were unstable with their legs extended), would be more of a hobby killer. I certainly feel it the next day.

 

On my 9TE-5, I know that I hated the finder. The one on my 4.25" Edmund was much better. Even though it was straight, being at the front of the scope, it was far easier to access.

 

Chip W. 

I don’t think so! If you go back to the first part of that part of this thread, we were discussing (not arguing) that the contortions we got ourselves into to find high objects were much easier when we were young (long telescopes and straight thru finders) and I said that could kill the hobby now (not being serious) and that nowadays a GLP worked much better for me. And then I remarked thar RACIFs never really did it for me.

 

See post 144 and 145.

 

Then the arc just veered into a discussion of the merits of different kinds of finders. It had nothing to do with any finders being hobby killers. :lol:


Edited by Terra Nova, 09 February 2020 - 10:52 PM.


#164 Senex Bibax

Senex Bibax

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 537
  • Joined: 01 Feb 2019
  • Loc: Ottawa, ON

Posted 10 February 2020 - 07:43 AM

Astronomy gives me a hobby for the five months of the year when it's too cold for classic two-wheelers - except when it's too cold to observe. That leaves music as my fall-back, when I'm not too busy overhauling scopes and mounts.

 

Having too many hobbies can be a hobby killer.

When I first became interested in astronomy mid sixties I was also interested in, radio/electronics

shortwave listening, fossils, rocks & minerals, insect collecting, stamp and coin collecting.

Once I got my first scope in 1966 and 'my space' was not just the backyard but the entire universe

it pretty much killed all my other hobbies.

It happened again around 2008, a co-worker's dad passed away and he was cleaning out

the basement and sold me all his dad's Edmund Scientific telescopes and parts.

I was interested in astronomy at the time but the Edmund treasure killed my interest in classic

motorcycles, model airplanes, antique hit & miss gas engines, now I spent all my available spare

time (and then some) on astronomy.

 

Robert



#165 CHASLX200

CHASLX200

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 20,366
  • Joined: 29 Sep 2007
  • Loc: Tampa area Florida

Posted 10 February 2020 - 07:13 PM

I don’t think so! If you go back to the first part of that part of this thread, we were discussing (not arguing) that the contortions we got ourselves into to find high objects were much easier when we were young (long telescopes and straight thru finders) and I said that could kill the hobby now (not being serious) and that nowadays a GLP worked much better for me. And then I remarked thar RACIFs never really did it for me.

 

See post 144 and 145.

 

Then the arc just veered into a discussion of the merits of different kinds of finders. It had nothing to do with any finders being hobby killers. lol.gif

Some finders were sure neck killers.  I always found the little 5X24 on the older C5's a pain. So maybe some finders did help with killing the hobby for some peeps.


  • Terra Nova likes this

#166 Terra Nova

Terra Nova

    ISS

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 23,050
  • Joined: 29 May 2012
  • Loc: Northern Kentucky

Posted 11 February 2020 - 11:15 AM

Some finders were sure neck killers.  I always found the little 5X24 on the older C5's a pain. So maybe some finders did help with killing the hobby for some peeps.

I think anyone with serious interest would work around it. Back in the day, we didn’t have a lot of choice. So we just stuck with it and allowed for the occasional stiff neck or charley-horse. Now, anyone can get a Telrad and mount it with the included two sided adhesive tape or with zip-ties. I always recommend Telrads to beginners, and for them to use it in conjunction with a pair of binoculars and a simple atlas. I think they are the absolute easiest finder there is to use and they really encourage the user to star hop and learn the sky. 



#167 Jon Isaacs

Jon Isaacs

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 86,658
  • Joined: 16 Jun 2004
  • Loc: San Diego and Boulevard, CA

Posted 11 February 2020 - 11:25 AM

Guido:

 

Love your story. It's stories like that make this forum extra special.

 

Jon


  • Vesper818 and oldmanastro like this

#168 ldcarson

ldcarson

    Explorer 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 79
  • Joined: 15 Feb 2019

Posted 11 February 2020 - 12:46 PM

I don't know if its a hobby killer but clouds and monsoon season sure is killing me and my desire to setup and shoot the southern hemisphere.    



#169 oldmanastro

oldmanastro

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 533
  • Joined: 17 Nov 2013
  • Loc: San Juan, Puerto Rico-US

Posted 11 February 2020 - 09:45 PM

Guido:

 

Love your story. It's stories like that make this forum extra special.

 

Jon

Thanks Jon. This story brings back very nice memories of my beginnings in astronomy and those Saturdays with dad. I was 13 at that time.

 

Clear Skies!

 

Guido


  • Jon Isaacs likes this

#170 Terra Nova

Terra Nova

    ISS

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 23,050
  • Joined: 29 May 2012
  • Loc: Northern Kentucky

Posted 11 February 2020 - 11:23 PM

Talking about interest and perseverance, here is a little story. Back in November 12, 1966 there was a Solar eclipse. I could see it partially from here and I mean very partially but it was my first eclipse. I had to see it. One problem though. It was a Saturday and on every Saturday at that time I accompanied my dad in his business visits. He had a small clothing and linen business that he ran out of a 1964 Ford Cortina MKI and Saturdays were very busy days. I helped him out and, of course, I was not going to say no because I want to see an eclipse. Neither could I carry my 60mm f/11 with me. I was afraid to damage the scope. That little car was stuffed with the merchandise. So I took another telescope. That year I had save some $ to buy a little Tasco terrestrial telescope called Comet if I remember well. It was a small 30mm telescope with a leather case and a small tripod. What I did may sound crazy today but allowed me to see and record the eclipse during our stops. You all remember the maligned sun eyepiece filter? Well, I taped one to the eyepiece of the little tasco, took some paper with me and recorded what I could by placing the telescope on the car roof. It had small rubber inserts in the tripod legs that gave it some steadiness. Those Saturdays were long. We started at 7:00am and were still at it at 7:00pm. The record of that little partial eclipse was lost a long time ago but the telescope is still here. I remembered this eclipse sometime ago and searched for the date. It coincided with a Saturday so bingo because those were the days I went out with dad. Here is the Comet now missing the rubber inserts but still working for occasional terrestrial use. The case is undergoing TLC. This 30mm didn't kill the hobby either. No, I haven't placed that solar filter in the eyepiece again since then.
 
Sorry for the long writeup. It's such a nice memory that I get carried away.
 
Clear Skies!
 
Guido


Great story! That little scope looks just like the one Beaver Cleaver had! Here it is in the Episode titled Beaver’s Tonsils (Season 4, episode 20 of Leave It To Beaver). This episode was first broadcast February 11, 1961 which is coincidentally 59 years ago today! I saw it first run. Gawd I feel old!!

Attached Thumbnails

  • 5CF6345D-5C43-4AE6-97EE-C1E347DC34EF.jpeg

  • Jon Isaacs, oldmanastro, Kasmos and 4 others like this

#171 oldmanastro

oldmanastro

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 533
  • Joined: 17 Nov 2013
  • Loc: San Juan, Puerto Rico-US

Posted 12 February 2020 - 01:37 PM

Great story! That little scope looks just like the one Beaver Cleaver had! Here it is in the Episode titled Beaver’s Tonsils (Season 4, episode 20 of Leave It To Beaver). This episode was first broadcast February 11, 1961 which is coincidentally 59 years ago today! I saw it first run. Gawd I feel old!!

My wife and I love to watch reruns of Leave it to Beaver. One thing is for sure. The Beaver cannot focus that telescope without pulling out the rest of the focusing tubes. These Tasco 30mm came in two versions a 25X30 and a 30x30. They have very good optics and smooth sliding in the focusing telescopic tubes. The original case has a reddish velvet interior.

 

The report of that November 66 eclipse made its way to the Royal Astronomical Society of Stockton CA. A bunch of kids, some my age and some older, had formed this society. They asked for members in a small note in the Review of Popular Astronomy, I wrote them and they were thrilled of receiving a letter from so far away. I became a member and corresponded with some of them for some years. Later on I don't know what happened to the Society. I may have a group photo that they sent me.

 

Guido


  • Jon Isaacs and Terra Nova like this

#172 MisterDan

MisterDan

    Lift Off

  • *****
  • Posts: 24
  • Joined: 20 Jun 2014
  • Loc: Colorado

Posted 08 August 2020 - 12:09 AM

 

Indeed! I actually probably started with the WORST telescope - a 40mm reflector that had a PLASTIC SQUARE secondary that had some reflective tape for a mirror on it. But like you, that showed me the moons of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, many craters on the Moon and it ignited a passion for astronomy in me that burns 40 years later.

 

 
 
Cheers!

Rick

 

Rick, I had the Skilcraft Satellite version of this 40mm mutant Newtonian (mu-tonian?). I didn't even KNOW there was a 100x version with a rack-&-pinion focuser!  Yours was obviously a rare "premium-grade" version.wink.gif  Mine (late '70s) had a twist/push/pull "focuser" lined with green felt. Secondary, if I'm recalling correctly, was a second-surface rectangular glass mirror. I've seen another Satellite with a FIRST-surface rectangular secondary. -And yours had a plastic silver-tape surfaced secondary?! Wow. The mind wobbles. Mine had a "steel" tripod with a ball-&-socket "head." After the wee steel pin holding the head to the tripod finally gave up, I built an equatorial fork-on-pedestal mount for it, using scrap 2x4s, 2x2s, and box nails. With the 40x & 80x eyepieces (one Ramsden, one Huygens), I managed ultra-low-contrast views of the SEB on Jupiter (almost imaginary, it was so subtle), a single-ringed Saturn, the core of M42, and a barely-there wisp of the Great Cluster. Luna, however, was much "easier" and provided countless kicks in the pants.

 

I was lucky to have spent MANY hours on the roof of our house, with a pair of Bell & Howell 8x40s, for a few years prior to receiving the Skilcraft (as a birthday gift), and likely just as many hours in bed or a chair, devouring the original Petersen's Field Guide by Menzel. When I got the tiny long-focus Newt, I knew it wouldn't rival an Edmund 6-incher, or a Celestron 8, but I was determined to squeeze as much satisfaction out of the mu-tonian as I possibly could.

 

And I did.

 

Hobby killer? Heck no. A kid's first (and last) night with a poor telescope can't kill what isn't yet alive. "Hobbies" are borne of knowledge, practice, and experience. The worst things a poor scope can do is provide a learning experience and perhaps trigger some regret at spending some money. If there's more "damage," perhaps it's not quite the scope's fault.

 

I still have a Skilcraft Satellite - a strictly nostalgic purchase many years after my first one was dissected (I just HAD to see that primary up close!) and discarded.

 

My views through my Jason 307 Explorer, on the other hand, are quite nice (even when stopped down to 40mm). That's another story, though.

 

Cheers and good seeing.

Dan



#173 hypergolic

hypergolic

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 319
  • Joined: 27 Nov 2007
  • Loc: Richmond Hill, Georgia

Posted 09 August 2020 - 08:55 PM

I had one similar to this, but I think it was a 3" from Sears. The focuser and diagonal holder were black plastic.

 

sheet steel U shaped channel legs with a ball joint head. 

 

attachicon.gifpost-50896-14074277746471_thumb.jpg



#174 RichA

RichA

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,214
  • Joined: 03 Jun 2010
  • Loc: Toronto, Canada

Posted 10 August 2020 - 08:59 AM

Apparently, if one is to believe all that we hear about "hobby killers":

 

Gone are the days when a determined youngster is capable of squeezing the sweetest celestial nectar out of a less-than-3-inch refractor on a wobbly mount and tripod.

 

Gone are the days when a .965-inch eyepiece (or a Ramsden, or a Kellner, etc.) can show anything of value.

 

Gone are the days when observing the moon, all by itself, is sufficient to hook one on a lifetime hobby.

 

So where are we today?

 

Today a beginner has to have aperture.  Today he/she has to be able to observe deep-sky objects, in detail (whatever that means to the beginner), with inexperienced eyes, under city lights.  Today the bright (and easy to see) objects are nuisances, not worthy of telescopic study.  Today one must have better optics.  Today one must have sturdier tripods and/or mounts.  Today a beginner cannot be expected to know anything about astronomy, observing, telescope optics, mounts, etc.  If it doesn't work perfectly, without any tweaking, right out of the box, then it's nothing more than a worthless piece of junk.

 

Some of us started out with a telescope that was far worse than any of those "hobby killers"  I'll not repeat here what my first telescope was like, but trust me, it was inferior to those in the "hobby killer" article.  Telescopes are not "hobby killers".

 

If a beginning astronomer hasn't read (extensively) about how telescopes work, how to use a telescope, what the views through any given telescope can be expected to be like, etc.  Then I would have to wonder if they really have enough interest to be deserving of that first telescope -- regardless of how good or bad that telescope might be.  It's the individuals who lack interest that kill the hobby for themselves -- individuals who were never really into the hobby to begin with.

 

The determined, interested individual will not be defeated by a mere telescope -- no matter how poorly made that telescope might be.

 

It's the kid who lacks interest, lacks motivation, lacks basic hobby-related knowledge and curiosity who will most likely be turned off by their first telescope; and it wouldn't matter if that first telescope were a Takahashi on an Astro-Physics mount or a 50mm department-store achromat on a wobbly tripod.

 

Some people have the aptitude and interest.  But most don't.

 

Dark skies are not necessary -- unless one harbors unrealistic expectations concerning DSOs; but even with dark skies, some will be disappointed in their views.  The potential beginner who's done their "homework" (which won't really be "work" for the interested and motivated individual) will have a reasonable idea of what their telescopic views might be like.  They will likely not be disappointed -- regardless of the telescope.

The truth is that people who gave up after trying to use a 60mm and never progressed from there were never truly interested in the hobby anyway.  To real enthusiasts an unresolved puff-ball that's a global cluster in a 60mm is interesting, having found it, an accomplishment.  To the average person and in some cases average observer, they aren't worth pursuing.   


  • CharlieB, Bomber Bob and oldmanastro like this

#175 CharlieB

CharlieB

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 5,222
  • Joined: 11 Dec 2007
  • Loc: Southern NH

Posted 10 August 2020 - 10:25 AM

My most-used scopes have 40 and 50mm objectives (with an occasional foray into 60mm and larger ones) .  My most-used eyepieces are .965" orthoscopic, Kellener and Huygens.  These scopes will never give the same views as larger scopes, but those larger scopes pale in comparison with even larger scopes.  There is no end to it.

 

I have a rather ridiculous number of small scopes and none have been hobby killers.  Wallet killers - perhaps.

 

Charlie


  • Chuck Hards, Terra Nova, PawPaw and 3 others like this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics