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Non-BBT books?

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#1 starquake

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Posted 30 November 2019 - 03:40 PM

Hello, could you recommend any alternate cosmology books? I have some from Hoyle, Arp, Narlikar, etc. but they are mostly pro-steady state or steady state offsprings. I know most non-big bang theories are no longer considered as a valid alternative, but I enjoy reading about cosmology theories even if they are completely wrong based on our present knowledge. Are there any more exotic theories with a scientific (non-religious) background, worth reading about?

Thanks!

#2 StrStrck

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Posted 30 November 2019 - 04:17 PM

“Something Deeply Hidden” by Sean Carroll, great as audio book, I get a daily dose of quantum physics and more going to and from work. Would like to have the book-book, though, so I could see the diagrams.



#3 jpcampbell

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Posted 30 November 2019 - 05:13 PM

Eric Lerner's "The Big Bang Never Happened".

 

Lerner is a plasma physicist and advocate of plasma cosmology, which assumes that astrophysical plasmas play the major role in the the structure of the universe at all scales. He comes from a line of physicists going back to 1970 Nobel Prize Laureate Hannes Alfven and Los Alamos physicist Anthony Peratt.

 

Tom Van Flandern's "Dark Matter, Missing Planets and New Comets: Paradoxes Resolved".

 

Van Flandern was Chief of the Celestial Mechanics Branch of the Nautical Almanac Office.

 

https://en.wikipedia...om_Van_Flandern

 

Hilton Ratcliffe's "The Static Universe" provides an overview of various BBT critiques and alternative cosmologies.

 

It seems that most alternative cosmologies (so-called "non-standard" cosmologies) have one thing in common - they assume you can't get something from nothing, or even everything from nothing. Most take it as a given that there was always something and will always be something - a universe infinite in extent, of unknown point of origin in time, and without boundaries.


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#4 BradFran

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Posted 01 December 2019 - 09:49 AM

An interesting alternative view was held by none other than John Dobson, presented in two books:

 

Beyond Space and Time (2004)

The Moon Is New: Time Comes In With A Minus Sign (2008)

 

I've had them on my reading list for awhile and still think back to his conversational points from time to time. They might be just what you're looking for.


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#5 Todd N

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Posted 01 December 2019 - 05:26 PM

Cycles of Time by Roger Penrose. I haven't read it but I have listened to a presentation or two about his theory of Conformal Cyclic Cosmology, repeated cycles of Big Bangs. 



#6 starquake

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Posted 02 December 2019 - 03:28 PM

Wow, thank you for your replies (I was expecting a little flame-war ;) ). I'll try to get these books.

#7 helpwanted

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Posted 04 December 2019 - 09:14 AM

Google Halton Arp, the same Arp that the Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies book is about. He was a critic of the Big Bang Theory and wrote two books that were (still are) controversial in that he disputed red shifts being interpreted as long distances.


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#8 starquake

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Posted 04 December 2019 - 11:04 AM

Thank you, I already have books from Arp, Hoyle, Narlikar, the Burbridges, and so on, actually his Seeing Red was the book that triggered my interest towards non-standard cosmologies. (More precisely it was High energy astrophysics, which is a transcript of a seminar on this topic where Arp was one of the speakers, and made me look up Seeing Red).

 

From his cosmology related books I already have:

 

Seeing Red: Redshifts, Cosmology and Academic Science
Catalogue of Discordant Redshift Associations
High Energy Astrophysics

 

But still missing (because they are out of my price range now):

 

The Redshift Controversy
Quasars, Redshifts and Controversies


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#9 jpcampbell

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Posted 04 December 2019 - 01:12 PM

But still missing (because they are out of my price range now):

 

The Redshift Controversy
Quasars, Redshifts and Controversies

I am currently re-reading "Quasars, Redshifts, and Controversies" and waiting on an order for "The Redshift Controversy". Should have it in a week or so, but it's available on loaner here:

https://archive.org/...ontrove0000fiel

 

If you've read "Seeing Red", then you really should pick up "Quasars....". I've read them both, but initially read "Seeing Red" first and then "Quasars...". Now I'm re-reading them in order. These books are dense, but provide so much insight into his process as an old-school observer. They don't make them like Arp anymore! I've learned a lot from these books and "The Catalogue of Discordant Redshift Associations". I've also read a few of his papers going back to the late '60s. Such an important period in the history of astronomy.



#10 helpwanted

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Posted 04 December 2019 - 01:37 PM

starquake, i saw that you mentioned Arp in your original post... but after i posted my reply!




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