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#1 mikenoname

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Posted 20 November 2019 - 12:27 AM

I am reading intro to photography posts here on CN.   It requires more assets than the Bank of America.  But hard to resist dipping in.  I drool with envy at any of the "amateur" photos I see.  I realize they require moon shot tech and financing...yikes. 

 

No they don't. Since you are posting in the EAA sub forum, I'm assuming you realize the differences between EAA and astrophotography. Using short subs and modern stacking technology you can get some really great images with surprisingly inexpensive equipment (at least relative to astrophotography). Scroll up to post number 64 above and see how much Corey's system costed. And having seen a number of his YouTube videos of his live streams, I can tell you he gets some pretty nice images.

 

My system, like the rest of my life, is pretty darn modest as well. Because I made my own tripod out of scrap scrap 2x3s and some furniture-grade plywood, I was able to get the price of my entire set up down to even less than Corey's.

 

Imaging Setup 130_SLTs.jpg

 

And here is an image I got last night with it of Triangulum. Certainly not as nice as a multi-hour AP marathon, but costs 15% what an eVscope costs and involves zero hours of post processing. And is just plain fun.

 

Stack_160frames_640s.jpg


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#2 mikenoname

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Posted 20 November 2019 - 12:49 AM

Finally that pesky moon calms down a little and I can get the rest.

 

Stack_150frames_600s.jpg

 

Stack_150frames_600s.jpg

 

Stack_150frames_600s.jpg

 

Stack_150frames_600s.jpg

 

And for 604 I figured I would be generous and just throw in most of Triangulum too for the same price. smile.gif

 

Stack_160frames_640s.jpg


Edited by mikenoname, 20 November 2019 - 12:56 AM.

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#3 GaryShaw

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Posted 30 November 2019 - 12:17 PM

Ok, its 11/30 and my homework on the Roel November Challenge is due......

 

Unfortunately, my assignment is very incomplete - a shameful first submission to this honorable observing challenge. If this were a school assignment, I'd offer the old excuse from my childhood: "my dog ate my homework.." but, I'm not in school and my only excuses are the lack of: 1) clear skies, 2) time and, most importantly- 3) aperture. 

 

I'm submitting only 2 of the 7 challenge objects. I did manage to 'barely see' several others but could not get a decent image to submit. The magnitude 12,13 and 14 objects are faint wisps on my screen - possibly beyond my capabilities as an observer and beyond the limits of my humble 142mm newtonian scope.

 

Anyway Roel, I totally enjoyed the quest and will try to do better on future challenges. I've ordered a TS 200mm UNC F4 scope which may help out on future challenges. Thank you for organizing the Challenge!

Cheers,

Gary

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • RoelChallenge_NGC7479Barred Spiral_Stack_94frames_1410s_WithDisplayStretch.jpg
  • RoelChallengeNGC604Pinwheel_Stack_70frames_808s_WithDisplayStretch.jpg

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#4 DVR06

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Posted 02 December 2019 - 05:30 PM

NGC 7479
80mm f6 ASI-294C (cropped)   40frames X 15sec 

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • NGC 7479-.jpg

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#5 cmooney91

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Posted 04 December 2019 - 07:28 PM

Thank you moderators.

 

 

This a cut and paste reformat of my last post from the old image gallery, to this new gallery where I can show the longer livestacks.

 

 

I recently bought an ASI294MC-Pro on sale, and a SW Quattro Coma Corrector to use with my Bresser 208mm F3.9 Newt.

 

Last night (12/03/2019 9:30 )I got to try it all out under a quarter moon and low hanging hazy skies, not ideal but I'll take what I can get.

 

Skies around me are normally bortle 5

 

I ran the cooler to -10C for dark frame stability, it was only drawing 6%-12%

 

I set a gain of 530 (~85%) and made darks for 4, 8 and 16s.  (in retrospect  I think I should have used a much lower gain due to the bright murky skies.) then i took flats using a tracing tablet.

 

The camera behaved well in SharpCap, (I've been having issues with my RisingCam under directshow)

 

(all photos are resized and compressed for image limits)

 

The first thing I looked at was Andromeda. I was ecstatic to fit M32 and M110 in the same frame. It was really fun to be able to zoom in and out to soak in all of the details around the FOV.

 

M31 4s x 131 = 524s

gallery_280529_12251_85247.jpg

 

I had a bad line of sight for my high gain Wifi antenna, so I was unable to operate remotely. Fortunately I just got a nice down parka, so I was able to comfortably view at the scope side.

 

Next was M33. It was a perfect test for the new camera; massive wide FOV but chock full of details. Again it is awesome to be able to surf around the building image inspecting the details as it grew in clarity.

 

M33 4s x 66 = 264s

gallery_280529_12251_41340.jpg

 

Another great use of the detailed FOV was NGC891 and friends to the SE (I never knew).  I was able to get most in frame and zoom into each as if I were using my smaller 224 sensor.

 

NGC891 and Friends 4s x 146 = 584s

gallery_280529_12251_28657.jpg

 

I also looked at some open clusters, as a good check on the coma corrector.  I looked a NGC457 (ET), the double cluster, NGC7789 and M38. I really like M38 and nearby NCG1907. It's near a great binocular asterism that looks like a 1.5° smiley face.

 

M38 and NGC1907 4s x 84 = 336s

gallery_280529_12251_45321.jpg

 

Nearby was IC405 which I had never seen before. It was very beautiful with a mix of red emission and blue reflection nebula, in a sparse cluster.

 

IC405  8s x 22 =176s

gallery_280529_12251_124393.jpg

 

Not too far away in/near Auriga there was  the comet C/2017 T2 (PANSTARRS)  A short 5 minute stack showed a faint but long tail.

 

C/2017 T2 4s x 92 = 368s

gallery_280529_12251_122776.jpg

 

Last Saturday I did a 1 hour time lapse of C/2017 T2 with my 4.5" F4 and my IMX224. I set up sharpcap to save off the live stack every 5 minutes, and then I animated the resulting frames into a video

https://youtu.be/Gch4ZUj8eE0

 

 

About the time I was getting too cold and thinking about wrapping up, M47 crossed over  the meridian and I had to check it out. It would be a good test for internal reflections and field sharpness of the coma corrector. I was amazed at the nebulosity that the camera pulled through the murky skies.

 

M47 4s x 105 = 420s

gallery_280529_12251_119590.jpg

 

I also shot the Flame+ horsehead,  and then the Orion nebula, but those where shot through floodlit tree limbs and the image suffered greatly.

 

I ended up wrapping up around 1:30AM, Overall I had a blast and I look forward to more favorable conditions.

 

lessons learned:

I think I should have used a much lower gain. At 530 gain and 4s the histogram was well off the left end, 8s put the hump near 50%.

I need to sort out some tilt in an adapter I use to collimate. I rotate the laser, no movement. I rotate the laser plus barlow, no movement. I rotate laser + barlow +adapter, and the dot orbits around.... That or I need to learn to collimate using the camera in place.


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#6 Xilman

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Posted 05 December 2019 - 07:10 AM

My thanks to the mods for setting up this area.  It fills a previously embarrassing gap in CN's coverage in my opinion. The image below did not (again IMO) have a home anywhere else.  It is not "astrophotography" in that it has essentially no artistic merit.  It's the field of a variable star too faint to be measured, so of little interest to the astrophysics crowd, and I don't consider myself to be a beginning imager.  Nonetheless, I believe it worthy of public display.  So, to required details which are taken directly from the FITS headers where given in bold text ...

 

1) DATE-OBS= '2019-11-30T01:28:37' /YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm:ss observation start, UT

 

2) SV Ari and 2MFGC 2808

 

3) EXPTIME =   30.000000000000000 /Exposure time in seconds 

    EXPTIME =   1.210000000000E+03 / Maximum equivalent exposure time (s)

    SOFTNAME= 'SWarp   '           / The software that processed those data

    COMBINET= 'AVERAGE '           / COMBINE_TYPE config parameter for SWarp

    SWCREATE= 'MaxIm DL Version 6.16 160717 20CER' /Name of software

 

   The first EXPTIME is per sub, the next three lines give stacking information and the last the image capturing software.

 

It was taken with a Starlight Xpress SX814 Trius PRO camera cooled to -20C and attached to the 0.4m f/6.5 fork-mounted Dilworth-Relay telescope at Tacande Observatory, The full image is rather large (1847x1524 px, 11MB) so only the relevant portion is displayed here and at only 8 bpp.

 

4) My main astronomical interest is measuring as accurately as possible the brightness of variable stars, especially eruptive and cataclysmic variables. One star on my program is SV Arietis. I've taken the "no post-processing" instruction literally and so have not annotated the image below with the position of  SV Ari or the V-magnitudes of the comparisons. Neither did I remove the cosmic ray hit or a couple of hot pixels.  Just the facts, ma'am. A finder chart is available from the AAVSO. In it SV Ari is documented as varying between mag 14.0 and 22.1 in the Johnson V band, the filter used for this observation.  The faintest star visible on this image is measured as 19.9 +/- 0.4 magnitude.  SV Ari is undoubtedly fainter.

 

Incidentally, I almost always display the images in negative (i.e. black stars on white background) on the computer screen (for ease of comparison with finder charts) and stack the subs as they come in.  The last is used to monitor the SNR of the target and so to stop observing once the photometric precision is good enough.  If the star is still below the detectability limit after a lengthy period I give up.  I trust this is within the domain of "electronically assisted astronomy".

 

This is not the first time I've observed SV Ari but it is the first occasion when I've paid attention to the field galaxy.  As can be seen, it is a rather nice edge-on spiral with a nuclear bulge and a prominent equatorial dust lane.  Hardly anything can be found on the web, little more than a position and a catalogue number: 2MFGC 2808.  My measurement of its integrated V magnitude is 16.46 +/- 0.05 and its dimensions are 23 x 6 arcseconds.

 

If anyone can provide more information, please do!

Attached Thumbnails

  • sv_ari_galaxy.jpg

Edited by Xilman, 05 December 2019 - 07:24 AM.

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#7 Rickster

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Posted 06 December 2019 - 12:35 AM

Well done Corey! 



#8 Forward Scatter

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Posted 06 December 2019 - 01:20 AM

Image Gallery Rules (Unlimited Integration)

 

Image posts in the galleries must include an observing report that contains a minimum of:
1) time and date of the observation (seeing & transparency conditions are optional)
2) name and/or catalog number of the object(s) of interest
3) integration time (seconds/# of frames) and the software/process used for the “live” capture in their text.
4) a discussion of observations that covers what was seen, anything that stood out, anything that was interesting, (if appropriate) number of times object observed or if it was the first time observed.

 

Additional information to illustrate your techniques and equipment used, to assist other members, is encouraged and appreciated. Post-processing of EAA images is not allowed under any circumstances.

 

Edited to add: Our view on post-processing is basically any enhancement process occurring after the capture software has saved the final image into a storage device. The key word being enhancement, image manipulation like cropping, zooming, rotating, annotating, inverting, and file size compression is deemed acceptable.

 

Those that do not conform will be removed without notice. Repeat offenders will be subject to loss of forum access.

Bravo!


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#9 dr.who

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Posted 06 December 2019 - 04:32 AM

Nicely done Corey!
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#10 Rickster

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Posted 07 December 2019 - 07:42 PM

This post is a spin off a Comet Borisov thread that I originated here:   https://www.cloudyni...risov-c2019-q4/ That thread was limited to 5 min integrations by the current forum rules.  One of my integrations was 20 minutes long to show the Comet movement.  So I am posting it here in the unlimited integration thread.

 

The comet appears to be elongated in the integrations, due to it's movement.  The comet appeared more star like in single exposures. 

 

This was my first integration.  I used 5 second exposures to attempt to minimize the impact that the atmospheric instability would have on the image.  The stars were really dancing at this altitude (~30 degrees).  But, instead, it created a noise rainfall.  Subsequent integrations of 30 sec exposures did not have this problem.

 

ASI183MM Pro, 4x4 bin (1.1 asec/px), gain 130, cooler -30F.  SkyWatcher 16" 1800mm f4.4 Newt on GEM, autoguided.  Cartes du Ciel, Sharpcap, PHD2.

 

243 x 5sec, saved as viewed, cropped.

Attached Thumbnails

  • Borisov 243x5sec.png

Edited by Rickster, 07 December 2019 - 07:42 PM.

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#11 goldtr8

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Posted 08 December 2019 - 07:54 AM

Its been 6 weeks since the last time I was out in the observatory.   Clouds and recovering from surgery kept me from doing any observing.   But last night was supposed to have a couple of hour window of clear sky which turned out to be not the case.   Instead all I had was a cloudy moon to look at and a soon as I shut everything down, closed the roof and locked up then the sky's cleared.   So I quickly turned everything back on an opened the roof and I had 1/2 hour of semi clear skies.

 

My planned target was the comet for the night was C/2017 T2 as I was inspired by the shots from cmooney91 a few reports above.   I really wanted to see a comet with a tail on my own..   So long story short, I did not have good focus but I was running out of time.   I don't have any flats right now as I am trying to readjust my backspacing between my camera and focal reducer, I am trying to tune in the distance to get better stars out at the edges and improve on the vignetting.  But if I would have had a couple of hours of no cloud time, I would have had the fun of playing with the equipment and getting stuff sorted out.   I know I have issues with my setup but that is part of the fun to get it right.

 

Anyway with the backdrop for the observation session last night here is was able to finally see and capture before the clouds completely shut me down.

 

This is Comet C/2017 T2 as captured with my Celestron 8 in SCT with a 6.3 focal reducer flatner, ISA294MC non cooled camera using SharpCap Pro 3.2.   Note I was trying 24 second exposures with a gain setting of 250.   I am in a bortal 4/5 area and I had just watched Robin Glover's presentation and my understanding from what he was saying this should be close to optimum exposure length.  However, I was not able to do some experimentation as was my plan.

Anyway despite all the above stuff I had fun and I got enough detail to have made it worth the effort before the clouds totally shut me down.

 

COMET-C-2017-T2 Stack_14frames_336s_WithDisplayStretch   24 second exposure time gain 250.

COMET-C-2017-T2  Stack_14frames_336s_WithDisplayStretch.jpg

 

 

PS to the moderators,  I think you guys nailed the new rules for the EAA forum.  Thanks!


Edited by goldtr8, 08 December 2019 - 07:57 AM.

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#12 star drop

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Posted 08 December 2019 - 10:56 AM

Was Comet C/2017 T2 visible on your first 24 second exposure?



#13 goldtr8

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Posted 08 December 2019 - 06:05 PM

Was Comet C/2017 T2 visible on your first 24 second exposure?

Going back an looking at individual frames its very faint.   So with the help of knowing where it is in the stack, I can say yes it was visible but very faintly.



#14 Ptarmigan

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Posted 08 December 2019 - 07:36 PM

Going back an looking at individual frames its very faint.   So with the help of knowing where it is in the stack, I can say yes it was visible but very faintly.

I found the ASI294MC very sensitive. It exceeded my expectation. The cooling helps a lot. cool.gif



#15 Astrojedi

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Posted 10 December 2019 - 03:57 PM

Thanks to the Mods for starting this thread. Much appreciated.

 

Here is Draco trio from a past observing session. Pulling out detail was a bit of a struggle from my red/white LP zone backyard hence required a slightly longer exposure than my typical. Transparency was a bit poor as well. As a side note I had gotten a really good visual observation of the trio from the Julian Star Fest this summer. Looked very similar in my 14".

 

EdgeHD 8 @ F5, ASI290MM, 40x15s stack, no filters, SharpCap Pro live stack. SQM ~18.4, poor transparency

 

Draco Trio 40x15s.jpg

 

 

 


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#16 star drop

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Posted 10 December 2019 - 06:20 PM

What types of galaxies are these?

 

From left to right:

 

[edge-on spiral NGC 5981, elliptical galaxy NGC 5982, and face-on spiral NGC 5985]

 

The one one the right, NGC 5985, appears to have an oval nucleus. Could it be a barred spiral? The spiral arm at the top left appears to have a clumpy texture. Might those be H II regions?

 

How many other galaxies can be seen in your image. Are they bright enough to be seen on a single exposure.



#17 Don Rudny

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Posted 10 December 2019 - 07:35 PM

This capture was taken the other night at my home observatory on the windward side of the Big Island of Hawaii.  It was a rare clear night.  The moon was pretty bright, so I decided to use a narrow band Ha filter to view some emission nebulae with my SX694m camera on a C1100HD at f/2 with Hyperstar.  This is the Rosette Nebula with the open cluster NGC2244 at its center.  The Rosette is about 5200ly away and 130ly in diameter.  The center hole is about 30ly across.

 

I was pleased with the amount of detail In a fairly short sub of 60s and total exposure of ten minutes.  I have never gotten such detail in the dark nebula.  The full res view was even better.

 

882BB2E1-E1B9-4D14-A4DE-51FB3FC51A8E.jpeg


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#18 Rickster

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Posted 10 December 2019 - 11:38 PM

Very unusual shot of the Rosette.  Very cool.


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#19 Astrojedi

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Posted 11 December 2019 - 12:12 AM

What types of galaxies are these?

 

From left to right:

 

[edge-on spiral NGC 5981, elliptical galaxy NGC 5982, and face-on spiral NGC 5985]

 

The one one the right, NGC 5985, appears to have an oval nucleus. Could it be a barred spiral? The spiral arm at the top left appears to have a clumpy texture. Might those be H II regions?

 

How many other galaxies can be seen in your image. Are they bright enough to be seen on a single exposure.

Good points - I should have mentioned. This is a pretty popular object hence skipped the detail.

 

The Draco group is unique trio of galaxies - I have used this field for outreach on many occasions. Always gets a good response.

 

5982 - E type Elliptical (center)

5985 - Sb type Spiral (tilted - almost face on)

5981 - SBbc type Spiral (edge on)

 

5985 - the clumpiness is indeed HII regions but does not show up very well in my capture... This galaxy also has a very interesting spiral structure with extend sprial arms - see this image https://telescopius....alaxy/by-pavebo. Again does not show up well in EAA from my heavy LP location. Surprisingly the view in my 14" from a dark site in good conditions is very similar.


Edited by Astrojedi, 11 December 2019 - 12:13 AM.

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#20 star drop

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Posted 11 December 2019 - 03:24 PM

This capture was taken the other night at my home observatory on the windward side of the Big Island of Hawaii.  It was a rare clear night.  The moon was pretty bright, so I decided to use a narrow band Ha filter to view some emission nebulae with my SX694m camera on a C1100HD at f/2 with Hyperstar.  This is the Rosette Nebula with the open cluster NGC2244 at its center.  The Rosette is about 5200ly away and 130ly in diameter.  The center hole is about 30ly across.

 

I was pleased with the amount of detail In a fairly short sub of 60s and total exposure of ten minutes.  I have never gotten such detail in the dark nebula.  The full res view was even better.

 

attachicon.gif 882BB2E1-E1B9-4D14-A4DE-51FB3FC51A8E.jpeg

Very nice. Your image looks like it is three dimensional.


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#21 Don Rudny

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Posted 11 December 2019 - 06:59 PM

Very nice. Your image looks like it is three dimensional.

Thanks, Ted.

 

Besides having great skies here, the Rosette was high in the sky at this time almost reaching the meridian. I think that had an impact on the ability to see more detail.  I should have added that in my report.

 

Don



#22 Ptarmigan

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Posted 11 December 2019 - 07:19 PM

Thanks to the Mods for starting this thread. Much appreciated.

 

Here is Draco trio from a past observing session. Pulling out detail was a bit of a struggle from my red/white LP zone backyard hence required a slightly longer exposure than my typical. Transparency was a bit poor as well. As a side note I had gotten a really good visual observation of the trio from the Julian Star Fest this summer. Looked very similar in my 14".

 

EdgeHD 8 @ F5, ASI290MM, 40x15s stack, no filters, SharpCap Pro live stack. SQM ~18.4, poor transparency

 

Draco Trio 40x15s.jpg

Nice image. cool.gif waytogo.gif

 

It would be cool if there was a planet in the center galaxy. One could see two bright galaxies. cool.gif


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#23 descott12

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Posted 11 December 2019 - 07:27 PM

This capture was taken the other night at my home observatory on the windward side of the Big Island of Hawaii.  It was a rare clear night.  The moon was pretty bright, so I decided to use a narrow band Ha filter to view some emission nebulae with my SX694m camera on a C1100HD at f/2 with Hyperstar.  This is the Rosette Nebula with the open cluster NGC2244 at its center.  The Rosette is about 5200ly away and 130ly in diameter.  The center hole is about 30ly across.

 

I was pleased with the amount of detail In a fairly short sub of 60s and total exposure of ten minutes.  I have never gotten such detail in the dark nebula.  The full res view was even better.

 

882BB2E1-E1B9-4D14-A4DE-51FB3FC51A8E.jpeg

That is by far the most remarkable non-post-processed image I have seen. Truly amazing. What mount are you using that allows 60 second exposures?



#24 Astrojedi

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Posted 11 December 2019 - 08:13 PM

That is by far the most remarkable non-post-processed image I have seen. Truly amazing. What mount are you using that allows 60 second exposures?

That is the magic of observing at a fast f2 focal ratio from Don's beautiful / dark Hawaii skies with a mono camera. Great capture.


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#25 Don Rudny

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Posted 11 December 2019 - 08:22 PM

That is by far the most remarkable non-post-processed image I have seen. Truly amazing. What mount are you using that allows 60 second exposures?

Thanks, Dave. 

 

I have an AP 1100GTO.  I don’t use guiding, but I use the AP RAPAS and a Polaris position APP that corrects for refraction for polar alignment.  It makes a difference.  As I wrote in response to Ted, our skies here are very good, and the object was high in the sky.  That makes a difference, too.  The original capture was reduced from 8MB to about 300KB to meet the posting limit.  That was the only post processing, but I think that’s allowed.

 

This post has some pics of my home and away setups.

 

https://www.cloudyni...-eaa/?p=9811775


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