Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

After 0.25 century and six weeks...

  • Please log in to reply
153 replies to this topic

#51 j.gardavsky

j.gardavsky

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,625
  • Joined: 18 Sep 2019
  • Loc: Germany

Posted 09 December 2019 - 07:48 AM

Hello Thomas,

 

I am joining the others with the congratulations on the problem fixed!

I like your term "rapid deployment telescope".

 

Clear skies and many great observing sessions,

 

JG


  • Astrojensen likes this

#52 Astrojensen

Astrojensen

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 13,271
  • Joined: 05 Oct 2008
  • Loc: Bornholm, Denmark

Posted 09 December 2019 - 10:48 AM

Thanks, everyone.

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark



#53 Astrojensen

Astrojensen

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 13,271
  • Joined: 05 Oct 2008
  • Loc: Bornholm, Denmark

Posted 09 December 2019 - 10:53 AM

Hi Thomas.  FWIW, when I use the 1.25" Zeiss prism and direct connect my WO binos to that, there is plenty of focuser travel to use the binoviewer without OCA!  My preference is a pair of 17.5mm Morpheus in this configuration (68x @ 2.2mm Exit Pupil).  When I do this, I usually never change the eyepieces as that magnification seems about perfect for everything non-lunar/planetary.

Hi Bill

 

Yes, the ability to use a binoviewer without barlow has not escaped my attention. I've just not had time to play with it in that configuration yet. 

 

I have a Zeiss binoviewer (Denis Levatic tuned) that can use a pair of 24mm ES68's without vignetting (at least to any noticeable degree) and It'll be interesting to look at some of the winter deep-sky highlights with this combination.

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark



#54 Wildetelescope

Wildetelescope

    Vanguard

  • -----
  • Posts: 2,029
  • Joined: 12 Feb 2015
  • Loc: Maryland

Posted 09 December 2019 - 11:35 AM

Hi Bill

 

Yes, the ability to use a binoviewer without barlow has not escaped my attention. I've just not had time to play with it in that configuration yet. 

 

I have a Zeiss binoviewer (Denis Levatic tuned) that can use a pair of 24mm ES68's without vignetting (at least to any noticeable degree) and It'll be interesting to look at some of the winter deep-sky highlights with this combination.

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

I am glad to see you have gotten things squared away!  I see the quote from Jon Issacs in your signature, and I agree with it.  As much as I enjoy playing with cameras, and software etc....  there is something very intimate about observing directly through the eyepiece.  I am not a particularly disciplined visual observer, but I ALWAYS wind up staying out longer than intended with I go for the "quick" look with my kids.  I just get drawn in and time passes. 

 

About a 3 weeks ago, I had my vintage 6 inch AP f9 out in my red zone back yard with a friend. He has interest in doing imaging and I wanted to show him what was involved so I figured we would point it at Andromeda and take a few snaps.  Before doing that however, we popped in my 35 mm pan to take a look our neighbor.  The scope is relatively new to me, so this is the first time I had pointed at Andromeda.  I live in an red zone area, and this is the very first time I was ever able to detect dust lanes through a refractor in my back yard.  Have to love that 6 inch glass!  Frankly, my friend and I both agree that the view at the eyepiece was more memorable than the images we grabbed.  I hope you will find hours of enjoyment with your new scope and that it will bring you closer to the universe we all cherish.  

 

Happy Holidays to everyone.

 

JMD


  • stevew, Astrojensen and eros312 like this

#55 daquad

daquad

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,757
  • Joined: 14 May 2008

Posted 09 December 2019 - 12:19 PM

Hi Thomas.  FWIW, when I use the 1.25" Zeiss prism and direct connect my WO binos to that, there is plenty of focuser travel to use the binoviewer without OCA!  My preference is a pair of 17.5mm Morpheus in this configuration (68x @ 2.2mm Exit Pupil).  When I do this, I usually never change the eyepieces as that magnification seems about perfect for everything non-lunar/planetary.

I use mine with a baader Maxbright and T2 prism and 18 mm SWA Meades (series 4000) and no OCA.  67X and 1 degree field of view.  I sometimes use the 24.5 mm's, at 49X and 1.3 degree field.

 

Dom Q.


  • Astrojensen likes this

#56 HCR32

HCR32

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 806
  • Joined: 27 Aug 2010
  • Loc: Melbourne Australia

Posted 09 December 2019 - 08:22 PM

Hi Bill

Yes, the ability to use a binoviewer without barlow has not escaped my attention. I've just not had time to play with it in that configuration yet.

I have a Zeiss binoviewer (Denis Levatic tuned) that can use a pair of 24mm ES68's without vignetting (at least to any noticeable degree) and It'll be interesting to look at some of the winter deep-sky highlights with this combination.


Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

The scope works even better with Zeiss Binos and zeiss T2 prism. I used that setup two nights ago for the first time and now, I regret not getting out earlier while Jupiter and Saturn where visible. It also helps with the scopes heavy nose to center balance a little further back. I have the 2.5” focuser which doesn’t require any OCS/OCA it works as is. I’m not sure if it works without OCS with the bigger focuser due to the longer light path.

Edited by HCR32, 09 December 2019 - 11:00 PM.


#57 BillP

BillP

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 20,359
  • Joined: 26 Nov 2006
  • Loc: Spotsylvania, VA

Posted 09 December 2019 - 10:43 PM

Good point.  I have the 2.5" focuser as well.



#58 Astrojensen

Astrojensen

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 13,271
  • Joined: 05 Oct 2008
  • Loc: Bornholm, Denmark

Posted 10 December 2019 - 03:27 PM

 

I have the 2.5” focuser which doesn’t require any OCS/OCA it works as is. I’m not sure if it works without OCS with the bigger focuser due to the longer light path.

Back focus is the same on both models, 180mm. 

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark



#59 Astrojensen

Astrojensen

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 13,271
  • Joined: 05 Oct 2008
  • Loc: Bornholm, Denmark

Posted 10 December 2019 - 03:52 PM

Had the scope out again this evening. Sadly, the seeing was very poor. With a bit of forethought, the scope is turning out to be remarkably easy to use on a normal weekday evening, as long as you can plan so far ahead, that you can put it out half an hour or more in advance. An hour is better. 

 

And the scope is so good, you'll want to use it at every opportunity. I'm falling in love with the mechanics of the scope, as well as the optics. The focuser is just sublime and everything reaches focus easily. The Vixen Saturn mount is just the right size for the scope. The dewcap is big and long and the objective hasn't dewed up once yet. It's just a downright pleasure to use this scope. Once you get it cooled down, it's remarkably trouble-free. It just plain works. 

 

I left the scope outside for a couple of hours, but the seeing didn't improve at all. Suddenly, clouds came rolling in, so I packed up. Then the clouds left again immediately... I didn't bother setting up the 6" again, but I did grab my Zeiss Telemator for a quick comparison. What struck me was just *how* much more detailed the views in the 6" were. Math and logic says that a 152mm has 2.4x the resolution of a 63mm, but in practice, it feels like much, MUCH more. Like an order of magnitude more. 

 

What was also apparent was how much smaller the Telemator is and how much faster and easier it is to set up... And I still had a good time with it, despite the views obviously lacking the sheer resolution and brightness of the 152mm. I'll still be using it on evenings, where setting up the 152mm will be too much trouble. 

 

 

Clear skies!

Thomas, Denmark 


  • Jan Owen, stevew, daquad and 9 others like this

#60 daquad

daquad

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,757
  • Joined: 14 May 2008

Posted 10 December 2019 - 07:25 PM

Back focus is the same on both models, 180mm. 

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

Yes,  I have the 3.7" focuser and have no trouble reaching focus with the Baader Maxbrite and the T2 prism.  I don't even have a barlow that will fit the nosepiece of the Baader.

 

Dom Q.


  • Astrojensen likes this

#61 payner

payner

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,141
  • Joined: 22 Mar 2007
  • Loc: Bluegrass & Cumberland Valley Regions, Kentucky

Posted 11 December 2019 - 01:10 PM

Hi Thomas: It is really great to read what was once a thread of concern and disappointment has turned, and now you are using those positive adjectives to describe your new telescope. A 6-inch refractor of good quality is a formidable planetary and double star instrument. Of course the list doesn't stop with those two class objects.

 

Regards,


  • Astrojensen likes this

#62 Astrojensen

Astrojensen

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 13,271
  • Joined: 05 Oct 2008
  • Loc: Bornholm, Denmark

Posted 11 December 2019 - 01:57 PM

A 6-inch refractor of good quality is a formidable planetary and double star instrument. Of course the list doesn't stop with those two class objects.

I suspect it will turn out to be a really strong deep-sky scope. Especially on small planetary nebulae, thanks to the really sharp optics, but also large, low surface brightness galaxies and the like. What little deep-sky I've seen with it so far has been extremely encouraging. 

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark


  • Jacques, n2068dd, Bomber Bob and 2 others like this

#63 Fomalhaut

Fomalhaut

    Surveyor 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,763
  • Joined: 16 Aug 2008
  • Loc: Switzerland

Posted 11 December 2019 - 02:03 PM

It is really great to read what was once a thread of concern and disappointment has turned, ...


The first part of the story is not just forgotten:
We know now there are samples of widely differing quality out there, which can teach us to stay attentive and even cautious.

Edited by Fomalhaut, 11 December 2019 - 05:31 PM.

  • Astrojensen, salico, Steve Allison and 2 others like this

#64 Robert Zebahl

Robert Zebahl

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 120
  • Joined: 12 Aug 2016
  • Loc: Leipzig, Germany

Posted 11 December 2019 - 05:29 PM

Hi Thomas,

 

I have read your posts about the new refractor with great interest and I am very happy that you are obviously very satisfied now.

 

Two things would still interest me: How do you rate the refractor in comparison to the 4-inch f/11 ED refractor regarding optical performance? I think I have read that you also have a 6-inch f/8 achromat. If so, do you have any idea of how much the difference between both 6-inch refractors is, if you limit it to deepsky observations up to normal magnification (150x)?

 

CS,

Robert


  • Astrojensen, Bomber Bob and Tyson M like this

#65 Bomber Bob

Bomber Bob

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 17,938
  • Joined: 09 Jul 2013
  • Loc: The Swamp, USA

Posted 11 December 2019 - 09:55 PM

I suspect it will turn out to be a really strong deep-sky scope. Especially on small planetary nebulae, thanks to the really sharp optics, but also large, low surface brightness galaxies and the like. What little deep-sky I've seen with it so far has been extremely encouraging. 

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

Thomas, when you get a chance, turn that Big ED to M42, and have your mind blown.  Or, ease into it with The Crab first...


  • Astrojensen and j.gardavsky like this

#66 Traveler

Traveler

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,553
  • Joined: 19 Aug 2007
  • Loc: The Netherlands

Posted 12 December 2019 - 01:17 PM

The first part of the story is not just forgotten:
We know now there are samples of widely differing quality out there, which can teach us to stay attentive and even cautious.

 ...and that there is a review here at CN that didnt told the whole story...Just the story only after Markus gave some instructions to fix the problems which occured when the APM arrived in the US...

 

On this I know now two things at least...



#67 garret

garret

    Surveyor 1

  • ****-
  • Posts: 1,642
  • Joined: 26 Jul 2009
  • Loc: Netherlands

Posted 12 December 2019 - 02:13 PM

 ...and that there is a review here at CN that didnt told the whole story...Just the story only after Markus gave some instructions to fix the problems which occured when the APM arrived in the US...

 

On this I know now two things at least...

Don't bring up the past again, the original topic from Astrojensen about his purchase of the APM 152 was locked for that reason.

APM has solved that particular problem long ago.

No one here knows where the (former) optical problem with the APM 152 telescope of Astrojensen originated.

 

According to Mark Ludes (on the Vendor forum?) every APM objective is interferometrically tested and checked by Mark Ludes before the optics get the green light and goes to the coater.

(translation by Google)

 

Garret van der Veen



#68 jay.i

jay.i

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,836
  • Joined: 11 Jun 2017
  • Loc: Minneapolis, MN

Posted 12 December 2019 - 02:41 PM

Thomas, I'm really happy to see you are finally getting to enjoy your new scope. A shame the first was a dud, but, it happens... at least APM made it right (hopefully at no cost to you). I have considered an APM152 for a while as potentially my only big scope (would sell the EON120 and FC-100DF); anything less than a serious session would get the FC-76DC. Your comments about thermal acclimation time give me pause, though I wasn't about to pull the trigger I suppose. Here in Minnesota we get crazy cold winters that basically make it pointless to go out and observe because it's just miserable, and then you worry about your expensive telescope and eyepieces (even though if you put them in a case and let them warm up overnight they are fine). I may still get an APM152 before the Mars opposition next year, we'll see.

 

Thanks again for your comments and congrats on the new scope. I look forward to living vicariously through your reports :)


  • Paul Schroeder, Astrojensen, Bomber Bob and 1 other like this

#69 salico

salico

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 741
  • Joined: 12 Jul 2016
  • Loc: Germany

Posted 12 December 2019 - 04:20 PM

severe collimation issues in MCs, problems with prisms in binocs, now this with the ED152... the public deserves to be reminded...

 

cheers


  • Fomalhaut and Magnus Ahrling like this

#70 BillP

BillP

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 20,359
  • Joined: 26 Nov 2006
  • Loc: Spotsylvania, VA

Posted 13 December 2019 - 08:22 AM

Hi Thomas: It is really great to read what was once a thread of concern and disappointment has turned, and now you are using those positive adjectives to describe your new telescope. 

 

I agree!  But I expected as much as Thomas does not seem to be a throw up your hands and give up kind of person who can only function with instant gratification. Instead he persevered through some initial problems working as needed to get them resolved and now has reaped the greater rewards when one is not deterred by effort and is discovering the rose hidden amongst the weeds. Congrats again on your new scope!  You have lots of pleasant discoveries awaiting you in the heavens above waytogo.gif


  • stevew, payner, Astrojensen and 1 other like this

#71 Fomalhaut

Fomalhaut

    Surveyor 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,763
  • Joined: 16 Aug 2008
  • Loc: Switzerland

Posted 13 December 2019 - 12:28 PM

As for me, I'm ready to pay a descent price to a decent dealer for a decent quality scope,

and this without additionally being obliged to prove personal qualities of mine such as

perseverence or caution to avoid the thorns of the rose hidden in the weeds…flowerred.gif

 

IOW, even bad (impatient) guys such as me grin.gif have the right not to be sold a lemmon, after all.

 

Or, more honestly: My first FCT100 (see below) was also such a citrus fruit and made me fight and wait for the peak quality which I had paid for

and which I  finally got evillaugh.gif, 27 years ago... 


Edited by Fomalhaut, 13 December 2019 - 12:51 PM.

  • John Huntley, Astrojensen, salico and 2 others like this

#72 BillP

BillP

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 20,359
  • Joined: 26 Nov 2006
  • Loc: Spotsylvania, VA

Posted 13 December 2019 - 08:48 PM

IOW, even bad (impatient) guys such as me grin.gif have the right not to be sold a lemon, after all.

 

I hear you.  But when you expect everything to go right, more often you are just setting yourself up for disappointments or frustrations in life IMO.  But some folks like it that way, not something I like though.  I've just made it a practice to remember that no one is perfect, everyone makes mistakes, many people are lazy so do not do their assigned tasks well, etc.  I also generally will not purchase something if I am unwilling to roll my sleeves up and correct issues discovered.  IMO "problems" in life are just opportunities to learn more and become more skilled.  I probably became this way as a consequence of some of my past professions, some of which were operational in nature and when stuff went wrong, more often than not the expedient thing to do was to fix it yourself. lol.gif

 

My 152 was badly out of collimation after the long trip from China to Germany, then Germany to western US, then truck to eastern US.  Since it was a new product back then there was no manual for it, or how to collimate it.  I never saw 3 push-pull screws before but figured it out and did the collimation.  After that it was and is a sublime performer. Not really an "issue" though as if a refractor has a collimatable cell, then collimation is generally a user maintenace item.
 


Edited by BillP, 13 December 2019 - 09:21 PM.

  • daquad, Astrojensen and Bomber Bob like this

#73 John Huntley

John Huntley

    Mercury-Atlas

  • ***--
  • Posts: 2,705
  • Joined: 16 Jul 2006
  • Loc: SW England

Posted 13 December 2019 - 09:37 PM

The Skywatcher ED150 got a huge amount of critisism when the early examples were delivered with some packaging and objective cell design issues that needed sorting. Why are we being so forgiving of these APM 152mm F/8's that have issues when they cost a good chunk more than the Skywatcher ED150 and have been around for a lot longer ?


  • 25585 likes this

#74 Kunama

Kunama

    Aussie at large

  • *****
  • Posts: 5,709
  • Joined: 22 Oct 2012
  • Loc: Canberra, Australia

Posted 13 December 2019 - 09:58 PM

The Skywatcher ED150 got a huge amount of critisism when the early examples were delivered with some packaging and objective cell design issues that needed sorting. Why are we being so forgiving of these APM 152mm F/8's that have issues when they cost a good chunk more than the Skywatcher ED150 and have been around for a lot longer ?

John,

The SW ED150 and the APM are very big scopes at what is essentially a bargain price, if one wants to be guaranteed that every sample will arrive in perfect condition with minimal variation between individual scopes and provide top tier views then, as you well know, one has to open their wallets a bit wider.  The main thing with this issue is that the vendor did rectify the situation and the buyer has a great example.  

 

I seem to recall the excitement of many, many people on forums when these large doublets were announced, but I wonder how many of those people actually put their hand in their wallet and bought the scopes.

The SW retailers here in Australia are offering big discounts on the SW150ED to keep them moving, perhaps they will eventually drop the model as it seems much of the early enthusiasm was just hot air...

 

I had the APM140F7 and I thought it performed very well given its price.  I didn't expect a perfect star test or high Strehl/ low RMS value as I wasn't paying enough money to demand those.....


Edited by Kunama, 13 December 2019 - 10:00 PM.

  • RogerLaureys, Astrojensen and Wildetelescope like this

#75 Astrojensen

Astrojensen

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 13,271
  • Joined: 05 Oct 2008
  • Loc: Bornholm, Denmark

Posted 14 December 2019 - 11:37 AM

 

I wonder how many of those people actually put their hand in their wallet and bought the scopes.

Not many, apparently. I actually was one of the original proponents of the APM 152/1200 ED and I felt bad about it for years, since I didn't have the money to actually buy it. But I did keep my word and bought it, once I had the cash. 

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark


  • Kunama, Bomber Bob, Magnus Ahrling and 1 other like this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics