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Inherited Tele-Vue Genesis SDF

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#1 rgrhorton

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Posted 08 December 2019 - 11:25 PM

Recently inherited a TeleVue Genesis SDF and an Astroscan from my uncle. Not knowing what I really got I thought the Astroscan must be something special because well, it looks weird lol. After digging it seems the Astroscan while cool isn't really anything special and that the Genesis was the special thing I got. Also came with an array of eye pieces and a NGC-Max computer thing. Looks like it will plug into the bottom of the Gibraltar tripod. 

 

I've always been enamored with space and the stars and have gone to see a couple launches, a Falcon 9 and the Falcon Heavy. Never got into astronomy for whatever reason but plan to now that I have some equipment to get me going. Also ordered a DSLR with the idea of trying my hand at astrophotography. Anyways below is what I have. I think one of the first things I might need to add to the scope is some kind of finder scope to help find stuff in the sky. Any suggestions on this or anything else are appreciated.

 

Edit: Note the wire on the tripod is something I slapped on just to mess with it for now. The plate was missing so I plan to use some small chain link to fix it.

Attached Thumbnails

  • SDF.jpg
  • SDF2.jpg
  • Astroscan.jpg
  • Eye Pieces 2.jpg
  • Eye Pieces.jpg
  • MGC-Max.jpg
  • Tripod Connection.jpg

Edited by rgrhorton, 08 December 2019 - 11:27 PM.

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#2 Terra Nova

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Posted 08 December 2019 - 11:30 PM

Congratulations on your TV Genesis SDF. They are wonderful scopes and the Gibralter Mount and wooden tripod does a great job handling it. I have a similar setup and I love it. If I could only keep one of my scopes it would probably be my GSDF. You’ll be able to see a lot of astronomy with it.
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#3 rgrhorton

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Posted 08 December 2019 - 11:36 PM

Thanks. Not versed with different scopes but will say I was amazed at how clear the moon was when I first tried it out. Everything was so crisp and three dimensional looking. My wife was pretty in awe as well when she checked it out. 


Edited by rgrhorton, 08 December 2019 - 11:37 PM.

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#4 M11Mike

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Posted 08 December 2019 - 11:46 PM

Lucky you - great scope and a great compliment of high-end TV eyepieces.  

 

Great start - enjoy your 'new' hobby.

 

M11Mike  


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#5 EV1970VE

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Posted 08 December 2019 - 11:55 PM

A beautiful telescope. I owned one for a few years. If you plan to try your hand at astro-photography, you won't be able to do it with that Gibraltar mount. You'll need a tracking mount. 

 

As you learn to use the scope and mount, make sure you're careful when changing eyepieces. When you take out one of the heavy 2" eyepieces your uncle left you, the scope could nose dive with the tube smacking the Gibraltar base. Just be aware of that.  

 

A good finder scope for the SDF that I used was the TeleVue Starbeam Finder. Because it's TeleVue, it's made to mount to their tube ring. If you go with another brand, you'll need to make sure it can be mounted to the tube ring. Not all can be. 

 

Other than that, this scope excels at low power wide field views. The darker your viewing location the better for this scope. It's also good for mid power and while I did use it for higher power planetary viewing and it was ok for that, it's not really designed for that. Low power wide field is where it excels. 


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#6 rgrhorton

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Posted 09 December 2019 - 12:02 AM

A beautiful telescope. I owned one for a few years. If you plan to try your hand at astro-photography, you won't be able to do it with that Gibraltar mount. You'll need a tracking mount. 

 

As you learn to use the scope and mount, make sure you're careful when changing eyepieces. When you take out one of the heavy 2" eyepieces your uncle left you, the scope could nose dive with the tube smacking the Gibraltar base. Just be aware of that.  

 

A good finder scope for the SDF that I used was the TeleVue Starbeam Finder. Because it's TeleVue, it's made to mount to their tube ring. If you go with another brand, you'll need to make sure it can be mounted to the tube ring. Not all can be. 

 

Other than that, this scope excels at low power wide field views. The darker your viewing location the better for this scope. It's also good for mid power and while I did use it for higher power planetary viewing and it was ok for that, it's not really designed for that. Low power wide field is where it excels. 

Being I'm new to all of this, any recommendations as to what eye pieces would be my go to's?

 

I'll check out those finders. I think that will be a lot of help. 


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#7 Traveler

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Posted 09 December 2019 - 12:10 AM

As a finder i would use a 40mm EP. I for instance use a Pentax 40mm as a "finder" ep with my Traveler…I think the TV 55 does also this trick.

 

Congrats with your Genisis btw. As you might know, Stephen James O'Meara made some nice guidebooks with it.


Edited by Traveler, 09 December 2019 - 12:11 AM.

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#8 Littlegreenman

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Posted 09 December 2019 - 04:39 AM

I'm envious. You have a great scope. Some thoughts:

 

1. The "plate" is called a tripod tray . It bolts onto the "tabs" sticking out of the legs. The tray has several functions. 1. is keep the legs from spreading open and the whole thing falling to the ground. The wire(s) tied to the legs inside the tripod will do that. It adds rigidity to the tripod. A tripod with the shakes will show shakes at the eyepiece. And, it's place to put eyepiece, etc. on.

Trays are not listed for sale on the Tele Vue (TV) website, but TV Vue is a classy outfit and might have trays to sell. Give them a call. I think your mount is an older Gilbralter mount. The new Gilbralter mounts appear to have a different tray. You also want the thumb-screws to bolt it on. They look similar to the bolts that tighten the legs.

Or, you can place a wanted ad here on CN Classified for a used tray. If a genuine TV Tray is not to be found, other trays, like a Vixen brand tray may work. When talking to TV, if you are missing any eyepiece caps, they may have them.

 

Aside: Tele Vue makes great things, including trays. They tend to be in the higher priced range. Most accessories do not have to be TV if you need to budget.

 

2. Cleaning the optics, telescope and eyepieces. 

Don't! Repeat, do not clean the optics or the eyepieces until you learn how to do it safely without damaging them.

a. Check out out the Beginners forum. A lot of useful info including how to clean optics, and when not to. What clothing to wear. What to drink or eat. How to organize. Things you never thought of.

 

3. If you do not have them, a case to store the telescope, and another for the eyepieces. The tripod and mount don't need a case, but something for the electronic thing. Yep, Tele Vue makes an eyepiece case. They may have a scope case. 

 

4. The NGC Max by JMI is a computer that gives you the celestial coordinates that the scope is pointing at. As you move the aim of the telescope the numbers change, and you can look up where it it pointing. And you can look up the numbers for an object you want to look at, and move the scope to those numbers. Check the NGC website for instructions, or ask here on the Mount Forum if anyone has a manual and instructions and or Google it.

 

5. An observing chair. This will add greatly to your comfort. Tele Vue makes one, but there are a lot of alternatives, including home made. 

Enjoy!


Edited by Littlegreenman, 09 December 2019 - 04:42 AM.

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#9 rgrhorton

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Posted 09 December 2019 - 06:36 AM

Thanks for all of the tips. More research for me to do! Ask my wife, I'm good at researching lol. She jokes with me that when I get into a new hobby I must become an expert at it as soon as possible lol. 

 

The thumb screws for the tray are there so that was good anyways. In speaking with my sister she seems to think she might have seen the tray at her and my moms place but I live a few hours away and haven't been back to see. Once I confirm if they have it or not, if the answer is no I'll call TV for sure. My sisters not so sharp so I don't have any faith that it's there. Take that for what you will. 

 

The telescope did come with the hard case as well so that was a score. It has places for some eye pieces to include all of the 2". I am using a foam padded pistol case for the remainder of the 1.25" pieces that won't fit in the hard case for the telescope.

 

Had no idea they made special chairs but I'll have to look into that!


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#10 Russell Smith

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Posted 09 December 2019 - 08:25 AM

First off, I am truly sorry for your loss.
As for your inheritance gift, you could not do much better. I do hope observing brings you years of pleasure.
Russ
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#11 rolo

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Posted 09 December 2019 - 08:41 AM

Nice inheritence! I have the TV102 with the Sky Tour object computer. Here's picture so can see how its mounted. It works very well and its a pleasure to use. Your scope can give you a lifetime of viewing pleasure si i hope you habng on to itwaytogo.gif

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#12 EV1970VE

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Posted 09 December 2019 - 11:48 AM

Being I'm new to all of this, any recommendations as to what eye pieces would be my go to's?

 

I'll check out those finders. I think that will be a lot of help. 

Of the eyepieces you have, the 27mm Panoptic would be an excellent low power eyepiece. That would give you a True Field of View (TFOV) of about 3.24 Degrees at a magnification of about 20X and an exit pupil of about 5.05mm. The TFOV would be mesmerizing especially when panning across star fields but that large exit pupil means if you're viewing in a light polluted area, you might notice a bit of a lightened or washed out background sky. You might find yourself starting with that eyepiece each time out before moving to more targeted views at higher magnification. The 55mm Plossl would give you an even wider TFOV of about 4.88 Degrees but the exit pupil would be over 10mm. And at a magnification of just 10X, for me would be an eyepiece I wouldn't use much unless at a dark site or if using filters for some fainter deep sky objects. But at 10X magnification, I'm not sure how useful it would be even for that. You may end up not using that eyepiece much. Someone mentioned using the 55m Plossl as your finder eyepiece and while this is a good idea and something many do, with a Gibraltar mount, would be a bit frustrating because when you find the object you want to view, as you remove the eyepiece to insert a higher magnification eyepiece, you find you might lose the target during that swap out/in process. Especially if going from your 1lb Plossl to your much lighter 19mm Wide Field. It could work for a while but adding a dedicated finder would just make things more fun and easier.

 

Your 12mm Nagler (can't tell if it's Type 2 or 4) would be phenomenal with the SDF. Would provide a TFOV of about 1.80 Degrees and an exit pupil of about 2.24mm and a magnification of 45X. This may become your most used eyepiece with that scope.

 

Of your other eyepieces, I think I see a 19mm wide field a 4.8 Nagler and some plossl's and an Ortho. All are good eyepieces. 

 

What you should do as part of your research into the hobby is go to TeleVue's website and read the articles posted there on eyepiece selection, etc. They discuss TFOV, exit pupil, how you should select eyepieces, etc. Then go to their Eyepiece Calculator section also on their website and play around with that to see how different eyepiece focal lengths might perform in your scope from a numbers perspective anyway - you'll never know for sure until you try. But it's a good guide and can also assist if you're wanting to put together an eyepiece lineup of 4 or 5 eyepieces using what you already have and maybe adding one or two down the road.

 

Enjoy! Half the fun of this hobby is reading, researching and learning. I've learned a tonne on CN just reading through past discussions. 


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#13 Don W

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Posted 09 December 2019 - 12:01 PM

Very nice. I love my SDF!!


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#14 rgrhorton

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Posted 09 December 2019 - 08:19 PM

Of the eyepieces you have, the 27mm Panoptic would be an excellent low power eyepiece. That would give you a True Field of View (TFOV) of about 3.24 Degrees at a magnification of about 20X and an exit pupil of about 5.05mm. The TFOV would be mesmerizing especially when panning across star fields but that large exit pupil means if you're viewing in a light polluted area, you might notice a bit of a lightened or washed out background sky. You might find yourself starting with that eyepiece each time out before moving to more targeted views at higher magnification. The 55mm Plossl would give you an even wider TFOV of about 4.88 Degrees but the exit pupil would be over 10mm. And at a magnification of just 10X, for me would be an eyepiece I wouldn't use much unless at a dark site or if using filters for some fainter deep sky objects. But at 10X magnification, I'm not sure how useful it would be even for that. You may end up not using that eyepiece much. Someone mentioned using the 55m Plossl as your finder eyepiece and while this is a good idea and something many do, with a Gibraltar mount, would be a bit frustrating because when you find the object you want to view, as you remove the eyepiece to insert a higher magnification eyepiece, you find you might lose the target during that swap out/in process. Especially if going from your 1lb Plossl to your much lighter 19mm Wide Field. It could work for a while but adding a dedicated finder would just make things more fun and easier.

 

Your 12mm Nagler (can't tell if it's Type 2 or 4) would be phenomenal with the SDF. Would provide a TFOV of about 1.80 Degrees and an exit pupil of about 2.24mm and a magnification of 45X. This may become your most used eyepiece with that scope.

 

Of your other eyepieces, I think I see a 19mm wide field a 4.8 Nagler and some plossl's and an Ortho. All are good eyepieces. 

 

What you should do as part of your research into the hobby is go to TeleVue's website and read the articles posted there on eyepiece selection, etc. They discuss TFOV, exit pupil, how you should select eyepieces, etc. Then go to their Eyepiece Calculator section also on their website and play around with that to see how different eyepiece focal lengths might perform in your scope from a numbers perspective anyway - you'll never know for sure until you try. But it's a good guide and can also assist if you're wanting to put together an eyepiece lineup of 4 or 5 eyepieces using what you already have and maybe adding one or two down the road.

 

Enjoy! Half the fun of this hobby is reading, researching and learning. I've learned a tonne on CN just reading through past discussions. 

Thanks for the information. I'll have to check out TeleVue's site and learn more about eye pieces for sure.



#15 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 09 December 2019 - 08:42 PM

Congrats on the TV Genesis  sdf  and yes  sorry for your loss

 Welcome aboard    you have come to the right place  lots of helpful experienced folks   here. It is  a great telescope.

 

I myself was waiting for  TV Genesis sdf to pop up for sale   I  missed out on one that sold almost as soon as it was listed. I ended up with a  subsequent generation the TV np101.

 

Nice set of eyepieces btw     One purchase that helped me alot    was   a book  called   " Turn left at Orion " Of course on the forums page here  I always consult the Celestial events on the monthly celestial calender by Dave Mitsky

 

https://www.cloudyni...r/#entry9807486

 

 

 

Enjoy the Genesis

Keep looking up


Edited by Defenderslideguitar, 09 December 2019 - 08:52 PM.

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#16 Littlegreenman

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Posted 10 December 2019 - 05:01 AM

In my post above I said:

"4. The NGC Max by JMI  Check the NGC   4.gif website for instructions, or ask here on the Mount Forum if anyone has a manual and instructions and or Google it."

 

I'm quoting myself to correct myself. JMI is the company that made the NGC Max. Not NGC. Here is the link. JMI has apparently closed, but Farpoint is handling orders.

http://www.jimsmobile.com/buy_ngc.htm

 

#2a above, I posted: Things you never thought of.

Example: Check the area you intend to set your telescope on before doing so. Years ago I learned a lesson after setting up a few feet from an anthill.


Edited by Littlegreenman, 10 December 2019 - 05:49 PM.

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#17 Compressorguy

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Posted 10 December 2019 - 06:18 AM

Very nice scope. I have a 1985 brass TV Renaissance scope, which is a predecessor to your scope. Mine has Orion SkyWizard digital setting circle, which is just a rebrand of the NGC Max your has. Here’s a link to the manual for it but should work just fine for yours. Since yours is already installed, you should be able to skip installation and just turn it on and go straight to the operation instructions. Note the pointing accuracy will be dependent on how level the scope is at setup and how well you center the alignment stars. To get the scope level, align the two little half moon shapes on one of the mount pivot hinges so it forms a circle shape. It should be located near one of the brass thumb screws for locking the mount. Also put a small level on the scope and rotate the scope around. The bubble should remain level all the way around if you have it setup correctly. If not, adjust the tripod legs accordingly. This setup is being a little anal but will greatly improve the pointing/finding accuracy of the NGC Max. Download SkySafari app on your phone. It will be a big help in locating objects, alignment star names that you can then put that info into the NGC Max and point the telescope to them. Hope you enjoy your new scope!

 

https://www.telescop...29035_12-98.pdf


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#18 25585

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Posted 16 December 2019 - 03:34 PM

Great start scope into astronomy. Sorry for your loss, your uncle chose well, I am sure he would want you to enjoy it. Great eyepieces too!

 

I have a F5 original Genesis, and hope it will be enjoyed by future Generations after me.


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#19 rayden68

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Posted 17 December 2019 - 05:38 PM

I would also point out this is an outstanding vacation scope, you can use it all day to look at birds, sailboats far out to sea, climbers heading up the alps with breathtaking clarity all day then enjoy the stars at night. You can get a solar filter and enjoy the slowly starting sun cycle that is just getting underway. This is no one trick pony so don't limit it to one. Enjoy it. Also since you live south of Pittsburg it easy easy to take to a dark sky site and set up and more likely to be with you when you travel and get the opportunity!!!


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#20 rgrhorton

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Posted 18 December 2019 - 09:24 PM

Actually already bought a solar filter for it. Looks like the sun should be making itself visible again up here in the next few days so I'll get it try it out now. =)


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#21 Mountaineer370

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Posted 22 December 2019 - 04:40 PM

I'm late to the thread but just wanted to say that the Tele Vue Genesis-sdf on a Gibraltar mount is a very nice set-up indeed.  I've had mine for a year or so and it's one of just a few of my telescopes I will probably never sell.  If you haven't already gotten a finder, I really like the Tele Vue Starbeam that came on mine.  It's made to attach right to the tube ring, and unlike some red dot finders, you can actually see the red dot on the Starbeam with no difficulty at all.  I hope you've had a chance to get your telescope out and enjoy it a little bit.


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#22 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 23 December 2019 - 05:47 PM

RGR  So  here's hoping you get to check out the scope a bit more over the holiday

While Venus is super bright in the West after sunset     later in the evening it is hard to miss the Pleaides up high     and Orion in the south east. That TV Gensis sdf   escells at wide field lower power  and these are just two of the many targets you will enjoy....


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#23 paul

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Posted 23 December 2019 - 10:29 PM

Hi,

There is a very active astronomy club in Pittsburgh. They could help you out with some of your questions I am sure!

Good luck and enjoy the scope


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