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V623 Cassiopeiae

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#1 flt158

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Posted 10 December 2019 - 05:56 PM

Hello everyone. 

 

Having split some lovely doubles in Cassiopeiae on Monday 9th December 2019 with my William Optics 158 mm apochromatic refractor, I set out to find another carbon star in the south eastern corner of Cassiopeia. 

V623 Cassiopeiae is very near to the borders of Cassiopeia, Perseus and Camelopardalis. 

Its spectral class is R5. 

I found it quite easily starhopping from Eta Persei. 

I estimated its magnitude as 7.8 on www.aavso.org 

So it appears just below its maximum brightness of 7.6. 

At 40x it is quite bright and is a good orange carbon star. 

As I increased my magnification from 112X, 140X, and finally to 167X I found its distinctive colour got stronger. 

It is my 75th observed carbon star. 

 

Clear skies, 

 

Aubrey. 

 


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#2 fender2547886

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Posted 10 December 2019 - 07:46 PM

good work Aubrey!

ps i like your name it is the same as my grand daughter. I hope she likes astronomy as much as you do


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#3 flt158

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Posted 12 December 2019 - 10:31 AM

Yes, Fender2547886. 

I have met other Aubreys both as male and female. 

But I haven't met another astronomer called Aubrey. 

 

Kind regards, 

 

Aubrey (male). 



#4 Astrolog

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Posted 13 December 2019 - 04:20 PM

Aubrey

 

I have been enjoying reading your observing reports of carbon stars in Cassiopeia, and this one (V623) in particular due to its relatively bright magnitude. I plan to attempt an observation of this star on my next suitable opportunity.

As an aside, your previous report on ST Cass motivated me to have a go at observing a carbon star and due to starhopping deficiencies on my part, I ended up targeting W Cass instead on Dec 3rd at approx 7pm local.

I estimated this at magnitude 9.0 using an AAVSO star chart, and although relatively faint, I was able to observe that it was somewhat 'off-white' compared to its neighbors. This was my first carbon star observation and will not be the last.

 

All the best


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#5 Rich (RLTYS)

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Posted 13 December 2019 - 04:29 PM

My last observation of V623 Cas with my 10" refl I described the color as pale orange.


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#6 flt158

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Posted 14 December 2019 - 06:09 AM

Aubrey

 

I have been enjoying reading your observing reports of carbon stars in Cassiopeia, and this one (V623) in particular due to its relatively bright magnitude. I plan to attempt an observation of this star on my next suitable opportunity.

As an aside, your previous report on ST Cass motivated me to have a go at observing a carbon star and due to starhopping deficiencies on my part, I ended up targeting W Cass instead on Dec 3rd at approx 7pm local.

I estimated this at magnitude 9.0 using an AAVSO star chart, and although relatively faint, I was able to observe that it was somewhat 'off-white' compared to its neighbors. This was my first carbon star observation and will not be the last.

 

All the best

Thank you, Astrolog, for expressing your interest of carbon stars here on Cloudy Nights. 

 

Would you believe my next carbon star is going to be W Cassiopeiae?

I have never observed it before with any telescope. 

But can I ask you about your colour description regarding W Cas?

Did it not have an orange hue even in the slightest? 

But I do believe your magnitude is spot on!

 

As I am a huge fan of Eta Cassiopeiae (Achird), I am shocked that I have never noticed W Cassiopeiae which is very close by. 

I sincerely plan to view it at the next available opportunity.  

Christmas time in Ireland is extremely busy as per usual. 

Next Thursday is probably the next time I will set up my apochromatic refractor. 

I do have my Guide 9.1 DVD map printed off already and an AAVSO map also. 

 

Cassiopeia is such an superb constellation for an infinite number of reasons!!

 

Clear skies to all, 

 

Aubrey. 


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#7 flt158

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Posted 14 December 2019 - 06:10 AM

My last observation of V623 Cas with my 10" refl I described the color as pale orange.

Hello, Rich. 

Do you have any idea when you observed V623 Cas?

 

Kind regards from Aubrey. 



#8 Astrolog

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Posted 14 December 2019 - 01:06 PM

Thank you, Astrolog, for expressing your interest of carbon stars here on Cloudy Nights. 

 

Would you believe my next carbon star is going to be W Cassiopeiae?

I have never observed it before with any telescope. 

But can I ask you about your colour description regarding W Cas?

Did it not have an orange hue even in the slightest? 

But I do believe your magnitude is spot on!

 

As I am a huge fan of Eta Cassiopeiae (Achird), I am shocked that I have never noticed W Cassiopeiae which is very close by. 

I sincerely plan to view it at the next available opportunity.  

Christmas time in Ireland is extremely busy as per usual. 

Next Thursday is probably the next time I will set up my apochromatic refractor. 

I do have my Guide 9.1 DVD map printed off already and an AAVSO map also. 

 

Cassiopeia is such an superb constellation for an infinite number of reasons!!

 

Clear skies to all, 

 

Aubrey. 

To my eyes it appeared to be a golden yellow - noticeably different from the other stars in the field of view. I should have added above, I was viewing at magnification of approximately ~26x.

 

My next target will be V623 Cass so thanks for your report.

 

Michael


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#9 Rich (RLTYS)

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Posted 14 December 2019 - 01:09 PM

I observed V623 while working on the AL Carbon Star Program, that was on 1/14/11.


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#10 Rich (RLTYS)

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Posted 14 December 2019 - 01:14 PM

My last observation of W Cas it was too faint to see any color. Estimated mag, at the time, was mag 12.4, on 7-31-11. I'll have to observe it again.


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#11 flt158

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Posted 14 December 2019 - 04:13 PM

Thank you both very much for your interest in carbon stars, Rich and Michael. 

I might just have the opportunity next Tuesday 17th December in the early evening to study W Cassiopeiae. 

I need to get something done first, and if the skies are clear as they are supposed to be I will be giving it my best shot. 

I'll study the colour and its magnitude. 

 

Also on the menu is some time to check out WZ Cassiopeiae. 

It is hard to believe I haven't observed it since 2001. 

 

Clear skies from Aubrey. 



#12 Rich (RLTYS)

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Posted 15 December 2019 - 03:50 PM

Thank you both very much for your interest in carbon stars, Rich and Michael. 

I might just have the opportunity next Tuesday 17th December in the early evening to study W Cassiopeiae. 

I need to get something done first, and if the skies are clear as they are supposed to be I will be giving it my best shot. 

I'll study the colour and its magnitude. 

 

Also on the menu is some time to check out WZ Cassiopeiae. 

It is hard to believe I haven't observed it since 2001. 

 

Clear skies from Aubrey. 

Did you ever do the AL Carbon Star Program?



#13 flt158

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Posted 16 December 2019 - 05:43 PM

Hi Rich. 

 

Yes I have done in the past. 

I would recommend it to anyone. 

I did come across a very fine set of maps of a lot carbon stars just a few years ago. 

But my current list of carbon stars comes from numerous sources. 

Between 2 and 4 years ago a guy here on Cloudy Nights gave a colossal list of some 2343 carbon stars right down to +13.0 magnitude which are visible from my vantage point. 

His name is Eric (Cildarith). 

I still use that list. 

 

Kind regards, 

 

Aubrey. 



#14 ssmith

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Posted 26 December 2019 - 09:19 AM

Visited V623 Cass - here is a photo from 2018.
 
Sky Safari lists a color Index of +2.08 which would suggest a strong orange color but using SIMBAD B-V magnitudes I calculated a more modest Color Index of +1.45.
 
AAVSO observations gives a magnitude of ~ 7.7 at the time of my photo and shows a range of magnitude of 7.3 to 8.5.
 
Also I noticed a significant difference in coordinates between Sky Safari and SIMBAD
 
Sky Safari:  03 12 57.00   +57 58 32.90
    Simbad:  03 11 25.33   +57  54 11.23
 
This became evident when I tried to do a plate-solve which was unsuccessful using the Sky Safari coordinates. I have seen this sort of inaccuracy on other stars that I have observed.
 
V623 Cas 120mm 2-13-18 7fr.jpg


Edited by ssmith, 26 December 2019 - 11:00 AM.

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#15 flt158

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Posted 26 December 2019 - 11:51 AM

Hi Steve. 

It's always a real pleasure to view and to study one of your carbon star images. 

V623 Cas is another goodie!

That's some distance: 1800 light years. 

So it must be a supergiant star.  

 

Please keep those images coming. 

Perhaps you might have a go at NQ Cassiopeiae at some stage in the future.  

 

Privately I wonder how many carbon stars I will find in Cassiopeia over the coming 2 or 3 months. 

I try and discipline myself to see one new one per observing session. 

I dare not visit any other alternative constellation for now. 

 

Thankfully from my back garden, Cassiopeia is slowly descending from my zenith after 9 pm each clear night (whenever I get any).  

 

Kindest regards, and Happy New Year from Aubrey. 



#16 Rich (RLTYS)

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Posted 26 December 2019 - 02:18 PM

There's an interesting article in the Feb 2020 issue of S&T on Dwarf Carbon Stars. Most Astronomers have never heard of them. I took this image of the Dwarf Carbon Star G77-61, talked about in the article, from the Slooh Canary Islands Robotic Observatory. G77-61 is located in Taurus.

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  • G77-61 T2hm 12-21-19r.png

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#17 flt158

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Posted 26 December 2019 - 02:47 PM

That's very sweet, Rich!

G77-61 looks seriously dim. 

Do you have any idea regarding its magnitude?

Although a majority of these are variable stars. 

So they can be difficult to estimate. 

Thanks a bunch!

 

Clear skies from Aubrey. 



#18 Astrolog

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Posted 26 December 2019 - 05:36 PM

I finally had an opportunity to seek out V623 Cas for the first time last evening (00:10 UT 12/26/2019) and star hopped my way to it by following the path from Mirfak -> Y Per -> k Per to it, using an AAVSO chart (X24909H). Using this chart I estimated (visual) magnitude to be approximately 7.7 and the color appeared pale orange to my eye.

 

This was only my second carbon star observation - thanks to this thread!


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#19 ssmith

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Posted 26 December 2019 - 06:26 PM

Here is the Simbad Data for G77-61.  Vmag ~13.9

 

I'm going to try and get a photo tonite - Storm moving in tomorrow.

 

G77-61 Simbad Data.jpeg


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#20 flt158

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Posted 26 December 2019 - 06:32 PM

It is a real privilege to share my deep admiration for carbon stars here on Cloudy Nights. 

My very first carbon was T Lyrae way back in December 2000. 

My second was one of the very brightest in the entire sky: TX or 19 Piscium. 

(Give me TX any day)

 

My next carbon star I hope will be WW Cassiopeiae. 

It is near Ruchbah (Delta Cas).  

 

I reckon your colour and magnitude are spot on for V623 Cas, Michael. 

Well done!

I'm actually waiting for you to find one that I haven't observed yet!

And then you will be beginning to bother me somewhat!! bigblush.gif  lol.gif

 

My weather people are saying that we in Dublin, Ireland ought to have a clear night on Monday 30th December. 

Let's wait and see. 

 

Clear skies from Aubrey. 


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#21 Astrolog

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Posted 27 December 2019 - 09:48 AM

Visited V623 Cass - here is a photo from 2018.
 
Sky Safari lists a color Index of +2.08 which would suggest a strong orange color but using SIMBAD B-V magnitudes I calculated a more modest Color Index of +1.45.
 
AAVSO observations gives a magnitude of ~ 7.7 at the time of my photo and shows a range of magnitude of 7.3 to 8.5.
 
Also I noticed a significant difference in coordinates between Sky Safari and SIMBAD
 
Sky Safari:  03 12 57.00   +57 58 32.90
    Simbad:  03 11 25.33   +57  54 11.23
 
This became evident when I tried to do a plate-solve which was unsuccessful using the Sky Safari coordinates. I have seen this sort of inaccuracy on other stars that I have observed.
 
 

Hi Steve

I would describe myself as a relative beginner at variable star observing, but as I gain more experience I eventually hope to move into variable star photometry, to complement visual observing.

 

I very much like your photograph of V623 Cas above and was curious to learn a bit more about it.

Particularly, details about the telescope & camera you used to capture it and importantly - what sort of exposure(s) you might have used.

Do you use Vphot to obtain magnitude estimates or some other tool?

 

Regards, Michael


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#22 ssmith

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Posted 27 December 2019 - 01:00 PM

I very much like your photograph of V623 Cas above and was curious to learn a bit more about it.

Particularly, details about the telescope & camera you used to capture it and importantly - what sort of exposure(s) you might have used.

Do you use Vphot to obtain magnitude estimates or some other tool?

 

Regards, Michael

Michael -

 

Here are the photo details: 

 

Scope: 120mm refractor,  Olympus E-PL5 M43 camera, 7 frames x 20sec ISO1600

 

This exposure is too long to give accurate photometry results as the image of V623 is saturated. Usually exposure times for

for photometric measurements are relatively short.

 

I do not use VPhot but I believe it is the de-facto standard tool for variable star observers. I use AstroImageJ and Astrometrica.  Most Astro-Photo software packages have some photometric measuring capabilities.


Edited by ssmith, 27 December 2019 - 01:00 PM.

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#23 Astrolog

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Posted 27 December 2019 - 01:21 PM

Michael -

 

Here are the photo details: 

 

Scope: 120mm refractor,  Olympus E-PL5 M43 camera, 7 frames x 20sec ISO1600

 

This exposure is too long to give accurate photometry results as the image of V623 is saturated. Usually exposure times for

for photometric measurements are relatively short.

 

I do not use VPhot but I believe it is the de-facto standard tool for variable star observers. I use AstroImageJ and Astrometrica.  Most Astro-Photo software packages have some photometric measuring capabilities.

Steve - Thank you for sharing the photograph and the additional details.

This is helpful to a newbie like me as I had no feel for variable star photometry exposure times & image processing. 

 

For now I am deliberately focusing on developing visual observing skills using the fairly rudimentary optics I have before advancing into photometry, so the info provided above is of much interest to me.

 

Many thanks


Edited by Astrolog, 27 December 2019 - 01:23 PM.

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#24 The Ardent

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Posted 27 December 2019 - 01:24 PM

If you can star-hop to it you’re far more advanced than you give yourself credit for.

For now I am deliberately focusing on developing visual observing skills using the rudimentary optics I have before advancing into photometry, so the info provided above is of much interest to me.

Many thanks


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#25 Rich (RLTYS)

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Posted 27 December 2019 - 04:53 PM

That's very sweet, Rich!

G77-61 looks seriously dim. 

Do you have any idea regarding its magnitude?

Although a majority of these are variable stars. 

So they can be difficult to estimate. 

Thanks a bunch!

 

Clear skies from Aubrey. 

G77-61 is magnitude 13.9. Don't know if it's a variable.


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