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V623 Cassiopeiae

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#26 Rich (RLTYS)

Rich (RLTYS)

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Posted 27 December 2019 - 05:00 PM

It is a real privilege to share my deep admiration for carbon stars here on Cloudy Nights. 

My very first carbon was T Lyrae way back in December 2000. 

My second was one of the very brightest in the entire sky: TX or 19 Piscium. 

(Give me TX any day)

 

Clear skies from Aubrey. 

I remember observing TX Piscium in a 20" refl. It was a beautiful Pumpkin Orange.


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#27 Astrolog

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Posted 27 December 2019 - 06:03 PM

There's an interesting article in the Feb 2020 issue of S&T on Dwarf Carbon Stars. Most Astronomers have never heard of them. I took this image of the Dwarf Carbon Star G77-61, talked about in the article, from the Slooh Canary Islands Robotic Observatory. G77-61 is located in Taurus.

Rich - After reading your post, I finally opened my Feb 2020 issue of S&T and read the article about Dwarf Carbon stars.

I certainly had never heard of this type of carbon star prior to reading this: a very good read.


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#28 ssmith

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Posted 27 December 2019 - 06:54 PM

There's an interesting article in the Feb 2020 issue of S&T on Dwarf Carbon Stars. Most Astronomers have never heard of them. I took this image of the Dwarf Carbon Star G77-61, talked about in the article, from the Slooh Canary Islands Robotic Observatory. G77-61 is located in Taurus.

Rich -

 

Thanks for the heads-up on these objects.  I managed to get a  few images of G77-61 last night before the storm clouds moved in.  Measured the magnitude at 14.0

 

This object also has  a high proper motion as brought out in the article.  I took my photo and overlayed it on a DSS photo taken in 1988.  You can see the stars motion over the intervening 31 years. 

 

G77-61 Tau C9 12-26-19 8fr.jpg

 

G77-61 1988-2019 PM.jpg


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#29 Rich (RLTYS)

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Posted 28 December 2019 - 08:29 AM

That is so cool, I was wondering why the faint star just to the left of G77-61 was in a different position on my image as compared to the S&T image. G77-61 had changed position heading southward, the S&T image is older. cool.gif




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