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Binoviewing with Refractors

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18 replies to this topic

#1 sarco789

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Posted 11 December 2019 - 06:52 AM

I tried binoviewing a few years ago with a f/6 72mm refractor and a cheap bino setup and had absolutely no success. I now have a TV85 on a mount that is more than adequate for it. Would someone please share a succes story using binos with refractors? I’m currently looking at the Maxbright II or the WO, plus a pair of clickstop zooms. Thanks in advance

#2 Mark9473

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Posted 11 December 2019 - 07:46 AM

It takes only a single look at the Moon or Saturn to be convinced of the value of binoviewing.

I'm not sure why that wouldn't have worked with your 72mm.

As for DSO, that has no appeal to me (binoviewing DSO, that is) because of the inevitable loss of light and clarity. But, as I've learned on this forum, YMMV.

But if DSO was your main intention then you would have been better off getting a second 72mm and making a binoscope. IMHO, of course.


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#3 Eddgie

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Posted 11 December 2019 - 08:55 AM

Well, I think you need to define success.

Do you mean where they successful in getting it to work with no amplifer or successful in the sense that the binoviewers provided better views than using a single eyepiece?


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#4 Bataleon

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Posted 12 December 2019 - 03:44 AM

I have the Williams BV and it's great for the price. The included eyepieces are also no slouch, all things considered. I have had no issues with it in any of the scopes I've used it in including a 102 frac which yours should easily outclass. I will say twin eyepieces tend to fog up faster than when monocular viewing, but that's probably more to do with one's perception of fog with both eyes vs one. Nothing some dew straps can't remedy.

Sent from my SM-N960F using Tapatalk
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#5 Jim in PA

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Posted 13 December 2019 - 02:43 PM

I also have the WO binoviewer, with both the 1.6X and 2X barlows made for it.  Works fine on both my 102/F10 and 102/F5 refractors.  I even got it to focus using a 2.5X Powermate, not that it was needed, just wanted to see if I could.  I have no experience with the Maxbright II or using the WO with clickstop zooms.



#6 REC

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Posted 14 December 2019 - 01:11 PM

I have the Williams BV and it's great for the price. The included eyepieces are also no slouch, all things considered. I have had no issues with it in any of the scopes I've used it in including a 102 frac which yours should easily outclass. I will say twin eyepieces tend to fog up faster than when monocular viewing, but that's probably more to do with one's perception of fog with both eyes vs one. Nothing some dew straps can't remedy.

Sent from my SM-N960F using Tapatalk

I also have a C102 f/9.8 and I had to get a Baader T2 diagonal and a RAF adapter to get the scope to focus without any barlows. Keeps the native focal length. Nice set-up.



#7 daquad

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Posted 18 December 2019 - 03:17 PM

It takes only a single look at the Moon or Saturn to be convinced of the value of binoviewing.

I'm not sure why that wouldn't have worked with your 72mm.

As for DSO, that has no appeal to me (binoviewing DSO, that is) because of the inevitable loss of light and clarity. But, as I've learned on this forum, YMMV.

But if DSO was your main intention then you would have been better off getting a second 72mm and making a binoscope. IMHO, of course.

Actually I find that binoviewing with DSO's is very rewarding, especially with open clusters.  I know it is an illusion, but they seem to take on a 3-D appearance.  As for clarity, if the moon is sharp in your BV's why wouldn't DSO's also be sharp, albeit slightly dimmer?

 

Dom Q.


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#8 Bob4BVM

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Posted 20 December 2019 - 04:07 PM

I tried binoviewing a few years ago with a f/6 72mm refractor and a cheap bino setup and had absolutely no success. I now have a TV85 on a mount that is more than adequate for it. Would someone please share a succes story using binos with refractors? I’m currently looking at the Maxbright II or the WO, plus a pair of clickstop zooms. Thanks in advance

I BV with fracs all the time, piece of cake if BVing works for you

"  success story" ?  If you can make it work, there is really no comparison

See the discussion going on here- my own   success story is in post#12...

 

 https://www.cloudyni...on-binoviewers/


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#9 sarco789

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Posted 08 January 2020 - 10:33 AM

OK guys thanks my interest in binoviewing is sufficiently reinvigorated. I’m torn between one of the inexpensive Chinese units and the Maxbright II. Is there a sufficiently wide lightpath  through the “cheapies”? Also, has anyone tried Baader clickstop zooms?


Edited by sarco789, 08 January 2020 - 11:17 AM.


#10 REC

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Posted 08 January 2020 - 01:44 PM

my

OK guys thanks my interest in binoviewing is sufficiently reinvigorated. I’m torn between one of the inexpensive Chinese units and the Maxbright II. Is there a sufficiently wide lightpath  through the “cheapies”? Also, has anyone tried Baader clickstop zooms?

You will have to find out if you have enough back focus on the 85 and 72mm scope to see if you need to use a barlow to get it to focus. If not, you will have to use the 1.6x barlow that the WO comes with. I could not get my C80ED f/600mm to focus unless I used the barlow. And that had to be put in FRONT of the diagonal to make it work. It turned the focal length into a 1500mm scope. I could not get the BV to work on my PST no matter what I tried. You would have to spent over $200 to get an OCS to get it to focus....too much money for me.

 

FYI, I have a C102 that I was able to get the WO to focus without a barlow, but it cost me over $200. Had to buy a Baader T2 diagonal and a custom made adapter that allowed me to remove the nose of the BV to make a direct connection to the diagonal and save back space. Was it worth it, yeah I think it was.



#11 sarco789

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Posted 08 January 2020 - 09:17 PM

Thanks for the experienced information. Does the lightpath in your WO seem wide enough?

#12 REC

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Posted 12 January 2020 - 02:21 PM

Thanks for the experienced information. Does the lightpath in your WO seem wide enough?

Yeah, works fine. I use the pair that come with it in my refractor and the heavier pair of Meade 20mm 68* in my 8" SCT.



#13 Spikey131

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Posted 15 January 2020 - 08:24 AM

The biggest problem with the Maxbright 2 is that it doesn’t existbangbang.gif


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#14 Cali

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Posted 18 January 2020 - 11:21 AM

I have these and they turned my scope into a whole new instrument. There again I have a Mak, but I've read the same success story from those with a refractor.

 

- Cal


Edited by Cali, 18 January 2020 - 11:24 AM.


#15 grif 678

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Posted 18 January 2020 - 05:59 PM

The Williams Optics are a very good choice, with spending a huge price.


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#16 grif 678

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Posted 20 January 2020 - 03:32 PM

The Williams Optics are a very good choice, with spending a huge price.

I meant withOUT spending  huge price



#17 aa6ww

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Posted 22 January 2020 - 02:47 PM

I've found that the quality of the binoviewer makes a huge difference on how well my binoviewing experiences can be. For the longest time, I've used a Burgess Binoviewer for solar and it seemed to work fine, but it never seemed to work right for deep space. Same with a William Optics binoviewer I had. I was just never that perfect comfortable viewing with them. I had to get the angle just right for me to position my head to see clearly through them also.

Then I looked through a friends Televue Binoviewer and I was amazed at how easy everything came to focus. I didn't have to look directly into it, there was none of that. It just worked and worked very well.

Since then, I've found a nice used one for sale and purchased it. I have two sets of ES 68 and 82 degrees 1.25" eyepieces and use them in my binoviewer. When I really want to look at something, like watch the GRS travel across Jupiter's surface or study Jupiter or Saturn more in depth, the binoviewer is always preferred.
Late last year, I used it to look for the Armstrong, Aldrin and Collins craters looking for the Apollo 11 Landing site, and it was a real asset adding more contrast to the image and making a more comfortable experience.

I have to use the Optical corrector in my refractors, but it doesn't seem to effect anything except make the focal length longer, which when watching planets or observing double stars, or during lunar observing, the longer focal length is welcome.

...Ralph

Edited by aa6ww, 22 January 2020 - 02:49 PM.

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#18 JoshUrban

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Posted 29 January 2020 - 10:38 PM

Sure thing!  I love my binoviewer through a refractor (Televue through an AstroTech 102ED.)  I think my favorite scope for the BV's is a cool old 8" f/8 dob, but the refractor is super fun.  I like it for both lunar/planetary, and deep sky work.  One thing I will say:  it makes the rig a lot more...fragile.  There's a lot of things sticking off the tripod, lots of added weight and leverage, and is definitely to be used with care.  Then again, this isn't a field for durability!

 

  For eyepieces, I use University Optics 24mm Konigs, UO 12.5mm Orthos, and recently, although it seems like a strange choice, Celestron Halloween plossls in 40mm.  Those are great for widefield work.  

 

  What a fun, fun way to look at the sky!  


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#19 Bob4BVM

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Posted 29 January 2020 - 10:54 PM

Sure thing!  I love my binoviewer through a refractor (Televue through an AstroTech 102ED.)  I think my favorite scope for the BV's is a cool old 8" f/8 dob, but the refractor is super fun.  I like it for both lunar/planetary, and deep sky work.  One thing I will say:  it makes the rig a lot more...fragile.  There's a lot of things sticking off the tripod, lots of added weight and leverage, and is definitely to be used with care.  Then again, this isn't a field for durability!

 

  For eyepieces, I use University Optics 24mm Konigs, UO 12.5mm Orthos, and recently, although it seems like a strange choice, Celestron Halloween plossls in 40mm.  Those are great for widefield work.  

 

  What a fun, fun way to look at the sky!  

Yes to all that !

Also, plug in a pair of quality zoom EPs and enjoy the endless detail on the moon at the perfect magnification & FOV for each feature.

One of the real treats in amateur astronomy, but it will ruin you for cyclops vision, I just cannot mono-view the Moon anymore !

CS,

Bob


Edited by Bob4BVM, 29 January 2020 - 10:56 PM.

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