Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Who is going to be the 1st one?

  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 hallelujah

hallelujah

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 7,639
  • Joined: 14 Jul 2006
  • Loc: North Star over Colorado

Posted 13 December 2019 - 03:48 PM

Who on CN will see it first with binoculars?

 

https://theskylive.com/c2019q4-info

 

Stan



#2 bananas

bananas

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • Posts: 26
  • Joined: 20 Sep 2018

Posted 13 December 2019 - 04:52 PM

With a magnitude of 16, no one.


  • rehling likes this

#3 Pinac

Pinac

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,102
  • Joined: 26 Dec 2013
  • Loc: Switzerland

Posted 13 December 2019 - 05:08 PM

Who on CN will see it first with binoculars?

 

https://theskylive.com/c2019q4-info

 

Stan

I tried today with my Trinovid 8x20, but I am not sure I really saw it smile.gif


  • Jon Isaacs, Mr. Bill and Stellarfire like this

#4 hallelujah

hallelujah

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 7,639
  • Joined: 14 Jul 2006
  • Loc: North Star over Colorado

Posted 13 December 2019 - 05:19 PM

https://www.skyandte...rstellar-comet/

 

Stan



#5 hallelujah

hallelujah

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 7,639
  • Joined: 14 Jul 2006
  • Loc: North Star over Colorado

Posted 13 December 2019 - 05:24 PM

I tried today with my Trinovid 8x20, but I am not sure I really saw it smile.gif

You will probably have better results with this:

 

https://binocular.ch...on-10x30-is-ii/

 

grin.gif


Edited by hallelujah, 13 December 2019 - 05:24 PM.

  • Pinac likes this

#6 Rich V.

Rich V.

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6,690
  • Joined: 02 Jan 2005
  • Loc: Lake Tahoe area, Nevada

Posted 13 December 2019 - 05:27 PM

While I doubt we'll be seeing it in our binoculars, it will surely be an interesting object for the professional astronomical community to study.  Only the second interstellar object we're aware of to pass through our system, it will be around a lot longer for study than the interstellar asteroid 'Oumuamua which made a brief appearance in 2017.

 

Rich



#7 hallelujah

hallelujah

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 7,639
  • Joined: 14 Jul 2006
  • Loc: North Star over Colorado

Posted 13 December 2019 - 05:32 PM

    it will surely be an interesting object for the professional astronomical community to study.

 

Rich

http://www.sci-news....isov-07901.html

 

Stan



#8 PEterW

PEterW

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,877
  • Joined: 02 Jan 2006
  • Loc: SW London, UK

Posted 14 December 2019 - 04:48 AM

Maybe 15mag http://aerith.net/co...02I/2019Q4.html there are a good few brighter than that at the moment to try first.

Peter

#9 Pinac

Pinac

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,102
  • Joined: 26 Dec 2013
  • Loc: Switzerland

Posted 14 December 2019 - 04:58 AM

You will probably have better results with this:

 

https://binocular.ch...on-10x30-is-ii/

 

grin.gif

I tried, but couldn't see a thing frown.gif  (the layer of rainclouds was too thick)



#10 Erik Bakker

Erik Bakker

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 8,287
  • Joined: 10 Aug 2006
  • Loc: Netherlands, Europe

Posted 14 December 2019 - 05:28 AM

Remarkable to read the amount of publicized info on a comet this dim, even with a S&T article with nice "finder" charts as if it was an apparition of an easy to see bright comet. Yet even my 16" f/5 may only show it as a very dim object, if at all, if I am not under pristine mountain skies on a moonless night. Yet with all the charts and hoopla, I had to double check the visual magnitude twice to confirm it is an extraordinary dim object with a peak brightness of around Mv 15 instead of a bright Mv 1.5 naked eye comet. All of a sudden, Pluto seems like a bright naked eye planet that will be featured in a next article lol.gif

 

Fortunately, Bob King puts it in perspective into his S&T article Stan linked to above:

 

"Right now, Comet Borisov is small and compact with a short tail pointing northwest. If the comet remains compact or nearly stellar and reaches magnitude 15.0, experienced observers might spot it in a 10-inch. Chances improve for telescopes 12-inches (30.5-cm) or larger under dark, moonless skies. Equally important is to use high magnification to "expand" the small object and further darken the sky background. I recommend 200× or better."


  • hallelujah, orionic and ihf like this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics