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"Ladies & gentlemen we are floating in space"

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#1 vineyard

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Posted 16 December 2019 - 06:00 PM

Hello,

 

I just wanted to share my initial reactions to my first ever BVing stint.  It was super-short (just about 15-20 mins before clouds rolled in).  It was in a heavily light-polluted city, & I didn't have filters in.  But O. M. G.

 

I'd gotten a pair of Carl Zeiss Deluxe BVs from Denis Levatic, and also separately tracked down a pair of E-PI 10x/20 Zeiss aspherics (25mm f/l).  Finally got a chance to use the combination this weekend for a short stint.  Just set up an alt-az mount, looked for some stars and pointed the scope.

 

Honestly it was like floating in space!  People talk about Naglers giving a porthole experience, but the BV feeling is so immersive, that it's almost like visual astronomy was being reinvented then & there.  These weren't even rich star-fields, but the feeling was amazing.  In fact, my mind v quickly also started wondering that if this is what it feels like w these EPs, what would the FOV of Nagler 13s feel like?  So much so that I may have to ditch my old & beautiful 12T2 for a pair of 13T6 (b/c I'll never get 2 hand grenades side-by-side on the BVs!).

 

I am really looking forward to a proper stint with them, on the moon, the Sun, the Pleiades, Orion nebulae to start with.  Things could never be the same again for my visual practice.  And that's even before I get to a dark site smile.gif

 

I'll stop wittering on now, but boy oh boy - if anyone is reading this while they are thinking about whether to BV or not, you've got to give it a go!

 

Cheers,

 

Vin

 

(PS - what do folks use for their short f/l EPs?  I've got 2x40mm TV plossls, the 2x25mm Zeiss aspherics - my thinking was to go down the 2x13mm Delites route but I'm seriously thinking about changing that now.  For even shorter f/l what do most folks use - I was thinking of 9mm or 7mm Delites (since these will be for more magnification, is it better to go for the better transmission of Delites or would larger FOV still make a difference at those powers too)?)

 

(PPS - Denis has been excellent throughout - prompt, objective, lots of tips & recommendations.  If I could buy more BVs I would happily do so, but you only really need one, right?  And I also have to say thanks to Eddgie b/c his thread & feedback on tracking an optical path & thus image sizes in BVs was v helpful)


Edited by vineyard, 16 December 2019 - 06:00 PM.

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#2 Kutno

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Posted 16 December 2019 - 06:19 PM

Hello,

 

Honestly it was like floating in space!  People talk about Naglers giving a porthole experience, but the BV feeling is so immersive, that it's almost like visual astronomy was being reinvented then & there.  These weren't even rich star-fields, but the feeling was amazing.  In fact, my mind v quickly also started wondering that if this is what it feels like w these EPs, what would the FOV of Nagler 13s feel like?

 

Vin

 

 

 

They are absolutely wonderful to use, Vin.  A pair of 13mm Nagler Type 6s motivated me to get a pair of 16mm Nagler Type 5s and more pairs of the Type 6 tribe.  I prefer the wider expanse offered by the Naglers and very much appreciate their relatively small size for binoviewing.


Edited by Kutno, 16 December 2019 - 06:20 PM.

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#3 Kutno

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Posted 16 December 2019 - 06:45 PM

Welcome to the club, too, Vin.  It really is an eye-opening experience to binoview.


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#4 Astro-Master

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Posted 16 December 2019 - 07:47 PM

Don't ever pass up the chance to try a pair of 17.5mm Morpheus in a BV.  I liked it way better than a pair of 16 T5 Naglers.


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#5 Eddgie

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Posted 16 December 2019 - 09:31 PM

An excellent first report. 

 

Like every consumer astronomy purchase, the BV entails some compromise, but it makes up for it by providing binocular summation (makes things appear larger, and improves your visual acuity). But dismissing all of the tech stuff, the real benefit is that it is just a great way to view!  I mean would you walk around or drive with one eye closed?  Of course not!  And for a lot of people using telescopes with binoviewers, they would say "Why would I want to use one eye with a telescope when I can use two!"

 

Looking forward to your first views of the moon.   You already played the OMG card, so you better start looking for other superlatives!  LOL.


Edited by Eddgie, 16 December 2019 - 09:32 PM.

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#6 denis0007dl

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Posted 16 December 2019 - 09:38 PM

Don't ever pass up the chance to try a pair of 17.5mm Morpheus in a BV.  I liked it way better than a pair of 16 T5 Naglers.

Morpheus 17.5mm are awsome binoviewer pair, very very comfortable, and very immersive FOV, but Naglers are better in sharpness and contrast, much better built quality, and more compact.

 

Both of them have their strenghts, and both are great binoviewer pairs.


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#7 Jeff B

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Posted 17 December 2019 - 12:14 PM

So I may get a bit of grief here for recommending this but, from the cheap seats while also still loaded with visual thrills, are a pair of the Edmund RKE 28mm.

 

Jeff


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#8 denis0007dl

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Posted 17 December 2019 - 01:44 PM

Yep, tottaly forgot RKEs 28mm-very unique, and I like them a lot as well.
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#9 Tom Masterson

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Posted 25 December 2019 - 11:29 AM

Glad you enjoyed your first view the way nature intended - with two eyes. Binoviewing allows the eye-brain to work the way it was designed and suddenly the view just feels more natural because it is. It also allows the brain the do a few little neat tricks of special image processing that adds pseudo depth that just isn't there with monovision. As Eddgie said, just wait until you see the Moon. I've always enjoyed slewing around the surface of the Moon at high power, but with a binoviewer, it's like you have your face pressed against the pothole of your spaceship. You'll see textures and subtle shading variations that you've never seen before. Jupiter will be a sphere floating in space surrounded by tiny moons and Saturn . . .  shocked.gif  One of my favorites is a full disk view of the Sun in h-alpha. Like the Moon, subtle details are seen for the first time and the Sun's disk actually looks like it's spherical, not a flat round disk. I know its not real depth perception, but I'll take the illusion anytime.

 

Enjoy.


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#10 sonny.barile

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Posted 25 December 2019 - 07:22 PM

So I may get a bit of grief here for recommending this but, from the cheap seats while also still loaded with visual thrills, are a pair of the Edmund RKE 28mm.

 

Jeff

I have a pair for my WO bv’s and a c8 with a shortened light path set up and the view thru the RKE’s is immersive and the stars are well defined. I’m not sure what the reason for such spectacular views are as the glass and coatings are nothing special and the AFoV is only 45 degrees.  It’s got to be the minimal amount of glass (3 element) or the design itself (arrangement)  The eye lens is huge and shaped in a way which gives that famous hovering effect but that’s not what I’m getting at here. 

Brighter targets like M42 can be seen with incredible contrast which helps define all those whispey lanes. I wholeheartedly recommend the 28 RKE’s in a BV. 

 

Sorry for the off topic post but when I see people mentioning the RKE 28’s I cant help myself. 


Edited by sonny.barile, 25 December 2019 - 07:29 PM.

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#11 rongatlin7

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Posted 26 December 2019 - 04:55 PM

Very nice report! I was wondering what telescope you are using?

#12 B 26354

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Posted 26 December 2019 - 11:37 PM

Very nice report! I was wondering what telescope you are using?

His scopes are in his signature. grin.gif



#13 REC

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Posted 30 December 2019 - 01:48 PM

Hello,

 

I just wanted to share my initial reactions to my first ever BVing stint.  It was super-short (just about 15-20 mins before clouds rolled in).  It was in a heavily light-polluted city, & I didn't have filters in.  But O. M. G.

 

I'd gotten a pair of Carl Zeiss Deluxe BVs from Denis Levatic, and also separately tracked down a pair of E-PI 10x/20 Zeiss aspherics (25mm f/l).  Finally got a chance to use the combination this weekend for a short stint.  Just set up an alt-az mount, looked for some stars and pointed the scope.

 

Honestly it was like floating in space!  People talk about Naglers giving a porthole experience, but the BV feeling is so immersive, that it's almost like visual astronomy was being reinvented then & there.  These weren't even rich star-fields, but the feeling was amazing.  In fact, my mind v quickly also started wondering that if this is what it feels like w these EPs, what would the FOV of Nagler 13s feel like?  So much so that I may have to ditch my old & beautiful 12T2 for a pair of 13T6 (b/c I'll never get 2 hand grenades side-by-side on the BVs!).

 

I am really looking forward to a proper stint with them, on the moon, the Sun, the Pleiades, Orion nebulae to start with.  Things could never be the same again for my visual practice.  And that's even before I get to a dark site smile.gif

 

I'll stop wittering on now, but boy oh boy - if anyone is reading this while they are thinking about whether to BV or not, you've got to give it a go!

 

Cheers,

 

Vin

 

(PS - what do folks use for their short f/l EPs?  I've got 2x40mm TV plossls, the 2x25mm Zeiss aspherics - my thinking was to go down the 2x13mm Delites route but I'm seriously thinking about changing that now.  For even shorter f/l what do most folks use - I was thinking of 9mm or 7mm Delites (since these will be for more magnification, is it better to go for the better transmission of Delites or would larger FOV still make a difference at those powers too)?)

 

(PPS - Denis has been excellent throughout - prompt, objective, lots of tips & recommendations.  If I could buy more BVs I would happily do so, but you only really need one, right?  And I also have to say thanks to Eddgie b/c his thread & feedback on tracking an optical path & thus image sizes in BVs was v helpful)

I have one 13mm T6 and always wondered what the view would be like? My 16mm Brandon set are my most used.

 

BTW, don't forget to add a UHC filter in the BV for M42, really makes it pop!


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